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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 9, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Fincastle (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
A Journey in the Tracks of Averill. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Fincastle, Feb. 3, 1864. I write you this letter on the subject of Averlips raid in November, to notice some facts illustrating the cruelty and barbarity of that incursion of the enemy, not before brought to light. Averill's November raid was amongst the most unscrupulous and the most destructive of private property which have taken place in Virginia. In its march towards Salem we hear of nothing espe Mrs. Scott's — which even Yankees thought needed some apology — It was alleged that Miss S. had some time ago hung out a Confederate flag ! The main army turned to the right below Scott's for Salem. A detachment of 100 continued down the Fincastle road to a field near Craig's Creek, some four miles, where 130 C. S. horses were at pasture. They captured three of the guard that had charge of them and set fire to an unoccupied dwelling to illumine the field so that they could gather up the
Randolph (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
eek, both leading north to Jackson's river. But when he reached that river he would still have been entrapped but for the unfortunate turning back towards Buchanan by Gen. F. Lee, misted by a false dispatch. But Averill is a man of undoubted energy; and though he carried no fruits along with him of his raid save the eclat of his escape, he has desolated the country along his march, and seriously straitened the people for the means of subsistence. His own army reached his headquarters in Randolph in the most wretched plight imaginable. His last two horse wagon was captured in Greenbrier by our scouts, and he returned but to fill his hospitals with his sick and disabled followers. Few tragedies are without their comic and grotesque interludes. And Averill's devastating march had its farce. On the very top of Price's or Eleven Mile Mountain as it is sometimes called, dwells a widow woman with a considerable family including several grandchildren. She seems to defy the element
Pocahontas (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
midnight. En route this party plundered Major McCartney's house, taking clothing, a gold watch, liquor, horses, &c; but having no transportation they returned without carrying off much that required it You know all about the doings at Salem, their retreat to Jackson's river and final escape via Covington. They continued their depredations with more or less vigor in proportion to their time and opportunities. They departed in haste, lost all their wagons, and appeared finally in Pocahontas county without a single wagon. They burned no railroad bridge on Jackson's river. They turned off from the Sweet Springs road at Mrs. Scott's in their retreat, and moving up Barbour's crock at the foot of Price's mountain crossed over the Rich Patch into Alleghany, striking Jackson's river three miles above the railroad depot. They charged Colonel Jackson's small guard at the turnpike bridge, four miles above the depot, crossed it, and burned it behind them, as you know, and continuing the
Craig's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
rutalities of his raid. He was pioneered by some traitors who had lived in Virginia. Among them two stage drivers, named Hall and Mooney, who had driven stages in the mountains. As a sort of apology for excesses at Mrs. Scott's — which even Yankees thought needed some apology — It was alleged that Miss S. had some time ago hung out a Confederate flag ! The main army turned to the right below Scott's for Salem. A detachment of 100 continued down the Fincastle road to a field near Craig's Creek, some four miles, where 130 C. S. horses were at pasture. They captured three of the guard that had charge of them and set fire to an unoccupied dwelling to illumine the field so that they could gather up the horses, it being midnight. En route this party plundered Major McCartney's house, taking clothing, a gold watch, liquor, horses, &c; but having no transportation they returned without carrying off much that required it You know all about the doings at Salem, their retreat to
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 11
Averill's November raid was amongst the most unscrupulous and the most destructive of private property which have taken place in Virginia. In its march towards Salem we hear of nothing especially interesting until it emerged from the Alleghenies at Callahan's, the famous old stand at the base of those mountains. This point the thought needed some apology — It was alleged that Miss S. had some time ago hung out a Confederate flag ! The main army turned to the right below Scott's for Salem. A detachment of 100 continued down the Fincastle road to a field near Craig's Creek, some four miles, where 130 C. S. horses were at pasture. They captured threhing, a gold watch, liquor, horses, &c; but having no transportation they returned without carrying off much that required it You know all about the doings at Salem, their retreat to Jackson's river and final escape via Covington. They continued their depredations with more or less vigor in proportion to their time and opport
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
s house, taking clothing, a gold watch, liquor, horses, &c; but having no transportation they returned without carrying off much that required it You know all about the doings at Salem, their retreat to Jackson's river and final escape via Covington. They continued their depredations with more or less vigor in proportion to their time and opportunities. They departed in haste, lost all their wagons, and appeared finally in Pocahontas county without a single wagon. They burned no railroaJackson's river three miles above the railroad depot. They charged Colonel Jackson's small guard at the turnpike bridge, four miles above the depot, crossed it, and burned it behind them, as you know, and continuing their march rapidly through Covington burned also the bridge over Jackson's river at that place. Marching by Callahan's, they left the White Sulphur road two miles beyond that stand at Mrs. Lockhart's. Taking to a mere bridle path, as it were, they fled across the mountain and rea
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): article 11
ight. Averill's November raid was amongst the most unscrupulous and the most destructive of private property which have taken place in Virginia. In its march towards Salem we hear of nothing especially interesting until it emerged from the Alleghenies at Callahan's, the famous old stand at the base of those mountains. This point they had visited several times before, always helping them selves to some of the moveables and supplies thereabouts. In their advance and retreat on this expedi his widow, who still resides there. She has a son or two in the war, and was still offering, in a limited manner, rest and food for the traveller — her means for that purpose being like those of all other publicans in the narrow valleys of the Alleghenies, greatly reduced by the war. The main body of the Yankees paused for the night there and literally cleared the establishment of everything, so that there is no longer a mouthful for man or beast, and the traveller goes hungry and tired by a
White Sulphur (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
cott's in their retreat, and moving up Barbour's crock at the foot of Price's mountain crossed over the Rich Patch into Alleghany, striking Jackson's river three miles above the railroad depot. They charged Colonel Jackson's small guard at the turnpike bridge, four miles above the depot, crossed it, and burned it behind them, as you know, and continuing their march rapidly through Covington burned also the bridge over Jackson's river at that place. Marching by Callahan's, they left the White Sulphur road two miles beyond that stand at Mrs. Lockhart's. Taking to a mere bridle path, as it were, they fled across the mountain and reached Anthony's creek, in Greenbrier, where they continued their robberies on that and Little creek probably as much from necessity as inclination. The weather was dreadfully Inclement, and their trains and supplies were gone. Many were frosted. Averill himself was reduced to the necessity of clothing his frostbitten feet in sheep skin, the wool turned in.
Sweet Springs (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
ce and retreat on this expedition they left Mr. Dixon, the proprietor, little save his land and houses. Proceeding rapidly up Dunlop's creek, they entered the Sweet Springs road at Crow's, that other famous stage stand of other days, where the traveller was so eager to pause, ever sure of a most palatable and refreshing repast, ofd reach the mercies of the Yankees. Horses, provender, meat — everything was taken from the aged widow. The next theatre of their exploits was at the two Sweet Springs — the Red, now owned by Mr. Kelley, and the Old Sweet, by Mr. Oliver Belrue. The valley just at these springs is one of the riched in the world. There was mol their wagons, and appeared finally in Pocahontas county without a single wagon. They burned no railroad bridge on Jackson's river. They turned off from the Sweet Springs road at Mrs. Scott's in their retreat, and moving up Barbour's crock at the foot of Price's mountain crossed over the Rich Patch into Alleghany, striking Jacks
ons, and appeared finally in Pocahontas county without a single wagon. They burned no railroad bridge on Jackson's river. They turned off from the Sweet Springs road at Mrs. Scott's in their retreat, and moving up Barbour's crock at the foot of Price's mountain crossed over the Rich Patch into Alleghany, striking Jackson's river three miles above the railroad depot. They charged Colonel Jackson's small guard at the turnpike bridge, four miles above the depot, crossed it, and burned it behind in Greenbrier by our scouts, and he returned but to fill his hospitals with his sick and disabled followers. Few tragedies are without their comic and grotesque interludes. And Averill's devastating march had its farce. On the very top of Price's or Eleven Mile Mountain as it is sometimes called, dwells a widow woman with a considerable family including several grandchildren. She seems to defy the elements of the most tempestuous height I know of. Up to this elevated position, where ev
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