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Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 10
General Meade on his late movement. --The following is an extract from a letter of General Meade to a friend in Newark, New Jersey, written just before the last movement of the Army of the Potomac: "I am fully aware of the great anxiety in the public mind that something should be done. I am in receipt of many letters, some from persons in high positions, telling me I had better have my army destroyed and the country filled up with the bodies of the soldiers than to remain inactive. Whilst I do not suffer myself to be influenced by such communications, I am and have been most anxious to effect something, but am determined, at every hazard, not to attempt anything unless my judgment indicates a probability of accomplishing some object commensurate with the destruction of life necessarily involved. I would rather a thousand times he relieved, charged with tardiness or incompetency, than have my conscience burdened with a wanton slaughter, uselessly, of brave men, or with ha
General Meade on his late movement. --The following is an extract from a letter of General Meade to a friend in Newark, New Jersey, written just before the last movement of the Army of the Potomac: "I am fully aware of the great anxiety in the public mind that something should be done. I am in receipt of many letters, some from persons in high positions, telling me I had better have my army destroyed and the country filled up with the bodies of the soldiers than to remain inactive.General Meade to a friend in Newark, New Jersey, written just before the last movement of the Army of the Potomac: "I am fully aware of the great anxiety in the public mind that something should be done. I am in receipt of many letters, some from persons in high positions, telling me I had better have my army destroyed and the country filled up with the bodies of the soldiers than to remain inactive. Whilst I do not suffer myself to be influenced by such communications, I am and have been most anxious to effect something, but am determined, at every hazard, not to attempt anything unless my judgment indicates a probability of accomplishing some object commensurate with the destruction of life necessarily involved. I would rather a thousand times he relieved, charged with tardiness or incompetency, than have my conscience burdened with a wanton slaughter, uselessly, of brave men, or with