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s river three miles above the railroad depot. They charged Colonel Jackson's small guard at the turnpike bridge, four miles above the depot, crossed it, and burned it behind them, as you know, and continuing their march rapidly through Covington burned also the bridge over Jackson's river at that place. Marching by Callahan's, they left the White Sulphur road two miles beyond that stand at Mrs. Lockhart's. Taking to a mere bridle path, as it were, they fled across the mountain and reached Anthony's creek, in Greenbrier, where they continued their robberies on that and Little creek probably as much from necessity as inclination. The weather was dreadfully Inclement, and their trains and supplies were gone. Many were frosted. Averill himself was reduced to the necessity of clothing his frostbitten feet in sheep skin, the wool turned in. They stripped the country of provisions and horses, and the houses of bed covering and clothing. In one house there was one person sick, but conva
Horses, provender, meat — everything was taken from the aged widow. The next theatre of their exploits was at the two Sweet Springs — the Red, now owned by Mr. Kelley, and the Old Sweet, by Mr. Oliver Belrue. The valley just at these springs is one of the riched in the world. There was more forage here than the invaders could consume or carry away. They used and took all they could, as they did of grain. Mr. Kelley was killing hogs as they came up, and they found a scaffold filled with fat hogs already butchered to their hand, and these they helped themselves to at once. They took all of Mr. Kelley's horses and mules, his wagon, a negro boy, and Mr. Kelley's horses and mules, his wagon, a negro boy, and some of his gearing, wantonly cutting up that belonging to his carriage and all that they did not carry off. Gen. Averill, however, put a guard be fore the entrances to the houses and kept the men from intruding into them. Mr. Beirne was treated with singular brutality. His houses were ransacked — his stores pillaged — all
ding into them. Mr. Beirne was treated with singular brutality. His houses were ransacked — his stores pillaged — all his meat (several thousand pounds) taken — all his liquors and wines appropriated by the plundering soldiery — His watch violently taken from his person — all his horses carried off. His place was well stripped of all that the Yankees desired or could convey away. Continuing their march rapidly, they picked up several horses at Kylets, and appropriated the most of Mr. Kyle's grain. His negroes refused to follow them. Their worst acts of brutality were perpetrated at Mrs. Scott's another of the good mountain inns of olden time. Mrs. S. is a true Southern woman, and has two or more sons in the army. Year before last the demands of our own soldiers, in passing over the road by her house, mountain us and thinly populated as it is, were such that all her supplies were gone before the year was half expired, and in the inst spring her losses of cattle for
e officer had in another package. Honor to this young lady. True, courageous, and even cheerful amidst the severest trials, she deserves honorable distinction in times like these, which try alike the souls of women and men. None but the brave deserve this fair. I cannot follow the route of Averill all the way. I only cite instances as Illustrative of the brutalities of his raid. He was pioneered by some traitors who had lived in Virginia. Among them two stage drivers, named Hall and Mooney, who had driven stages in the mountains. As a sort of apology for excesses at Mrs. Scott's — which even Yankees thought needed some apology — It was alleged that Miss S. had some time ago hung out a Confederate flag ! The main army turned to the right below Scott's for Salem. A detachment of 100 continued down the Fincastle road to a field near Craig's Creek, some four miles, where 130 C. S. horses were at pasture. They captured three of the guard that had charge of them and set fire
February 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 11
A Journey in the Tracks of Averill. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Fincastle, Feb. 3, 1864. I write you this letter on the subject of Averlips raid in November, to notice some facts illustrating the cruelty and barbarity of that incursion of the enemy, not before brought to light. Averill's November raid was amongst the most unscrupulous and the most destructive of private property which have taken place in Virginia. In its march towards Salem we hear of nothing especially interesting until it emerged from the Alleghenies at Callahan's, the famous old stand at the base of those mountains. This point they had visited several times before, always helping them selves to some of the moveables and supplies thereabouts. In their advance and retreat on this expedition they left Mr. Dixon, the proprietor, little save his land and houses. Proceeding rapidly up Dunlop's creek, they entered the Sweet Springs road at Crow's, that other famous stage stand of other day
A Journey in the Tracks of Averill. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Fincastle, Feb. 3, 1864. I write you this letter on the subject of Averlips raid in November, to notice some facts illustrating the cruelty and barbarity of that incursion of the enemy, not before brought to light. Averill's November raid was amongst the most unscrupulous and the most destructive of private property which have taken place in Virginia. In its march towards Salem we hear of nothing especNovember raid was amongst the most unscrupulous and the most destructive of private property which have taken place in Virginia. In its march towards Salem we hear of nothing especially interesting until it emerged from the Alleghenies at Callahan's, the famous old stand at the base of those mountains. This point they had visited several times before, always helping them selves to some of the moveables and supplies thereabouts. In their advance and retreat on this expedition they left Mr. Dixon, the proprietor, little save his land and houses. Proceeding rapidly up Dunlop's creek, they entered the Sweet Springs road at Crow's, that other famous stage stand of other day
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