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govern their native land in the way "they want it to be governed. I understand "that all we enjoy in the United States, you "want to enjoy in Ireland." It may be asked whether Wentworth meant any allusion to the South. Ireland has already all he proposes to permit us to enjoy. We need not be surprised, however, at his mode of dispensing justice and equality; he once exercised the right to steal, and he would hardly allow that another had a right to steal from him. But John, like any other Yankee, dared nothing about his inconsistency: he went on blowing his trumpet, to the tune of freedom — Ireland's right to be govern by herself in her own way, and the of the Yankees to govern us in their way! Lieut. Governor Hoffman, who, it seems, is an Irishman, glorified the Yankee land-- speaking of the South as still a part of it, and claiming the heroes and statesmen of the South, as well as the land, as theirs — I.e., his and the Yankees'! Giving a glowing sketch of the pains and s
Five hundred dollars reward. --Ranaway from Mr Joseph P Winston, residing near Libe, in Bedford county, Va, on the night of the 21st inst, two slaves, named Jim and Ellen Jim is nearly black, 22 years of age, of medium height and spare, is smart and brisk in his movements and lite, having been accustomed to waiting on officers in the army and management of horses and is also a good hand on a farm is 24 or 25 years of age, of bright brown color, well formed, but, full head of hair, good C H, Va, where they ware raised, and may be attempting to get back is that direction, or are trying make their escape to the lines of the Yankees is some other direction I will give the above reward of $500 for both, or $250 for either of them confined in any jail in the State, so that I get them or delivered in this city to Le & Bowman, or a Jos P Winston, near Liberty to Bedford counts Va, where the above reward will be paid by Mr Wilston, or if here by me Wm Winston Jones my 4--W&S4w*
Change in the Department command of Richmond. The following orders will explain a change which has taken place in the command in this Department: [Extract] Headq'rs Dep't of Richmond,May 6th, 1864. Special Orders, No. 104.-- III. Brig Gen John H Winder having reported for duty, pursuant to Special Orders, 105, A & I G O, current series, is hereby assigned to the command of the Post of Richmond, and will conduct the Military Police of the City and Department until further orders. By command of Major General Ransom. [Signed,]T O Chestney, A A Gen'l. Headq'rs Department of Richmond, May 6th, 1864. General Orders, no. 29-- I. Major J W Pegram, A A General, is hereby announced on the Staff of the Department of Richmond. II. The Departments of Henrico and Richmond having been consolidate by Special Order 105, A and I C O, current series, all the military business heretofore transacted at the headquarters of the Department, exclusive of the military police
s, named Jim and Ellen Jim is nearly black, 22 years of age, of medium height and spare, is smart and brisk in his movements and lite, having been accustomed to waiting on officers in the army and management of horses and is also a good hand on a farm is 24 or 25 years of age, of bright brown color, well formed, but, full head of hair, good set of teeth, and has been accustomed to washing and ironing and waiting on ladies. These slaves were purchased by me from Mr John Taliaferro, near Orange C H, Va, where they ware raised, and may be attempting to get back is that direction, or are trying make their escape to the lines of the Yankees is some other direction I will give the above reward of $500 for both, or $250 for either of them confined in any jail in the State, so that I get them or delivered in this city to Le & Bowman, or a Jos P Winston, near Liberty to Bedford counts Va, where the above reward will be paid by Mr Wilston, or if here by me Wm Winston Jones my 4--W&S4w*
adq's army Northern Va,May 5, 1864. Hon Secretary of War. The enemy crossed the Rapidan at Ely's and Germanna fords. Two corps of this army moved to oppose him — Ewell by the old turnpike, and Hill by the plankroad. They arrived this morning in close proximity to the enemy's line of march. A strong attack was made upon Ewell, who repulsed it, capturing many prisoners and four pieces of artillery. The enemy subsequently concentrated upon Gen. Hill, who, with Heth's and Wilcox's divisions, successfully resisted repeated and desperate assaults. A large force of cavalry and artillery on our right was driven back by Rosser's brigade. By the blessing of God we maintained our position against every effort until night, when the contest closed. We have to mourn the loss of many brave officers and men. The gallant Brig. Gen. J. M Jones was killed, and Brig. Gen. Stafford, Hear, mortally wounded, while leading his command with conspicuous valor. R. B. Lee
M. Jones, and Col. Warren, of the 19th Va., were killed, and Gen. Stafford mortally wounded. [Second Dispatch.] Orange C. H., May 6. --The following additional particulars of the fight yesterday have reached this place; Gens. Heth and Wilcox were in the fight of yesterday.--They checked and drove back three corps and two divisions of the enemy. Laws's North Carolina brigade last night surprised and captured 300 prisoners. Gen. Pegram was painfully wounded in the knee. From 3 o'clock until night there was very heavy musketry fighting, with but little artillery engaged. Cook's brigade fought well, and loses heavily. Thomas J. McGowan's brigade also suffered considerably. Rosser fought Wilcox's whole division of Yankee cavalry with a single brigade, driving them back at all points. [Third Dispatch.] Orange C. H., May 6. --The attack by the enemy this morning was very violent. They were repulsed in every instance. A strong effort was made to turn our ri
t resolutions of thanks to Gen Forrest and the officers and men under his command, for the victories of Okolona, Paducah, Union City, and Fort Pillow. Mr. Johnson, of Ark, offered a resolution, that all joint resolutions giving the thanks of Congress to officers and soldiers of the army or navy of the Confederate States shall, upon the second reading be referred to some one of the standing committees of the Senate, unless otherwise ordered by a majority of the Senate. Agreed to. Mr Wigfall submitted the following, which were made the special order for 1 o'clock Monday, and ordered to be printed: 1. Resolved, That the Congress of the Confederate States of America has the undoubted right, during invasion or rebellion, and when, the public safety requires it, to suspend the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus; and that while so suspended, it is not competent for any Confederate Judge to discharge from custody any person held under or by virtue of the authority of the
Whittington (search for this): article 8
t having any corn in her house; but afterwards, when several of the missing bags were resurrected, acknowledged that there were others about the promises, but that they had been brought there by soldiers. Taylor was a guard at the depot on the night the corn was stolen, and being found in Bridget's house, in his nightclothes, on the night when the search warrant was executed, he was taken under arrest as a person suspected of having something to do with the robbery — He is a member of Capt. Whittington's artillery, but was originally a Yankee deserter.--Mrs. Ryan was remanded to jail in default of security for her appearance for further examination before the Hustings Court. Taylor was committed for want of security to keep the peace and be of good behavior. A charge was preferred against Dennia O'Kieffe of threatening to assault and beat Mary Preston; but there being no evidence to sustain the allegation, he was dismissed. Sarah, Abbey, Lizzie, and Charlotte, slaves of Mr
John Wentworth (search for this): article 2
n the occasion were full of glorification of Ireland, and of pledges for her independence. It is enough to say that the inauguration address was delivered by John Wentworth, of infamous notoriety, to satisfy all that Ireland has little to hope from this Chicago demonstration. Lt. Governor Hoffman, of Illinois, also figured largely. The speeches were inconsistent and ridiculous enough. Wentworth said: "I understand "that this organization means nothing more "nor less than the right of citizens of Ire "land to govern their native land in the way "they want it to be governed. I understand "that all we enjoy in the United States, you "want to enjoy in Ireland." It may be asked whether Wentworth meant any allusion to the South. Ireland has already all he proposes to permit us to enjoy. We need not be surprised, however, at his mode of dispensing justice and equality; he once exercised the right to steal, and he would hardly allow that another had a right to steal from him. But John
nd the Tunds reach a lower point than they have already come to — and that slow enough — they must go in with miscegenation Slavery bring now virtually dead, and slavery becomes a paradox, and, as they must do something for a living, the agitation of miscegenation is the only course left to them. The blockade squadron, The New York Herald has the following paragraph relative to the farce called by the Yankees a blockade: The blockade runners are doing a thriving business while Mr. Welles is taking a comfortable nap. They are running freely, it appears, to and fro upon the ocean, carrying rebel products to Europe and bringing back rebel supplies from the sympathizers on the other side of the Atlantic. We hear of 12 vessels arriving at Liverpool in two days, leader with cotton from the rebel States. We also learn by our flies from Bermuda that the steamer Minnie has just brought in there 732 tons of cotton and 320 boxes of tobacco from Wilmington, and that quite a fleet of
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