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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 4, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Charles Y. Morriss (search for this): article 1
ghly estimated. The present supply of sugar and molasses in the Confederacy is not heavy, and is being daily reduced. A few months more will, perhaps, suffice to consume it. As a substitute sorghum must supply the deficiency, and if every farmer will but take the pains to cultivate a few acres of the cane he will not only contribute to the production of a crop beneficial to the public, but one which will of necessity prove incentive to himself. In this connection we may state that Mr. Charles Y. Morriss, of this city, contemplates the erection of a mill for grinding cane and manufacturing molasses at some necessible point on the line of the canal between this city and Lynchburg. His intention is either to buy the cane and manufacture molasses for market, or to grind it upon shares for those who have not the means at home of manufacturing the molasses themselves. This should be an incentive to the farmers in that section of the State to engage in the cultivation of the sorghum, as
and just at that moment a force of two hundred rebels rode between the General and his lines. Had they known of his presence they could have captured him with case. The Democratic Convention of Ohio to name delegates to Chicago was held on Wednesday. --There seems to have been a struggle between the Vallandighamers and the other faction, the vote being as close as 211 to 213. George E. Fugh and W. Bartly were chosen Senatorial delegates, and a State ticket was got up to be defeated in October. The English blockade running steamer Nawman, while attempting to run the blockade of the Suwance river, Five, was run ashore, and to prevent her falling into Federal hands, was destroyed by the crew. The Chicago Journal, says "that quite a number of our Western troops are to be immediately transferred to the Eastern theatre of war. The Northwestern soldiers will, it is likely, help to take Richmond." At Memphis, a few days ago, a block of twenty buildings used for storing c
T. L. Burnett (search for this): article 1
circulated among the inhabitants. A gentleman living in Monticello assures us that most of the Kentucky delegation representing the State in the rebel Congress at Richmond have returned and are inciting the people to revolt. He said that before he left Monticello he was told by a secessionist that if he would come to a certain place which he pointed out to him, he would there see G. W. Triplet, of Louisville, who had just come from Richmond, in company of E. M. Bruce, G. W. Ewing, T. L. Burnett, and other rebel Kentuckian. He was also told that these gentlemen had come for the purpose of preparing the people for the approaching arrival of Breckinridge and Buckner. The Louisville Journal of the 18th, in speaking of the expected rebel raid into Kentucky, says that not a few Kentucky rebels in the South have written within a short time to their rebel relations, friends, and sympathizers at home, to sell or in some way make secure their horses, mules, cattle, sheep, hogs, gra
E. M. Bruce (search for this): article 1
ors of their advance being circulated among the inhabitants. A gentleman living in Monticello assures us that most of the Kentucky delegation representing the State in the rebel Congress at Richmond have returned and are inciting the people to revolt. He said that before he left Monticello he was told by a secessionist that if he would come to a certain place which he pointed out to him, he would there see G. W. Triplet, of Louisville, who had just come from Richmond, in company of E. M. Bruce, G. W. Ewing, T. L. Burnett, and other rebel Kentuckian. He was also told that these gentlemen had come for the purpose of preparing the people for the approaching arrival of Breckinridge and Buckner. The Louisville Journal of the 18th, in speaking of the expected rebel raid into Kentucky, says that not a few Kentucky rebels in the South have written within a short time to their rebel relations, friends, and sympathizers at home, to sell or in some way make secure their horses, mule
Rosecrans (search for this): article 1
will no doubt prove an advantageous one for permanent investment, more so perhaps in the course of time, than the five-twenty bonds, as it has longer to run, which to many is a great inducement. Miscellaneous. The special order of General Rosecrans, from the Department of Missouri, suppressing the circulation of the New York Metropolitan Record in his military command, is published. The articles in the condemned paper are designated by Gen. Rosecrans as "of an incendiary, disloyal, aGen. Rosecrans as "of an incendiary, disloyal, and traitorous character" The General complains that, although it is called a Catholic newspaper, it has no "ecclesiastical sanction, " and denounces its articles as "a libel on Catholics," with other very strong language. Therefore the Provost Marshal is ordered to seize the paper and punish the venders thereof. Indiana, we believe, is the only State that has been always in advance of calls for troops. It is now stated that on the first day of February last that State had furnished her qu
McClellan (search for this): article 1
Incendiaries thrive in Vicksburg. There have been many fires recently; several Government stores have been burned, and the railroad depot and adjoining buildings set on fire. Cents hereafter coined will be composed of ninety-five per centum of copper and five per centum of tin or zinc. Elisha R. Potter is the nominee of the Democratic State Convention for Governor of Connecticut at the coming election. Major General Lew Wallace, of Indiana, has entered upon duty as commander of the Middle Department, headquarters at Baltimore. The Democratic State Convention of Pennsylvania have declared in favor of McClellan for the Presidency. Miss. Laura Keene was playing at Norfolk, Va., last week, in the American Cousin. An order has been issued prohibiting the shipment of American coal to Canada. The quota of Pennsylvania under the last call for troops is 26,302. The Sons of Connecticut in Washington have organized for the State and national campaigns.
Through the politeness of the officers of the Exchange Bureau we have received Northern papers of Thursday last, 31st ult. We give a summary of the news they contain: Rebellion in Missouri and Illinois--troops Attacked — Insurgents entrenched. The papers contain the following account of a disturbance which has occurred in Missouri and Illinois. All the places mentioned are in the Northern portions of those States, and but a few miles distant from each other: St. Louis, Tuesday, March 29, 1864. --A special dispatch to the Democrat, from Charleston, Coles co says the Copperheads came into that town to attend Court yesterday, with guns concealed in their wagons and armed with pistols. Some soldiers in the Court-House yard were drawn into an affray, and a general fight occurred. The County Sheriff sprang from the Judge's stand and commenced firing a pistol at Union men Major York, surgeon of the 54th, was one of the first victims. The Union men, being outnumber
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 1
cy which has prevailed heretofore. The few furloughed soldiers whom he permitted to have seats in the special car the other day, in order that they might overtake the balance of their command, will never forget the courtesy, and will never cease talking of it. He has taken the hearts of the soldiers by storm, as he did Vicksburg, and they swear he shall say that the Army of the Potomac is the best fighting army in the world after he has once led it to battle. They also think he will find in Lee a more formidable antagonist than he has ever met at the Southwest. An expected rebel invasion of Kentucky. There is a wide spread apprehension in the West that the Confederates are about invading Kentucky again. A telegram from Cincinnati says: The idea that Gen. Breckinridge is advancing upon the Kentucky line, with the intention of raising the country in insurrection, adds a great deal to the excitement of the people. A few days ago a rumor was spread that Gen. Longstreet
st going to England as a measure of security. We may thank Secretary Welles for the sending of our products to England. The subscriptions to the two hundred million loan to-day at the Sub-Treasury amounted to $94,300, and at the First National Bank to $151,000.--The subscriptions in Philadelphia have not yet reached a million of dollars in the aggregate. It is very evident that this loan is dragging heavily, and unless capitalists evince a more lively and generous spirit towards it Mr. Chase will be forced to come out with some more attractive plan to keep it at par. The loan will no doubt prove an advantageous one for permanent investment, more so perhaps in the course of time, than the five-twenty bonds, as it has longer to run, which to many is a great inducement. Miscellaneous. The special order of General Rosecrans, from the Department of Missouri, suppressing the circulation of the New York Metropolitan Record in his military command, is published. The articles
oldiers in the Court-House yard were drawn into an affray, and a general fight occurred. The County Sheriff sprang from the Judge's stand and commenced firing a pistol at Union men Major York, surgeon of the 54th, was one of the first victims. The Union men, being outnumbered at the Court House, ran to the houses and stores for arms. They were fired upon from the windows. Ten or twelve were wounded. Col. Mitchell, of the 54th regiment, was badly wounded; Oliver Sales was killed; James Goodrich Wm. Hart, T. C. Jeffreys, and several soldiers belonging to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guar
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