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Robert E. Lee (search for this): article 1
ensburg. McLaws's division, notwithstanding this delay, reached Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg, soon after dark on the evening of the 1st July. Hood's division got within nearly the same distance by the same time, (except Law's brigade, which had been on picket at Guildford, on the road to Emmittsburg, and returned about noon on the 2d) General Pickett had not yet gotten up. About noon of the 2d Lieut. Gen Longstreet began a movement which he had previously been ordered by Gen, Lee to make, viz: To move around and gain the Emmittsburg road on the enemy's left. The enemy having been driven back by the corps of Lieuts Gen Ewell and Hill on the first day, had taken up a strong position extending from Cemetery hill along the Emmittsburg road. On account of the difficulty of finding a route by which the movement could be made without being observed, McLaws did not get into position opposite the enemy's left until about 4 o'clock Hood's division was moved further to our rig
Virginians (search for this): article 1
ged and precipitous. Gen. Early, upon hearing Gen. Johnson's infantry engaged, sent forward Hayes's Louisiana and Hoke's North Carolina brigade, (under Col. Avery.) These troops advancing as a storming party, quickly passed over a ridge and down a hill in a valley below they met two lines of the Federals posted behind stone walls. These they charged. At the charge the Federals broke and fled up the hill, closely pursued by our men. (The enemy, after repulsing Gen. Jones's brigade of Virginians, pushed a column down the valley, between them and Gen. Early, with the view of turning Jones's right Bank, but hearing Early's guns they hastily returned.) It was now dark. But Hayes and Avery, still pursuing, pushed the enemy up the hill and stormed the Cemetery heights. Says a most intelligent spectator, who witnessed this charge, "I have never seen or heard anything more intensely exciting and terrible than this contest now became. From the point where I stood, just outside of the t
A. P. Hill (search for this): article 1
e parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburgeen driven back by the corps of Lieuts Gen Ewell and Hill on the first day, had taken up a strong position extthem met some brigades of Anderson's division, of A. P. Hill's corps, driving back one of them and king anothe left, and Longstreet on the extreme right, with A. P. Hill in the centre. We have hurriedly and imperfectly guns taking the enemy's in reverse, whilst those on Hill's front and on the right were engaged with them in fpported by the troops on his right, (which were from Hill's corps,) was compelled to fail back, bringing with condition of affairs on our extreme right and left. Hill during this day occupied the centre, and only a part, with Perry and Wilcox, were formed on the right of Hill's corps, and the left of Longstreet's being joined omanding. Perhaps when the official report of Lieut.-General Hill shall be given to the public, the whole matte
Pennsylvania campaign--second day at Gettysburg. [from our own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, March 18th, 1864. In two previous letters I have adverted to the parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. To-day I propose to speak of the second day's fight. Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps crossed the Potomac on the 25th. Hood and McLaws, of the same corps, on the 26th, and these three divisions reac this day occupied the centre, and only a part of his corps was actively engaged. Late in the afternoon of this day, whilst Lieut. General Longstreet's corps and a portion of Major Gen. Anderson's division were assaulting the enemy's left, Major Gen. Pender having ridden to the extreme right of his command to put them in the fight, should the opportunity offer, received a severe wound in the leg from the fragment of a shell. The wound, at first pronounced not dangerous, subsequently proved fa
G. T. Anderson (search for this): article 1
they held with great pertinacity. The enemy were, however, driven from point to point until nearly night, when a very strong force of them met some brigades of Anderson's division, of A. P. Hill's corps, driving back one of them and king another. Backs dale's brigade, of McLaws's division, was also driven back at the same time two pieces of artillery, several hundred prisoners, and two stands of colors, with heavy loss, however. Major General Hood was severely wounded, as was Brig. Gen. G. T. Anderson, of Hood's division. Brig. Gen. Barksdale, of McLaws's di of the same division, was mortally wounded, but has since died, and fully one half of the fiethe centre, and only a part of his corps was actively engaged. Late in the afternoon of this day, whilst Lieut. General Longstreet's corps and a portion of Major Gen. Anderson's division were assaulting the enemy's left, Major Gen. Pender having ridden to the extreme right of his command to put them in the fight, should the opport
rps crossed the Potomac on the 25th. Hood and McLaws, of the same corps, on the 26th, and these thremained for two days. From this point Hood and McLaws moved to Greenwood. Pickett was left at Chambs which came into the road from Shippensburg. McLaws's division, notwithstanding this delay, reachemovement could be made without being observed, McLaws did not get into position opposite the enemy'ss left. Cabell's battalion of artillery, with McLaws's division and Henry's battalion of artillery,ward, pressing the enemy upon his left, whilst McLaws attacked the enemy in front. The enemy was som and king another. Backs dale's brigade, of McLaws's division, was also driven back at the same tet was with and superintended the movements of McLaws's division, leading the charge of Wofford's br of Hood's division. Brig. Gen. Barksdale, of McLaws's di of the same division, was mortally woundnd to the left. After Barksdale's brigade, of McLaws's division, had been engaged for some time, Wi[1 more...]
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 1
rps and a portion of Major Gen. Anderson's division were assaulting the enemy's left, Major Gen. Pender having ridden to the extreme right of his command to put them in the fight, should the opportunity offer, received a severe wound in the leg from the fragment of a shell. The wound, at first pronounced not dangerous, subsequently proved fatal. Words from the writer in eulogy of this brave and accomplished officer are unnecessary. Speaking of him in his preliminary report of Gettysburg, Gen. Lee says: "This lamented officer has borne a distinguished part in every engagement of this army and while leading his command with conspicuous gallantry and ability. The confidence and admiration inspired by his courage and capacity as an officer were only equalled by the esteem and respect entertained by all with whom he was associated for the noble qualities of his modest and unassuming character." Early in the morning of the 2d July, Wilcox's brigade began to take position, but findi
Pennsylvania campaign--second day at Gettysburg. [from our own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, March 18th, 1864. In two previous letters I have adverted to the parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. To-day I propose to speak of the second day's fight. Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps crossed the Potomac on the 25th. Hood and McLaws, of the same corps, on the 26th, and these three divisions reached Chambersburg on the 27th of June. Here the whole corps remained for two days. From this point Hood and McLaws moved to Greenwood. Pickett was left at Chambersburg to guard and bring up the rear. On the 1st of July the corps received orders to move to Gettysburg. It was detained, however, several hours by Johnson's division and the train of wagons which came into the road from Shippensburg. McLaws's division, notwithstanding this delay, reached Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg, soo
June 27th (search for this): article 1
day at Gettysburg. [from our own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, March 18th, 1864. In two previous letters I have adverted to the parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. To-day I propose to speak of the second day's fight. Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps crossed the Potomac on the 25th. Hood and McLaws, of the same corps, on the 26th, and these three divisions reached Chambersburg on the 27th of June. Here the whole corps remained for two days. From this point Hood and McLaws moved to Greenwood. Pickett was left at Chambersburg to guard and bring up the rear. On the 1st of July the corps received orders to move to Gettysburg. It was detained, however, several hours by Johnson's division and the train of wagons which came into the road from Shippensburg. McLaws's division, notwithstanding this delay, reached Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg, soon after dark on the evening of
ce, the ground being now to him, and very rugged and precipitous. Gen. Early, upon hearing Gen. Johnson's infantry engaged, sent forward Hayes's Louisiana and Hoke's North Carolina brigade, (under Col. Avery.) These troops advancing as a storming party, quickly passed over a ridge and down a hill in a valley below they met twhree or four directions besides that which they were attacking. Fortunately, in the darkness they overshot, and our men did not suffer very severely. Hayes's and Hoke's brigades pressed on and captured two or three lines of breast works and three or four of their batteries of artillery. For a few moments every gun of the enemy l's corps,) was compelled to fail back, bringing with him four stands of captured colors and some seventy five prisoners." Col. Avery, 6th N. C. troops, commanding Hoke's brigade, was killed in this attack. It is believed that if this attack had been supported by a simultaneous one on our right, different results would have f
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