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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 7 results.

Christiansburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Confederacy — done it for the handsome figure of $1,200,000--and sloped. His operations were sales of bogus bills of sterling exchange. The Lynchburg Virginian gives the following account of this great swindle: "The bills were disposed of to various merchants and brokers of Richmond and other towns, and on being forwarded for collection the startling fact was brought to light that they were spurious. They, however, hear the endorsement of the Cashier of the Bank of the Valley at Christiansburg, which indemnifies the holders from loss, but will rum the Bank. The Cashier had such assurances as to make him perfectly confident of his safety in the transactions, but it turns out that they were diffusive. Among those who vouched for his responsibility, we hear the names of gentlemen in high station connected with the Government. "Decie, we believe claims to be an officer in the Royal Navy, and, we understand, had some connection with our Government. He has been residing for
Livingston (search for this): article 1
A mammoth swindle — Livingston thrown into the Shade — a Million and a Quarter gone up. The swindles of this war are carried on onas grand a scale as the war itself — both exceed anything yet accomplished in their respective lines. Capt. Decie, an Englishman, residing near the Montgomery. White Sulphur Springs has "recognized" the Confederacy — done it for the handsome figure of $1,200,000--and sloped. His operations were sales of bogus bills of sterling exchange. The Lynchburg Virginian gives the following account of this great swindle: "The bills were disposed of to various merchants and brokers of Richmond and other towns, and on being forwarded for collection the startling fact was brought to light that they were spurious. They, however, hear the endorsement of the Cashier of the Bank of the Valley at Christiansburg, which indemnifies the holders from loss, but will rum the Bank. The Cashier had such assurances as to make him perfectly confident of his safety in
Wadsworth (search for this): article 1
sponsibility, we hear the names of gentlemen in high station connected with the Government. "Decie, we believe claims to be an officer in the Royal Navy, and, we understand, had some connection with our Government. He has been residing for a year or two in Montgomery, where he owns a plantation, and has recently had elected a splendid residence. A great deal of his time, however, was spent in Richmond, where he lived in princely style, paying as much as one hundred and forty dollars a day at the hotels, besides taking his meals at the restaurants. His extravagance seemed to have no bounds. We hear the names of Wadsworth, Palmer & Co., Samuel Harrison, and — Foster, a broker, of Richmond, as among the victimized. Parties in Wilmington also suffered. Decie is supposed to have gone to England. He left fifteen or twenty negroes, farm furniture, etc., which have been stretched for the benefit of the sufferers. Other acts will no doubt be developed of this mammoth swindle. "
A mammoth swindle — Livingston thrown into the Shade — a Million and a Quarter gone up. The swindles of this war are carried on onas grand a scale as the war itself — both exceed anything yet accomplished in their respective lines. Capt. Decie, an Englishman, residing near the Montgomery. White Sulphur Springs has "recognized" the Confederacy — done it for the handsome figure of $1,200,000--and sloped. His operations were sales of bogus bills of sterling exchange. The Lynchburg Virginian gives the following account of this great swindle: "The bills were disposed of to various merchants and brokers of Richmond and other towns, and on being forwarded for collection the startling fact was brought to light that they were spurious. They, however, hear the endorsement of the Cashier of the Bank of the Valley at Christiansburg, which indemnifies the holders from loss, but will rum the Bank. The Cashier had such assurances as to make him perfectly confident of his safety in
esponsibility, we hear the names of gentlemen in high station connected with the Government. "Decie, we believe claims to be an officer in the Royal Navy, and, we understand, had some connection with our Government. He has been residing for a year or two in Montgomery, where he owns a plantation, and has recently had elected a splendid residence. A great deal of his time, however, was spent in Richmond, where he lived in princely style, paying as much as one hundred and forty dollars a day at the hotels, besides taking his meals at the restaurants. His extravagance seemed to have no bounds. We hear the names of Wadsworth, Palmer & Co., Samuel Harrison, and — Foster, a broker, of Richmond, as among the victimized. Parties in Wilmington also suffered. Decie is supposed to have gone to England. He left fifteen or twenty negroes, farm furniture, etc., which have been stretched for the benefit of the sufferers. Other acts will no doubt be developed of this mammoth swindle. "
Samuel Harrison (search for this): article 1
sponsibility, we hear the names of gentlemen in high station connected with the Government. "Decie, we believe claims to be an officer in the Royal Navy, and, we understand, had some connection with our Government. He has been residing for a year or two in Montgomery, where he owns a plantation, and has recently had elected a splendid residence. A great deal of his time, however, was spent in Richmond, where he lived in princely style, paying as much as one hundred and forty dollars a day at the hotels, besides taking his meals at the restaurants. His extravagance seemed to have no bounds. We hear the names of Wadsworth, Palmer & Co., Samuel Harrison, and — Foster, a broker, of Richmond, as among the victimized. Parties in Wilmington also suffered. Decie is supposed to have gone to England. He left fifteen or twenty negroes, farm furniture, etc., which have been stretched for the benefit of the sufferers. Other acts will no doubt be developed of this mammoth swindle. "
esponsibility, we hear the names of gentlemen in high station connected with the Government. "Decie, we believe claims to be an officer in the Royal Navy, and, we understand, had some connection with our Government. He has been residing for a year or two in Montgomery, where he owns a plantation, and has recently had elected a splendid residence. A great deal of his time, however, was spent in Richmond, where he lived in princely style, paying as much as one hundred and forty dollars a day at the hotels, besides taking his meals at the restaurants. His extravagance seemed to have no bounds. We hear the names of Wadsworth, Palmer & Co., Samuel Harrison, and — Foster, a broker, of Richmond, as among the victimized. Parties in Wilmington also suffered. Decie is supposed to have gone to England. He left fifteen or twenty negroes, farm furniture, etc., which have been stretched for the benefit of the sufferers. Other acts will no doubt be developed of this mammoth swindle. "