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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Droop Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
an amendment, the House bill to prohibit dealing in the paper currency of the enemy. Put on the calendar and ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Orr, after some discussion, the Senate resolved into secret Executive session. The House was called to order at 11 o'clock by the Speaker. The Chair laid before the House a communication from the President enclosing a communication from the Secretary of War, covering a copy of the report of Brig. Gen. Echols of the battle of Droop Mountain.-- Also, another communication, conveying copies of reports of military operations, submitted in response to resolutions of the House. The Chair also submitted Senate joint resolution of thanks to Gen. Robert E. Lee and the officers and soldiers under his command, which was at once taken up and passed. Mr. Russell, of Va., introduced a bill entitled an act to repeal certain laws exempting persons from military service; which, on his motion, was laid on the table. Mr. Miles
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
Confederate States Congress. After prayer by the Rev. Mr. Minnigerode, of the Episcopal Church, the Senate was called to order by Mr. Hunter, of Va., President pro tem. Mr. Johnson, of Ga., offered the following, which was agreed to: Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury lay before the Senate a statement shoears practice, praying exemption from military service. The memorial was accompanied by a recommendation in its favor, signed by the Surgeon General of the Confederate States and a number of surgeons and physicians. Mr. Sparrow, from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported back, with the recommendation that it do not pas in relation to the war: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States, That the present is deemed a fitting occasion to remind the people of the Confederate States that they are engaged in a struggle for the preservation both of liberty and civilization, and that no sacrifices of life or fortune can be too costly which
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 2
of the Confederate States and a number of surgeons and physicians. Mr. Sparrow, from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported back, with the recommendation that it do not pass, the resolution relative to the appointment of chaplains for battalions in the army. The resolution was laid on the table. Mr. Phelan, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported back, with the recommendation that it pass, the bill to provide for the auditing and payment of certain claims in the State of Mississippi. The bill was ordered to be printed. Mr. Caperton, from the same committee, reported back, with an amendment, the House bill to prohibit dealing in the paper currency of the enemy. Put on the calendar and ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Orr, after some discussion, the Senate resolved into secret Executive session. The House was called to order at 11 o'clock by the Speaker. The Chair laid before the House a communication from the President enclosing a comm
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
-- Also, another communication, conveying copies of reports of military operations, submitted in response to resolutions of the House. The Chair also submitted Senate joint resolution of thanks to Gen. Robert E. Lee and the officers and soldiers under his command, which was at once taken up and passed. Mr. Russell, of Va., introduced a bill entitled an act to repeal certain laws exempting persons from military service; which, on his motion, was laid on the table. Mr. Miles, of S. C., from the Military Committee, reported the following bill on the same subject: The Congress of the Confederate States do enact, That from and after the passage of this act, all acts and parts of acts exempting persons from military service be, and the same is hereby, repeated, except in so far as they relate to officers of the Confederate and State Governments, and hereafter no person shall be exempt from such service, than the following, to wit: All who shall be held to be unfit for m
B. J. Johnson (search for this): article 2
Confederate States Congress. After prayer by the Rev. Mr. Minnigerode, of the Episcopal Church, the Senate was called to order by Mr. Hunter, of Va., President pro tem. Mr. Johnson, of Ga., offered the following, which was agreed to: Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury lay before the Senate a statement showing the amount of property and credits that have been taken possession of under the laws of sequestration and confliction; what amount is in judgment, unsold and uncollected; what amount, in money, has been realized in the several States of the Confederacy and paid into the Treasury; what the balance, if any, which, being collected by the various receivers, has not yet been paid into the Treasury; and what is the amount of property and credits still in litigation, and where such litigation is pending. Mr. Caperton, of Va., presented a memorial of dental surgeons, of ten years practice, praying exemption from military service. The memorial was accompani
me committee, reported back, with an amendment, the House bill to prohibit dealing in the paper currency of the enemy. Put on the calendar and ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Orr, after some discussion, the Senate resolved into secret Executive session. The House was called to order at 11 o'clock by the Speaker. The Chair laid before the House a communication from the President enclosing a communication from the Secretary of War, covering a copy of the report of Brig. Gen. Echols of the battle of Droop Mountain.-- Also, another communication, conveying copies of reports of military operations, submitted in response to resolutions of the House. The Chair also submitted Senate joint resolution of thanks to Gen. Robert E. Lee and the officers and soldiers under his command, which was at once taken up and passed. Mr. Russell, of Va., introduced a bill entitled an act to repeal certain laws exempting persons from military service; which, on his motion, was
upon whatever pretext it may be made; to a generous support of all branches of the Government in the legitimate exercise of their constitutional powers; and to that harmonious, unselfish, and patriotic co-operation which can alone impart to our cause that irresistible strength which springs from united counsels, fraternal feelings, and fervent devotion to the public weal. After some discussion, on motion of Mr. Clapp, of Miss., the resolution was referred to a select committee. Mr. Chilton, of Ala., moved to reconsider the vote by which the resolution was referred, with a view to offering the following amendment: "And we urge upon our people to regard as the whisperings of treason in its most dangerous form all suggestions favoring a reconstruction with the Government which thus seeks to enslave us." The motion to reconsider did not prevail, so the resolution and amendment were referred to a select committee. Mr. Clapp called for the order of the day, and moved th
to the Treasury; what the balance, if any, which, being collected by the various receivers, has not yet been paid into the Treasury; and what is the amount of property and credits still in litigation, and where such litigation is pending. Mr. Caperton, of Va., presented a memorial of dental surgeons, of ten years practice, praying exemption from military service. The memorial was accompanied by a recommendation in its favor, signed by the Surgeon General of the Confederate States and a num Mr. Phelan, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported back, with the recommendation that it pass, the bill to provide for the auditing and payment of certain claims in the State of Mississippi. The bill was ordered to be printed. Mr. Caperton, from the same committee, reported back, with an amendment, the House bill to prohibit dealing in the paper currency of the enemy. Put on the calendar and ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Orr, after some discussion, the Senate res
Minnigerode (search for this): article 2
Confederate States Congress. After prayer by the Rev. Mr. Minnigerode, of the Episcopal Church, the Senate was called to order by Mr. Hunter, of Va., President pro tem. Mr. Johnson, of Ga., offered the following, which was agreed to: Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury lay before the Senate a statement showing the amount of property and credits that have been taken possession of under the laws of sequestration and confliction; what amount is in judgment, unsold and uncollected; what amount, in money, has been realized in the several States of the Confederacy and paid into the Treasury; what the balance, if any, which, being collected by the various receivers, has not yet been paid into the Treasury; and what is the amount of property and credits still in litigation, and where such litigation is pending. Mr. Caperton, of Va., presented a memorial of dental surgeons, of ten years practice, praying exemption from military service. The memorial was accompanie
ious, unselfish, and patriotic co-operation which can alone impart to our cause that irresistible strength which springs from united counsels, fraternal feelings, and fervent devotion to the public weal. After some discussion, on motion of Mr. Clapp, of Miss., the resolution was referred to a select committee. Mr. Chilton, of Ala., moved to reconsider the vote by which the resolution was referred, with a view to offering the following amendment: "And we urge upon our people to regard rge upon our people to regard as the whisperings of treason in its most dangerous form all suggestions favoring a reconstruction with the Government which thus seeks to enslave us." The motion to reconsider did not prevail, so the resolution and amendment were referred to a select committee. Mr. Clapp called for the order of the day, and moved that the House go into secret session, with a view to its consideration. The motion was carried, and the House went into secret session.
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