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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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The Climax. --The masterpiece of the Seward Russell correspondence about the rams is the following brief dispatch from Mr. Layard to Mr. Stuart, Her Majesty's Charge d'affaires at Washington, written the very day that Mr. Adams's threatening dispatch of same date was received, and three days before Earl Russell informed him in three lines that the threat had succeeded. We give it in full: Foreign Office, Feb. 5. We have given orders to-day to the Commissioners of Customs at Liverpool to prevent the two iron clads leaving the Mersey. These orders had scarcely been sent when we received the note from Mr. Adams, of which I send you a copy. Mr. Adams is not yet aware that orders have been given to stop the vessels. You may inform Mr Seward confidentially of the fact.
The Climax. --The masterpiece of the Seward Russell correspondence about the rams is the following brief dispatch from Mr. Layard to Mr. Stuart, Her Majesty's Charge d'affaires at Washington, written the very day that Mr. Adams's threatening dispatch of same date was received, and three days before Earl Russell informed him in three lines that the threat had succeeded. We give it in full: Foreign Office, Feb. 5. We have given orders to-day to the Commissioners of Customs at Liverpool to prevent the two iron clads leaving the Mersey. These orders had scarcely been sent when we received the note from Mr. Adams, of which I send you a copy. Mr. Adams is not yet aware that orders have been given to stop the vessels. You may inform Mr Seward confidentially of the fact.
Wednesday Wirt Adams (search for this): article 6
espondence about the rams is the following brief dispatch from Mr. Layard to Mr. Stuart, Her Majesty's Charge d'affaires at Washington, written the very day that Mr. Adams's threatening dispatch of same date was received, and three days before Earl Russell informed him in three lines that the threat had succeeded. We give it in fuo the Commissioners of Customs at Liverpool to prevent the two iron clads leaving the Mersey. These orders had scarcely been sent when we received the note from Mr. Adams, of which I send you a copy. Mr. Adams is not yet aware that orders have been given to stop the vessels. You may inform Mr Seward confidentially of the fact. the Commissioners of Customs at Liverpool to prevent the two iron clads leaving the Mersey. These orders had scarcely been sent when we received the note from Mr. Adams, of which I send you a copy. Mr. Adams is not yet aware that orders have been given to stop the vessels. You may inform Mr Seward confidentially of the fact.
The Climax. --The masterpiece of the Seward Russell correspondence about the rams is the following brief dispatch from Mr. Layard to Mr. Stuart, Her Majesty's Charge d'affaires at Washington, written the very day that Mr. Adams's threatening dispatch of same date was received, and three days before Earl Russell informed him in three lines that the threat had succeeded. We give it in full: Foreign Office, Feb. 5. We have given orders to-day to the Commissioners of Customs at Liverpool to prevent the two iron clads leaving the Mersey. These orders had scarcely been sent when we received the note from Mr. Adams, of which I send you a copy. Mr. Adams is not yet aware that orders have been given to stop the vessels. You may inform Mr Seward confidentially of the fact.
February 5th (search for this): article 6
The Climax. --The masterpiece of the Seward Russell correspondence about the rams is the following brief dispatch from Mr. Layard to Mr. Stuart, Her Majesty's Charge d'affaires at Washington, written the very day that Mr. Adams's threatening dispatch of same date was received, and three days before Earl Russell informed him in three lines that the threat had succeeded. We give it in full: Foreign Office, Feb. 5. We have given orders to-day to the Commissioners of Customs at Liverpool to prevent the two iron clads leaving the Mersey. These orders had scarcely been sent when we received the note from Mr. Adams, of which I send you a copy. Mr. Adams is not yet aware that orders have been given to stop the vessels. You may inform Mr Seward confidentially of the fact.