hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John H. Morgan 50 4 Browse Search
Grant 34 12 Browse Search
Jesse White 12 0 Browse Search
John J. Andrews 12 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Samuel Price 10 2 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Walker 6 0 Browse Search
Preussen 6 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 50 total hits in 25 results.

1 2 3
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ature of Ga., expressing a determination to prosecute the war with vigor. The communication and accompanying documents were ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved itself into secret legislative session. When the doors were reopened the Senate adjourned. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock by the Speaker. The Speaker announced the appointment of the following committees: Committee to inquire into outrages committed by the enemy in North Carolina--Messrs. Smith of N. C., Helcombe of Va., Smith of Ala., H. W. Bruce of Ky., and Bell of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va., McQueen of S. C., and Atkins of Tenn. The House then took up for consideration, as unfinished business, the bill reported from the Military Committee repealing existing and regulating future exemptions. Mr. Welch, of Miss., said that, as the cha
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
he motion of the gentleman from Mississippi. He thought it due to the Military Committee that this bill should be taken up and perfected. He certainly thought that, of the number of gentlemen composing the Military Committee, at least one might be found competent to engineer the bill through, even in the absence of the chairman. Mr. Singleton, of Miss., regretted the absence of the chairman of the Military Committee, but entirely concurred in the views expressed by the gentleman from Arkansas. He could see no necessity for postponing it. The question was called on the motion of Mr. Welch, and the House refused to postpone. Mr. Singleton, of Miss., offered an amendment to the bill, to come in after the word Governments, in the sixth line, to exempt physicians who have practiced their professions five years previous to the 11th day of October, 1862, and ministers of the Gospel who were in the regular exercise of their calling at the time above mentioned. Mr. Staple
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
Confederate States Congress. The Senate was opened with prayer by the Rev. Dr. Minnigerode, of the Episcopal Church. The President laid before the Senate a communication from Gov. Brown, of Ga., covering a copy of resolutions adopted by the Legislature of Ga., expressing a determination to prosecute the war with vigor. The communication and accompanying documents were ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved itself into secret legislative session. When the doors were reopened the Senate adjourned. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock by the Speaker. The Speaker announced the appointment of the following committees: Committee to inquire into outrages committed by the enemy in North Carolina--Messrs. Smith of N. C., Helcombe of Va., Smith of Ala., H. W. Bruce of Ky., and Bell of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va
is this that is destroying the vitalities of the army and the energies of the struggle.--He dwelt at much length upon this point, and said if the detailed men able to do military duty were put in the ranks, the deserters brought back, and the Exemption law-modified in many particulars, we would have an army able to cope with our adversaries.--Unless this was done — unless there was a change in the policy of the Government, we should have a protracted and bloody struggle — a struggle such as Prussia shed, when one-sixth of her whole male population perished upon the field of battle, when the authority of her magistrates and laws was suspended, and the horrors of pestilence and famine were added to the atrocities of war. But if the measure he indicated were adopted, he was satisfied the army would be so increased that another year would terminate the struggle; the clouds would pass away, and the bow of peace once more span the arch of the heavens." Mr. Dorgan, of Ala., also spoke i
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
o move an amendment to the bill by striking out all after the word "repeal," in the fourth line. He regarded this measure as a most dangerous one, and he would oppose it as he would the armies of the enemy. Mr. Hilton, of Florida, said he thought the fact stated by the gentleman from Mississippi, to wit: the absence of the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs, was a good reason for the temporary postponement of the bill. But as regards the announcement of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Foote) that when its consideration should be resumed he would move to strike out all after the enacting clause, and then propose its recommitment, he would state that he thought the gentleman, who had stated that he never had voted for an exemption bill passed by this House, who took exception to the action of the committee, instead of proposing to refer the matter back, he should himself frame and present a bill. He doubted whether the gentleman could frame a bill which in all its d
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
l of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va., McQueen of S. C., and Atkins of Tenn. The House then took up for consideration, as unfinished business, the bill reported from the Military Committee repealing existing and reme fate. He had voted against the proposition then, and there was nothing in the condition of the country, or in the reasoning of the honorable gentleman from So. Carolina, (Mr. Miles,) that would induce him to change the opinion then entertained. He (Mr. Staples) argued at considerable length to show that the Secretary of War ctoppage of so many callings and pursuits until the Secretary of War shall determine who shall be detailed, and for what purpose. The honorable gentleman from South Carolina says that Congress cannot agree upon a bill — that the Military Committee cannot agree upon a bill. The gentleman is mistaken. It may require time, but an a
opened the Senate adjourned. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock by the Speaker. The Speaker announced the appointment of the following committees: Committee to inquire into outrages committed by the enemy in North Carolina--Messrs. Smith of N. C., Helcombe of Va., Smith of Ala., H. W. Bruce of Ky., and Bell of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va., McQueen of S. C., anSmith of Ala., H. W. Bruce of Ky., and Bell of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va., McQueen of S. C., and Atkins of Tenn. The House then took up for consideration, as unfinished business, the bill reported from the Military Committee repealing existing and regulating future exemptions. Mr. Welch, of Miss., said that, as the chairman of the committee was absent, he moved to postpone the consideration of the bill to some future day. Mr. Foote signified his intention to move an amendment to the bill by striking out all after the word "repeal," in the fourth line. He regarded this mea
years previous to the 11th day of October, 1862, and ministers of the Gospel who were in the regular exercise of their calling at the time above mentioned. Mr. Staples, of Va., who was entitled to the floor, moved to recommit the bill and amendments to the Military Committee, and said that that committee, at the last session of the country, or in the reasoning of the honorable gentleman from So. Carolina, (Mr. Miles,) that would induce him to change the opinion then entertained. He (Mr. Staples) argued at considerable length to show that the Secretary of War could not perform the duties this bill would impose upon him; that he (the Secretary) would be or may resign, and I cannot tell who may be his successor. The liberties of a people are never safe when dependent upon the character or patriotism of one man. Mr. Staples insisted that the great abuses of the times did not grow out of the Exemption act.--They originated in the system of details allowed by the Government. Here is
Messrs Lyons (search for this): article 1
session. When the doors were reopened the Senate adjourned. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock by the Speaker. The Speaker announced the appointment of the following committees: Committee to inquire into outrages committed by the enemy in North Carolina--Messrs. Smith of N. C., Helcombe of Va., Smith of Ala., H. W. Bruce of Ky., and Bell of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va., McQueen of S. C., and Atkins of Tenn. The House then took up for consideration, as unfinished business, the bill reported from the Military Committee repealing existing and regulating future exemptions. Mr. Welch, of Miss., said that, as the chairman of the committee was absent, he moved to postpone the consideration of the bill to some future day. Mr. Foote signified his intention to move an amendment to the bill by striking out all after the word "repeal," in the
H. W. Bruce (search for this): article 1
r. The communication and accompanying documents were ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved itself into secret legislative session. When the doors were reopened the Senate adjourned. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock by the Speaker. The Speaker announced the appointment of the following committees: Committee to inquire into outrages committed by the enemy in North Carolina--Messrs. Smith of N. C., Helcombe of Va., Smith of Ala., H. W. Bruce of Ky., and Bell of Mo.; Committee, authorized by Mr. Foote's resolution, to inquire into the charge of corruption against a member of the House — Messrs Lyons of Va., McQueen of S. C., and Atkins of Tenn. The House then took up for consideration, as unfinished business, the bill reported from the Military Committee repealing existing and regulating future exemptions. Mr. Welch, of Miss., said that, as the chairman of the committee was absent, he moved to postpone the considerat
1 2 3