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Milan, Sullivan County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
e left thirteen hundred francs with Greco. He next sent him one thousand francs from London, and again two thousand francs in bank notes. At the same time he collected arms. Greco received ten bombs, revolvers and poignards, through various Mazzinian agents, and particularly through a person named Mostet, of Genoa. Finally, Greco selected, with the approbation of Mazzini, the comrades who were to accompany him to France. He had already secured the assistance of Imperatori. Being at Milan in July, 1863, where he was known as possessing the confidence of Mazzini, he had a visit from Natale Imperatori, who had been one of Garibaldi's companions in the expedition of Marsala in 1859, and for that reason was in the receipt of the pension of "the Thousand." Imperatori announced himself as the originator of the plan to make an attempt on the life of the Emperor of the French. Greco and he met at Lugano in the month of September. Imperatori persisting in his determination, Greco r
Turin (Italy) (search for this): article 5
. If there is a great probability of doing the thing, you are to write an insignificant letter, and conclude, "I will write to you in a week, in three or four days." If there be absolute want of an intimate, "be pleased to tell me the price of a Broadwood piano in London." This note was one of the documents found in possession of Greco. It is manifestly from the hand of Mazzini, and an expert has abundantly demonstrated it. Together with Greco. Greco then set out for France, by way of Turin and Mont Cenis, and reached Paris early in May. Under the name of Floretti, and sometimes under his own name, he lodged successively at the Hotel Saint Marie, Rue de Rivoli and at No. 128 Rue St. Honore. He found a pretext, as had been agreed upon, to present himself at the house of Prince Murat, one of whose secretaries he frequently saw; and he succeeded in this way in making the police agents, who had at first watched his movements, believe that their surveillance was superfluous.
Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 5
but that substance, which had left a trace on the blades, had evaporated, and experts could not discover its nature. At the time the prisoners were arrested the execution of the plot was evidently near at hand. Trabuco was about to leave. He had announced at his hotel that he was going to London; he asked for a hammer and some nails to close a box, and he wrote an address for it, which was found in his room. Scagtioni had written to his family to request they would send him money to Geneva. Greco wrote to London to say that all was going on well, and asked for money, which, in fact, arrived on the 6th, after his arrest, under the form of a draft for 500£, supplied by a house known to have relations with Mazzini. In fine, the bombs, which it was agreed should not be charged until the last moment, were filled with gunpowder the evening before the arrest of the prisoners.--This was done by Trabuco and Greco, with the help of Scagtioni, and in the presence of Imperatori.
Genoa (Italy) (search for this): article 5
veral other notes signed by Mazzini with his usual abbreviation, together with four of his photographs, two of which were signed by him. Eight days before Mazzini quitted Lugano he left thirteen hundred francs with Greco. He next sent him one thousand francs from London, and again two thousand francs in bank notes. At the same time he collected arms. Greco received ten bombs, revolvers and poignards, through various Mazzinian agents, and particularly through a person named Mostet, of Genoa. Finally, Greco selected, with the approbation of Mazzini, the comrades who were to accompany him to France. He had already secured the assistance of Imperatori. Being at Milan in July, 1863, where he was known as possessing the confidence of Mazzini, he had a visit from Natale Imperatori, who had been one of Garibaldi's companions in the expedition of Marsala in 1859, and for that reason was in the receipt of the pension of "the Thousand." Imperatori announced himself as the origina
Pisa (Italy) (search for this): article 5
last examination: "I accept the answers given by my friends." Never was crime more skillfully prepared — never were conspirators better chosen, and supplied with arms more terrible and more sure. Never was attempt against society as large so near its accomplishment, when the vigilance of the authorities penetrated their designs, foiled their plots, and delivered over to justice the guilty. Wherefore the persons named--1. Pascal Greco, aged 28 years, professor of music, born at Pisa, Italy, residing in Paris, No. 178 Rue St. Honore; 2. Raphael Trabuco, aged 40, born at Citta di Averse, Italy, residing in Paris, No. 176 Rue St. Honore; 3. Natalo Agestino Imperatori, aged 33, bookbinder, born at Lugano, Switzerland, same residence; 4. Angelo Scagtioni, aged 22, student, born at St Joseph, Italy, same residence; 5. Giuseppe Mazzini, born in Italy, absent — are accused of having, in 1863 and 1864, with the design concerted and decided between them, formed a plot having for
France (France) (search for this): article 5
ound in possession of Greco. It is manifestly from the hand of Mazzini, and an expert has abundantly demonstrated it. Together with Greco. Greco then set out for France, by way of Turin and Mont Cenis, and reached Paris early in May. Under the name of Floretti, and sometimes under his own name, he lodged successively at the Hotets, and particularly through a person named Mostet, of Genoa. Finally, Greco selected, with the approbation of Mazzini, the comrades who were to accompany him to France. He had already secured the assistance of Imperatori. Being at Milan in July, 1863, where he was known as possessing the confidence of Mazzini, he had a vi his relations with Greco. He admitted that he introduced Scagtioni. That he was aware of the object of the journey; that be assisted in bringing the bombs into France, and that he knew Greco had assumed the name of Floretti. The other prisoners explained that no arms were found in his room because the furniture could not be fi
Lugano (Switzerland) (search for this): article 5
t society as large so near its accomplishment, when the vigilance of the authorities penetrated their designs, foiled their plots, and delivered over to justice the guilty. Wherefore the persons named--1. Pascal Greco, aged 28 years, professor of music, born at Pisa, Italy, residing in Paris, No. 178 Rue St. Honore; 2. Raphael Trabuco, aged 40, born at Citta di Averse, Italy, residing in Paris, No. 176 Rue St. Honore; 3. Natalo Agestino Imperatori, aged 33, bookbinder, born at Lugano, Switzerland, same residence; 4. Angelo Scagtioni, aged 22, student, born at St Joseph, Italy, same residence; 5. Giuseppe Mazzini, born in Italy, absent — are accused of having, in 1863 and 1864, with the design concerted and decided between them, formed a plot having for its object to attempt the life of the Emperor, the said plot having been followed by an act committed or commenced towards its execution, the said crime being against the 86th and 89 articles of the first section of the Penal
early in May. Under the name of Floretti, and sometimes under his own name, he lodged successively at the Hotel Saint Marie, Rue de Rivoli and at No. 128 Rue St. Honore. He found a pretext, as had been agreed upon, to present himself at the house of Prince Murat, one of whose secretaries he frequently saw; and he succeeded in thjustice the guilty. Wherefore the persons named--1. Pascal Greco, aged 28 years, professor of music, born at Pisa, Italy, residing in Paris, No. 178 Rue St. Honore; 2. Raphael Trabuco, aged 40, born at Citta di Averse, Italy, residing in Paris, No. 176 Rue St. Honore; 3. Natalo Agestino Imperatori, aged 33, bookbinder, borHonore; 3. Natalo Agestino Imperatori, aged 33, bookbinder, born at Lugano, Switzerland, same residence; 4. Angelo Scagtioni, aged 22, student, born at St Joseph, Italy, same residence; 5. Giuseppe Mazzini, born in Italy, absent — are accused of having, in 1863 and 1864, with the design concerted and decided between them, formed a plot having for its object to attempt the life of the Empero
ad left a trace on the blades, had evaporated, and experts could not discover its nature. At the time the prisoners were arrested the execution of the plot was evidently near at hand. Trabuco was about to leave. He had announced at his hotel that he was going to London; he asked for a hammer and some nails to close a box, and he wrote an address for it, which was found in his room. Scagtioni had written to his family to request they would send him money to Geneva. Greco wrote to London to say that all was going on well, and asked for money, which, in fact, arrived on the 6th, after his arrest, under the form of a draft for 500£, supplied by a house known to have relations with Mazzini. In fine, the bombs, which it was agreed should not be charged until the last moment, were filled with gunpowder the evening before the arrest of the prisoners.--This was done by Trabuco and Greco, with the help of Scagtioni, and in the presence of Imperatori. Trabuco, for a purpose whi
The Italian conspiracy against Napoleon — official Accusation of Mazzini as the "Head of the Plot." The acts d'accusation, or bill of indictment, read at the trial of the Italian conspirators — just convicted in Paris — against the life of the Emperor Napoleon, contains the following charges against Mazzini: At the head of this plot is Mazzini. This ardent conspirator, already condemned by default on the 3d of September, 1857, by the Assize Court of the Seine, was found guilty of having formed, with certain persons named Tibaldi, Bartoletti, and others, a plot for the assassination of the Emperor, and has not ceased to attack, in the person of Napoleon III, the principle of order and authority of which the revolution is the implacable enemy. During the trial of 1857 papers were seized which revealed these plots, and it is requisite to refer to them in order to show the criminal persistence of the chief of the party of action in Italy. On the 10th of June, 1857, Mazzin<
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