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United States (United States) (search for this): article 8
Additional from the North. The United States Presidential. Imbrog to in the Cabinet — Trouble Ahead. The New York Herald has the following article upon the divisions among the Presidential aspirants in that country: The scorching manifesto of Senator Pomeroy and his committee against Abraham Lincoln as a candidate for, illustration of the condition of things that the question of who shall be allowed to preach in a church in St. Louis shall be decided by the President of the United States!" Now, all this sounds very strangely, and, wish, a little as if you gentlemen, making the application, do not understand the case alike, one affirming thch or out of it, becomes dangerous to the public interest, he must be checked, but the churches, as such, must take care of themselves. It will not do for the United States to appoint trustees, supervisors, or other agents, for the churches." This letter going to General Carlis, then in command, I supposed, of course, it was
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 8
nd they will see the fur fly. Senator Pomeroy thus speaks with the leading abolition radicals, and with New York at his back, in denouncing the shortcomings of Old Abe, and in pronouncing against him as a candidate for another term. President Lincoln has had some show of strength from various State Legislatures; but while New York and Ohio stand dead against him his footing is insecure. How the States endorsing him have been manipulated may be connected from the operendt adopted in Pennsylvania Hon. Simon Cameron manages the Republicans in the Legislature of that State as the colonel of a regiment controls his men. With the statement, therefore, after the vote of confidence in Abraham Lincoln given by the Pennsylvania Legislature, that Mr. Cameron is to stand for our next Vice President on the Lincoln ticket, we get at the milk in that coconut. But all these nice manipulations will be apt to fall in the party convention.--The President wishes an immense amount of patronage, an
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 8
in three hours after the attack on the Housatonic all hands that were saved were safely transferred to that ship, where they received every attention. Subsequently a portion of the survivors were transferred to the Wabash. The Gousatonic is a total loss. All hands lost all they possessed — money, clothes, &c. In fact many of them, including some of the officers, went on board of the Canandaigua in a naked state. A sad accident of the disaster in the loss of Ensign Hazleton, of Concord, New Hampshire; Mr. Mezzey, Captain's Clerk; John Williams, Quartermaster, and John Welsh, coal-heaver, of Boston, were drowned. The latter had got safely on the deck, but ventured back to save $900, which he had in his bag on the berth deck. Poer fellow, he never returned. Theo Parker, (colored,) who was on the lookout directly over where the ship was struck, was blown late the air and instantly killed. Capt. Pickerang was slightly injured by the explosion. John Goff, the Captain's steward, w
cississtical rights are withdrawn. Your letter states that Provost Marshal Dick, about a year ago, ordered the arrest of Dr. McPhesters, pastor of the Vine Street Church prohibited him from officiating, and placed the management of the affairs of the church out of the control of its chosen and near the close you state that a certain course "would insure his release." Mr. Ranney's letter says: "Dr. Samuel McPhesters is enjoying all the rights of a civilian, but cannot preach the Gospel!" Mr. Coalter, in his letter, asks; "Is it not a strange, illustration of the condition of things that the question of who shall be allowed to preach in a church in St. Louis shall be decided by the President of the United States!" Now, all this sounds very strangely, and, wish, a little as if you gentlemen, making the application, do not understand the case alike, one affirming that his Doctor is enjoying all the rights of a civilian, and another pointing out to me what will secure the release! O
Thurlow Weed (search for this): article 8
ille the other, day closed its proceedings with a set of anti Lincoln resolutions. Wendell Phillips and his Abolition pioneers, after turning and twisting Old Abe in every possible way, give him up in despair as a trimmer, a temporizer, a blunderer, and a bad bargain. Greeley and the New York radical entertain the same ideas; but Greeley desires to shelve Old Abe as quietly as possible, so as not to disturb the peace of the happy family. But only let Mr. Seward and his good man Friday, Thurlow Weed, try the experiment of a set of Lincoln nominating resolutions in the New York Legislature, and they will see the fur fly. Senator Pomeroy thus speaks with the leading abolition radicals, and with New York at his back, in denouncing the shortcomings of Old Abe, and in pronouncing against him as a candidate for another term. President Lincoln has had some show of strength from various State Legislatures; but while New York and Ohio stand dead against him his footing is insecure. How
ll not do for the United States to appoint trustees, supervisors, or other agents, for the churches." This letter going to General Carlis, then in command, I supposed, of course, it was obeyed, especially as I heard no further complaint from Dr. Mc or his friends for nearly an entire year. I have never interfered, not thought of interfering, as to who shall or shall not preach in any church; nor have I knowingly or be livingly intreated any one else so to interferes by any authority. If a to who shall or shall not preach in any church; nor have I knowingly or be livingly intreated any one else so to interferes by any authority. If any one is so interfering by color of my authority, I would like to have it specifically made known to me. If, after all, what is now sought is to have me put Dr. Mc. back, over the heads of a majesty of his own congregation, that, too, will be declined. I will not have control of any church on any side. Yours, respectfully, A. Lincoln.
n, Washington, December 23, 1863. I have just looked over a petition signed by some three dozen citizens of St. Louis and their accompanying letter, one by yourself, one by a Mr. Nathan Rauney, and by a Mr. John D. Cealter--the whole relating to the Rev. Dr. McPhesters. The petition prays in the came of justices and mercy, that will restore Dr. McPhesters to all his rights. This gives no intimation as to what eccississtical rights are withdrawn. Your letter states that Provost Marshal Dick, about a year ago, ordered the arrest of Dr. McPhesters, pastor of the Vine Street Church prohibited him from officiating, and placed the management of the affairs of the church out of the control of its chosen and near the close you state that a certain course "would insure his release." Mr. Ranney's letter says: "Dr. Samuel McPhesters is enjoying all the rights of a civilian, but cannot preach the Gospel!" Mr. Coalter, in his letter, asks; "Is it not a strange, illustration of the
John Goff (search for this): article 8
nsign Hazleton, of Concord, New Hampshire; Mr. Mezzey, Captain's Clerk; John Williams, Quartermaster, and John Welsh, coal-heaver, of Boston, were drowned. The latter had got safely on the deck, but ventured back to save $900, which he had in his bag on the berth deck. Poer fellow, he never returned. Theo Parker, (colored,) who was on the lookout directly over where the ship was struck, was blown late the air and instantly killed. Capt. Pickerang was slightly injured by the explosion. John Goff, the Captain's steward, was same what injured. These were all the casualties. The officers and men of the ship displayed the greatest coolness during the trying scene, and thereby saved many lives. The Housatoale has been the especial spite of the rebels. Three times they have tried to destroy her, and now they have succeeded. It is feared that many others of the vessels on the blockade will follow the fate of the Housasouis — It is well known that the rebels have six or eight mor
special spite of the rebels. Three times they have tried to destroy her, and now they have succeeded. It is feared that many others of the vessels on the blockade will follow the fate of the Housasouis — It is well known that the rebels have six or eight more of these infernal machines ready to pounce upon the fleet. The masts of the Housatonic are all that can be seen of her, and the gale which is now prevailing will do much to make a complete wreck of that once noble ship. Ensign Hamilton got into the second beat, and had he remained in it would have been saved; but as the ship careened over he jumped on The last ever seen of him he was floating among the fragments of the wreck, a corpse. At low tide the water is about six feet above the rail of the Housatonic. If the weather monocracy her guns and many valuable articles and the paymaster's safe will be recovered. She cannot be raised, as her stern is completely blown off, She was with coal and provisions, whi
State Convention which met at Louisville the other, day closed its proceedings with a set of anti Lincoln resolutions. Wendell Phillips and his Abolition pioneers, after turning and twisting Old Abe in every possible way, give him up in despair as a trimmer, a temporizer, a blunderer, and a bad bargain. Greeley and the New York radical entertain the same ideas; but Greeley desires to shelve Old Abe as quietly as possible, so as not to disturb the peace of the happy family. But only let Mr. Seward and his good man Friday, Thurlow Weed, try the experiment of a set of Lincoln nominating resolutions in the New York Legislature, and they will see the fur fly. Senator Pomeroy thus speaks with the leading abolition radicals, and with New York at his back, in denouncing the shortcomings of Old Abe, and in pronouncing against him as a candidate for another term. President Lincoln has had some show of strength from various State Legislatures; but while New York and Ohio stand dead again
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