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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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R. S. Davis (search for this): article 1
ollowing special order is published by order of the commanding General: W. W. Shore, being by his own confession the correspondent of the New York Daily World and Daily Times, the articles and letters from which papers are copied with approbation into many of the rebel papers to the injury of the Government and the cause of the country, is ordered to leave the department forthwith, and not to return under pain of being put to hard, but honest, labor. By order of Major Gen. Butler. R. S. Davis, Major and A. A. G. The campaign in the Southwest--the advance of Hurlburt and M'Pherson. The Federal force which is now advancing into East Mississippi, and before which in retiring Gen Polk has evacuated Meridian, is under the command of Gen Sherman, and consists of two army corps--the 16th and 17th, under Hurlbut and McPherson. The cavalry to attend the expedition left Memphis for Corinth on the 3d inst. The St Louis Republican, commenting upon the movements in that quarter, s
ebs" didn't come. They having accomplished their work, retired without molestation. The forces at the bridges which made the capture have been variously estimated at from sixty to two thousand five hundred men. They captured one company of the 54th Pennsylvania troops that was guarding the bridges. Casualties--one killed, one mortally, and several slightly wounded, of the Federals. Confederates none. Our forces bivouacked on the chosen field, awaiting the approach of the rebels; but Rosser, having accomplished his work, was fast skedaddling to a place of safety. Pursuit then commenced, but our forces managed to keep just far enough in the rear of the rebels not to provoke a collision. We lost all — about one hundred and seven wagons, heavily laden with rations, clothing, and munitions of war; also, the motive power of this immense train, consisting of five hundred or six hundred horses and mules; also, several cannon and quite a number of prisoners, "gobbled" up on the route
From New York papers of the 11th inst. we take some additional intelligence: Gen. Butler's Blunder — the late Attack on Richmond — some one has blundered again. The late movement on Richmond is acknowledged to have been a failure, and old Butler is in a worse humor than when he run against Magruder at Bethel. The foButler is in a worse humor than when he run against Magruder at Bethel. The following telegrams tell the tale: Washington, Feb. 10.--The civilians and political critics of the army are indignant that the late dash in the direction of Richmond should be attended with such signal failure. Their plans were all perfect, and they cannot see how the error occurred. A number of excited individuals have beend the cause of the country, is ordered to leave the department forthwith, and not to return under pain of being put to hard, but honest, labor. By order of Major Gen. Butler. R. S. Davis, Major and A. A. G. The campaign in the Southwest--the advance of Hurlburt and M'Pherson. The Federal force which is now advancing int
r points, have reached Vicksburg. They are expected to go eastward and southward, and form a junction with the column, and with a force setting out from Natchez, Jackson, the capital of Mississippi, will probably be abandoned by the enemy without a fight. Some formidable resistance might be made to our occupation of the city, as f the enemy at present in Virginia may be thrown into Georgia and East Tennessee, Gen. Sherman will be cautious in going southward from that line which intersects Jackson, Meridian, Selma, and Montgomery. It seems plain that Gen. Sherman's troops in the field should, after securing Jackson, proceed due east to Meridian, the junctiJackson, proceed due east to Meridian, the junction of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad with the Southern Mississippi. From Vicksburg to Meridian the distance is one hundred and forty miles, which is about equal to the distance from Meridian to Mobile. We suppose that the railroad connecting Meridian with the base of supplies at Vicksburg can be rapidly placed in running order
A. J. Smith (search for this): article 1
vable in Gen Sherman's and Gen Banks's department. Quite a number of troops have been concentrated in the vicinity of Vicksburg, and already our lines have been advanced towards Jackson, as far as the Big Black. Posts on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad have been abandoned, and the garrisons, including those at Corinth and luka, brought in. The 15th army corps, Major Gen Hurlburt, has been organized for field duty into four divisions, commanded respectively by Generals Tuttle, Dodge, A. J. Smith and Ventch. Besides the 16th preparations for the campaign have been made in the 13th and 17th corps. A great cavalry expedition has also been arranged, under Gen W. L. Smith, General Grant's Chief of Cavalry, for a raid into the interior of Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, and has, we learn, already moved upon Holly Springs, going down the line of the Mississippi Central Railroad. Troops from Cairo, Columbus, Moscow, Grand Junction, Memphis, and other points, have reached Vicksburg.
January 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
wagons, heavily laden with rations, clothing, and munitions of war; also, the motive power of this immense train, consisting of five hundred or six hundred horses and mules; also, several cannon and quite a number of prisoners, "gobbled" up on the route, and especially on the field where the train was captured. For the last three months the Confederates have drawn large supplies from this department. On the 16th November, 1863, they captured a valuable train and stores. On the 3d of January, 1864, another train was shoved off on the Lane road; the last that was taken was the most valuable of all.--One million of dollars would not replace the loss by the last raid. The excitement has subsided, but the disgrace remains. We have again relapsed into fancied security, but we know not what minute the raiders may be upon us. The Yankee prisoners at Richmond — their treatment. The New York World has the following editorial on the subject of the treatment of the prisoners who
C. C. Fulton (search for this): article 1
nkee prisoners at Richmond — their treatment. The New York World has the following editorial on the subject of the treatment of the prisoners who are now held in Richmond. The fifty Union surgeons we think are myths: The statement of Mr. C. C. Fulton, proprietor of the Baltimore American, which we publish this morning, respecting the treatment of our prisoners at Richmond will be a sensible relief to their friends at the North. It seems that the country has been imposed upon respecting es not wish an exchange of prisoners, and that it has so conducted matters as to convey to the country the impression that the rebels were ill treating their prisoners whereas the parties really to blame have been themselves. The statements of Mr. Fulton, who is an ardent supporter of the Administration, are of a character which should command the prompt attention of Congress. If anything is to be done for our prisoners, it must be in spite of the efforts of the Administration to compel them t
Daily Times (search for this): article 1
onduct of the war to report to morrow that somebody has blundered, so that the shortcomings of the military officials may be ventilated and another sacrifice be made. Washington, Feb. 10.--Rumors prevail of the arrest of prominent officers who had the late raid on Richmond in charge. Fortress Monroe,Feb. 10.--The following special order is published by order of the commanding General: W. W. Shore, being by his own confession the correspondent of the New York Daily World and Daily Times, the articles and letters from which papers are copied with approbation into many of the rebel papers to the injury of the Government and the cause of the country, is ordered to leave the department forthwith, and not to return under pain of being put to hard, but honest, labor. By order of Major Gen. Butler. R. S. Davis, Major and A. A. G. The campaign in the Southwest--the advance of Hurlburt and M'Pherson. The Federal force which is now advancing into East Mississippi, and
nds at the North. It seems that the country has been imposed upon respecting the treatment the prisoners receive from the rebel authorities.--While it is no doubt true that the rations are scant, and their accommodations not such as they would receive at the North, it seems they are not either starved or ill-treated. It will surprise the country also to learn that the rebel Government anxious to do what it could for the sick and wounded soldiers in Richmond, has made an offer through Commissioner Ould to allow at least fifty Union surgeons through their lines, and all the provisions, medicines and stores they chose to bring with them; which offer has been treated by Secretary Stanton with contemptuous silence, it follows, therefore, that if there is any suffering among the disabled soldiers now in Richmond, it is due, not to the Confederate Government, which has done, in view of the scant means, what it could to make them comfortable; but to President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton,
November 16th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
s not to provoke a collision. We lost all — about one hundred and seven wagons, heavily laden with rations, clothing, and munitions of war; also, the motive power of this immense train, consisting of five hundred or six hundred horses and mules; also, several cannon and quite a number of prisoners, "gobbled" up on the route, and especially on the field where the train was captured. For the last three months the Confederates have drawn large supplies from this department. On the 16th November, 1863, they captured a valuable train and stores. On the 3d of January, 1864, another train was shoved off on the Lane road; the last that was taken was the most valuable of all.--One million of dollars would not replace the loss by the last raid. The excitement has subsided, but the disgrace remains. We have again relapsed into fancied security, but we know not what minute the raiders may be upon us. The Yankee prisoners at Richmond — their treatment. The New York World has the f
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