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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 01, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 13
my note, with profound regret, to your Government, you, nevertheless, do not controvert the principal positions assumed in that note. You do not deny, first, that it is lawful for her Majesty's subjects to lend money on securities, or otherwise, to either helligerent, or secondly, that it is also lawful to sell, to either belligerent, munitions of war. Upon this subject I beg to call to your notice that no longer ago than the 20th of last November, in answer to the remonstrance of Mexico against an alleged organized system in the United States of aiding France in the war in which she is engaged with that republic, but in which the United States are neutral, Mr. Seward replied by this, among other citations: [After quoting from Mr. Webster's dispatch to Mr. Thompson, Earl Russell proceeds]: It seems clear, on the principle enunclated in these authorities, that, except on the ground of any proved violation of the Foreign Enlistment act, her Majesty's Government canno
North America (search for this): article 13
ent thinks that the responsibility for that painful result will not fall upon the United States. England responsibilityEarl Russell to Mr. Adams Foreign Officer, Sept. 11, 1863. Sir --I have received your letter of the 5th inst., and have read it with great regret. It has been the aim of the Government of Great Britain to maintain a strict neutrality between the parties who for two years have carried on a civil war of unusual extent and loss of life on the continent of North America. Her Majesty's Government have, for the most part, succeeded in this impartial course. If they have been unable to prevent some violations of neutrality on the part of the Queen's subjects, the cause has been that Great Britain is a country which is governed by definite laws, and is not subject to arbitrary will. But law, as you are well aware, is enforced here, as in the United States, by independent courts of justice, which will not admit assertion for proof, nor conjecture for
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 13
loaned are paid to British subjects residing in Great Britain for advances in money, labor, arms, military stoeen's proclamation and of the enlistment acts of Great Britain, as well as of treaties and the law of nations. d States, and apparently so universally known in Great Britain, have arrested the attention of her Majesty's Gokness and good faith if we should fall to inform Great Britain that in this country the proceedings to which I esident believes is as far from being desired by Great Britain as it is from being the policy or the wish of ththe Alexandra. * * * * * * If the law of Great Britain must be left without amendment, and be construedt. It has been the aim of the Government of Great Britain to maintain a strict neutrality between the partof the Queen's subjects, the cause has been that Great Britain is a country which is governed by definite laws,d faith and character of a Power so honorable as Great Britain. These matters will no doubt, be duty and d
Birkenhead (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 13
n of the United States, London, Sept. 3, 1863. My Lord: I have the honor to transmit copies of further depositions relating to the launching and other preparation of the second of the two vessels-of-war from the yard of Messrs. Laird, at Birkenhead, concerning which it has already been my disagreeable duty to make most serious representations to her Majesty's Government. I believe there is not any reasonable ground for doubt that these vessels, if permitted to leave the port of Liverou are well aware, is enforced here, as in the United States, by independent courts of justice, which will not admit assertion for proof, nor conjecture for certainty. * * * * * * In the case still pending of the iron clad steam rams at Birkenhead, Mr. Seward, with his knowledge and perspicuity of judgment, cannot fall to acknowledge that it was necessary to show not only that these vessels were built and equipped for purposes of war, but also that they were intended for the so called Co
China (China) (search for this): article 13
upon inquiry, assurances, through Earl Cowley and the Marquis of Cadors, that the French Government have nothing to do with the Birkenhead iron clads. In respect to the Egyptian Government, it was only on the 5th instant that her Majesty's Government received a dispatch from Mr. Colquhon, her Majesty's Consul General in Egypt, which is conclusive on this subject. Ismail Pacha refused to purchase these vessels. From this example, and that of the vessels built for the Emperor of China, whose name was alleged all over the United States to be a mere sham to cover, the real destination of the vessels, the President will gather how necessary it is to be dispassionate and careful in inquiries and statements upon subjects involving such great interests, and affecting the good faith and character of a Power so honorable as Great Britain. These matters will no doubt, be duty and dispassionately considered by the Government at Washington, however they may have been understood
France (France) (search for this): article 13
ther belligerent, munitions of war. Upon this subject I beg to call to your notice that no longer ago than the 20th of last November, in answer to the remonstrance of Mexico against an alleged organized system in the United States of aiding France in the war in which she is engaged with that republic, but in which the United States are neutral, Mr. Seward replied by this, among other citations: [After quoting from Mr. Webster's dispatch to Mr. Thompson, Earl Russell proceeds]: It object of carrying on war against the United States of America. I have taken the necessary measures in the proper quarters to ascertain the truth of the respective statements current here, that they are intended for the use of the Government of France or for the Pacha of Egypt, and have found both without foundation. At this moment neither of those Powers appears to have occasion to use conceatment or equivocation in regard to its intentions, had it any in obtaining such ships. In the notes
United States (United States) (search for this): article 13
g this war than the "recognition" of the Confederate States. The cotton loan.Mr. Seward to Mr. As from being the policy or the wish of the United States. After the resort to the courts of the Un direct hostility to the Government of the United States. I have now the honor to observe to yve had the opportunity to receive from the United States a full approbation of its contents. At thExchequer, then there will be left for the United States no alternative but to protect themselves ave their prisoners when the enemies of the United States come in to obtain such relief from voyagesof the British Government, the navy of the United States will receive instructions to pursue these tion upon the Government and people of the United States--a war tolerated, although not declared orre well aware, is enforced here, as in the United States, by independent courts of justice, which wChina, whose name was alleged all over the United States to be a mere sham to cover, the real desti[17 more...]
Correspondence between England and America about British neutrality. The Northern papers publish the diplomatic correspondence between Seward and Russell upon the subject of the cotton loan, Confederate cruisers, steam rams, &c. To show how completely England has been bullied by the Yankees in this matter we print a portion of the letters. With such timidity as is shown by the British Government, we may well be satisfied that nothing has been further from its intentions during this war tEngland has been bullied by the Yankees in this matter we print a portion of the letters. With such timidity as is shown by the British Government, we may well be satisfied that nothing has been further from its intentions during this war than the "recognition" of the Confederate States. The cotton loan.Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Department of State, Washington, April 10, 1863. * * * * This Government has heard with surprise and regret that a loan has been made in London to the insurgents, with conditions of security and payment openly hostile to the United States, and it has good reasons for assuming that most or all of the moneys thus loaned are paid to British subjects residing in Great Britain for advances in money,
Earl Russell (search for this): article 13
Correspondence between England and America about British neutrality. The Northern papers publish the diplomatic correspondence between Seward and Russell upon the subject of the cotton loan, Confederate cruisers, steam rams, &c. To show how completely England has been bullied by the Yankees in this matter we print a portion of the letters. With such timidity as is shown by the British Government, we may well be satisfied that nothing has been further from its intentions during this war t United States by either of these formidable vessels. I pray your lordship to accept the assurances of the highest consideration with which I have the honor to be, my lord, your most obedient servant, Charles Frascis Adams. Right Honorable Earl Russell, &c., &c. Earl Russell to Mr. Adams. Foreign Office, Sept. 8, 1863. Lord Russell presents his compliments to Mr. Adams, and has the honor to inform him that instructions have been issued which will prevent the departure of th
Charles Frascis Adams (search for this): article 13
federate States. The cotton loan.Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Department of State, Washington, April 10, 1863 of her Majesty's Government. Earl Russell to Mr. Adams. Foreign Office, April 2, 1863. Sir --Hernd goods, or even ships for warlike purposes. Mr. Adams to Earl Russell. Legation of the United States, ional character. * * * * * * Laird's ramsMr. Adams to Earl Russell. Legation of the United States, be, my lord, your most obedient servant, Charles Frascis Adams. Right Honorable Earl Russell, &c., &c. Earl Russell to Mr. Adams. Foreign Office, Sept. 8, 1863. Lord Russell presents his compliments to MMr. Adams, and has the honor to inform him that instructions have been issued which will prevent the departure o The fitting out of the Alexandra.Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Department of State, Washington, July 11th, 186States. England responsibilityEarl Russell to Mr. Adams Foreign Officer, Sept. 11, 1863. Sir --I
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