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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Aberdeen (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
nounce the death of Lord Ashburton.--He was the son of the Lord Ashburton who made with Mr. webster the Northwestern Boundary Treaty. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1799, his mother being an American lady, the daughter of william Bingham, a prominent merchant of that day in that city. At an early age, with his parents, he returned to England, where, it is said, he took an active though not a prominent part in politics. The same papers also announce the death of the Earl of Aberdeen. He held several important offices of a diplomatic character under the British Ministry, and was in 1823 appointed Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and afterwards, in 1841, he became Prime Minister. As a diplomatist he was shrewd and successful, but not so absolutely great as to leave a name as such, or be remembered as other than as a useful worker and faithful servant of his Government. In literature he is only known as the author of a work on Grecian architecture, and as a contribute to
t of that day in that city. At an early age, with his parents, he returned to England, where, it is said, he took an active though not a prominent part in politics. The same papers also announce the death of the Earl of Aberdeen. He held several important offices of a diplomatic character under the British Ministry, and was in 1823 appointed Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and afterwards, in 1841, he became Prime Minister. As a diplomatist he was shrewd and successful, but not so absolutely great as to leave a name as such, or be remembered as other than as a useful worker and faithful servant of his Government. In literature he is only known as the author of a work on Grecian architecture, and as a contribute to the Edinburgh--a fact which would probably have been quite forgotten are this but for Byron's castigation. He is, however, the most eminent man who has died in England since the death of Prince Albert, and his decease will, therefore, attract much attention abroad.
Death of English Noblemen. --The late English papers announce the death of Lord Ashburton.--He was the son of the Lord Ashburton who made with Mr. webster the Northwestern Boundary Treaty. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1799, his mother being an American lady, the daughter of william Bingham, a prominent merchant of that day in that city. At an early age, with his parents, he returned to England, where, it is said, he took an active though not a prominent part in politics. The same papers also announce the death of the Earl of Aberdeen. He held several important offices of a diplomatic character under the British Ministry, and was in 1823 appointed Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and afterwards, in 1841, he became Prime Minister. As a diplomatist he was shrewd and successful, but not so absolutely great as to leave a name as such, or be remembered as other than as a useful worker and faithful servant of his Government. In literature he is only known as the au
Death of English Noblemen. --The late English papers announce the death of Lord Ashburton.--He was the son of the Lord Ashburton who made with Mr. webster the Northwestern Boundary Treaty. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1799, his mother being an American lady, the daughter of william Bingham, a prominent merchant of that day in that city. At an early age, with his parents, he returned to England, where, it is said, he took an active though not a prominent part in politics. The same papers also announce the death of the Earl of Aberdeen. He held several important offices of a diplomatic character under the British Ministry, and was in 1823 appointed Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and afterwards, in 1841, he became Prime Minister. As a diplomatist he was shrewd and successful, but not so absolutely great as to leave a name as such, or be remembered as other than as a useful worker and faithful servant of his Government. In literature he is only known as the aut
hwestern Boundary Treaty. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1799, his mother being an American lady, the daughter of william Bingham, a prominent merchant of that day in that city. At an early age, with his parents, he returned to England, where, it is said, he took an active though not a prominent part in politics. The same papers also announce the death of the Earl of Aberdeen. He held several important offices of a diplomatic character under the British Ministry, and was in 1823 appointed Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and afterwards, in 1841, he became Prime Minister. As a diplomatist he was shrewd and successful, but not so absolutely great as to leave a name as such, or be remembered as other than as a useful worker and faithful servant of his Government. In literature he is only known as the author of a work on Grecian architecture, and as a contribute to the Edinburgh--a fact which would probably have been quite forgotten are this but for Byron's castigation.
in 1799, his mother being an American lady, the daughter of william Bingham, a prominent merchant of that day in that city. At an early age, with his parents, he returned to England, where, it is said, he took an active though not a prominent part in politics. The same papers also announce the death of the Earl of Aberdeen. He held several important offices of a diplomatic character under the British Ministry, and was in 1823 appointed Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and afterwards, in 1841, he became Prime Minister. As a diplomatist he was shrewd and successful, but not so absolutely great as to leave a name as such, or be remembered as other than as a useful worker and faithful servant of his Government. In literature he is only known as the author of a work on Grecian architecture, and as a contribute to the Edinburgh--a fact which would probably have been quite forgotten are this but for Byron's castigation. He is, however, the most eminent man who has died in England sin