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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 21, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 13
untsville, Ala., by the name of T. Lampkins, for whom at least a dozen Unionists should be at once incarcerated. A gentleman who was a prisoner companion of Mr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audience and expressed his decided approval of the speaker's propositions, adding that he was led to the conclusion after some enforced intimacy with the people of the United States, that amalgamation with the negro would improve the Yankee race. For this expression, Lampkins was arrested and thrust into a convict's cell, from which he is occasionally taken and marched to the office of the Provost Marshal in Nashville, where he is regularly interrogated as to his opinions upon the subject of amalgamation, and invariably replies that he still thinks the process would result to the benefit of the Yankee, but to the deterioration of the African race.
Bristol (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 13
Miscegenation. --The Bristol (Tenn.) Gazette says: There is now confined by the Federals, in the penitentiary at Nashville, a gentleman from Huntsville, Ala., by the name of T. Lampkins, for whom at least a dozen Unionists should be at once incarcerated. A gentleman who was a prisoner companion of Mr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audience and expressed his decided approval of the speaker's propositions, adding that he was led to the conclusion after some enforced intimacy with the people of the United States, that amalgamation with the negro would improve the Yankee race. For this expression, Lampkins was arrested and thrust into a convict's cell, from which he is occasionally taken and marched to the office of the Provost Marshal in Nashville, where he is regularly interrogated as to his opinions upon the subject of amalgam
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 13
Miscegenation. --The Bristol (Tenn.) Gazette says: There is now confined by the Federals, in the penitentiary at Nashville, a gentleman from Huntsville, Ala., by the name of T. Lampkins, for whom at least a dozen Unionists should be at once incarcerated. A gentleman who was a prisoner companion of Mr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audienHuntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audience and expressed his decided approval of the speaker's propositions, adding that he was led to the conclusion after some enforced intimacy with the people of the United States, that amalgamation with the negro would improve the Yankee race. For this expression, Lampkins was arrested and thrust into a convict's cell, from which he is occasionally taken and marched to the office of the Provost Marshal in Nashville, where he is regularly interrogated as to his opinions upon the subject of amalgama
Miscegenation. --The Bristol (Tenn.) Gazette says: There is now confined by the Federals, in the penitentiary at Nashville, a gentleman from Huntsville, Ala., by the name of T. Lampkins, for whom at least a dozen Unionists should be at once incarcerated. A gentleman who was a prisoner companion of Mr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audience and expressed his decided approval of the speaker's propositions, adding that he was led to the conclusion after some enforced intimacy with the people of the United States, that amalgamation with the negro would improve the Yankee race. For this expression, Lampkins was arrested and thrust into a convict's cell, from which he is occasionally taken and marched to the office of the Provost Marshal in Nashville, where he is regularly interrogated as to his opinions upon the subject of amalgam
T. Lampkins (search for this): article 13
Miscegenation. --The Bristol (Tenn.) Gazette says: There is now confined by the Federals, in the penitentiary at Nashville, a gentleman from Huntsville, Ala., by the name of T. Lampkins, for whom at least a dozen Unionists should be at once incarcerated. A gentleman who was a prisoner companion of Mr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audieMr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audience and expressed his decided approval of the speaker's propositions, adding that he was led to the conclusion after some enforced intimacy with the people of the United States, that amalgamation with the negro would improve the Yankee race. For this expression, Lampkins was arrested and thrust into a convict's cell, from which he is occasionally taken and marched to the office of the Provost Marshal in Nashville, where he is regularly interrogated as to his opinions upon the subject of amalgam
Miscegenation. --The Bristol (Tenn.) Gazette says: There is now confined by the Federals, in the penitentiary at Nashville, a gentleman from Huntsville, Ala., by the name of T. Lampkins, for whom at least a dozen Unionists should be at once incarcerated. A gentleman who was a prisoner companion of Mr. Lampkins informs us that the sole charge against Mr. Hampkins is that, whilst a Yankee speaker was holding forth at Huntsville in favor of practical amalgamation, he rose in the audience and expressed his decided approval of the speaker's propositions, adding that he was led to the conclusion after some enforced intimacy with the people of the United States, that amalgamation with the negro would improve the Yankee race. For this expression, Lampkins was arrested and thrust into a convict's cell, from which he is occasionally taken and marched to the office of the Provost Marshal in Nashville, where he is regularly interrogated as to his opinions upon the subject of amalgama