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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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d many hired servants. The number needed by each family will be determined by the undersigned," namely, Kelley. The Government does not mean to feed idle negroes, that is clear! Was there ever a more thorough ban put upon the descendants of Ham? Well may the Yankee call him "contraband." Literally does he fulfill the curse upon the descendants of Ham: that they shall be the servants of servants. What are the ill-fated people of Natchez but Yankee servants, since they are subjected to dHam: that they shall be the servants of servants. What are the ill-fated people of Natchez but Yankee servants, since they are subjected to domiciliary visits and the commands of Yankee officials as to how many servants they shall have and what other privileges they shall enjoy? And the contraband are ordered to become the servants of these people, on pain of being driven out of the city and kept in prison bounds, in what a philanthropic correspondent of the Tribune calls a "Krall"--a place to keep cattle. This, on a small scale, illustrates the ultimate fate of the negro at the hands of the Yankees. All that cannot be made usefu
s, and sent him to the Western forests, covered with sores and cursed with the vices of civilization! The illustrations of the misery the Yankees are bringing upon the hapless children of Africa — those "American citizens of African descent," as the hideous monster at the lead of the Federal Government styles them in mockery — are of daily occurrence. An instance just to hand is afforded in an order issued by A. W. Kelley, Yankee Surgeon and Health Officer at Natchez, approved by Brig. Gen. Tuttle, in command. This order we published in the Dispatch yesterday morning. In this order the negroes are pronounced lazy and profligate, unused to caring for "themselves, thriftless for the present, improvident of the future." He adds: "The most of them loaf idly about the streets and alleys, prowling in secret places, and lounge lazily in crowded hovels, which soon become dens of noisome filth, the hot-beds fit to engender and rapidly disseminate the most loathsome and malignant diseas
A. W. Kelley (search for this): article 1
vernment styles them in mockery — are of daily occurrence. An instance just to hand is afforded in an order issued by A. W. Kelley, Yankee Surgeon and Health Officer at Natchez, approved by Brig. Gen. Tuttle, in command. This order we published in legitimate employment." What amiable and humane administrators of law and police these Northern philanthropists are! Surgeon Kelley tells all and singular, in this notable order, that an attempt to evade the order "will be punished "more severely thtablished in the land of the "saints," it would produce a world of inconvenience and trouble! But of the poor negro, Kelley does not dispose of even here. He adds another article, which provides that "persons drawing rations from the United Stat supposed to need many hired servants. The number needed by each family will be determined by the undersigned," namely, Kelley. The Government does not mean to feed idle negroes, that is clear! Was there ever a more thorough ban put upon the
Yankee Surgeon (search for this): article 1
e poor Indian!" after they had robbed him of his rich domains, and sent him to the Western forests, covered with sores and cursed with the vices of civilization! The illustrations of the misery the Yankees are bringing upon the hapless children of Africa — those "American citizens of African descent," as the hideous monster at the lead of the Federal Government styles them in mockery — are of daily occurrence. An instance just to hand is afforded in an order issued by A. W. Kelley, Yankee Surgeon and Health Officer at Natchez, approved by Brig. Gen. Tuttle, in command. This order we published in the Dispatch yesterday morning. In this order the negroes are pronounced lazy and profligate, unused to caring for "themselves, thriftless for the present, improvident of the future." He adds: "The most of them loaf idly about the streets and alleys, prowling in secret places, and lounge lazily in crowded hovels, which soon become dens of noisome filth, the hot-beds fit to engender and
Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 1
nts they shall have and what other privileges they shall enjoy? And the contraband are ordered to become the servants of these people, on pain of being driven out of the city and kept in prison bounds, in what a philanthropic correspondent of the Tribune calls a "Krall"--a place to keep cattle. This, on a small scale, illustrates the ultimate fate of the negro at the hands of the Yankees. All that cannot be made useful, will be driven forth to some place where the Yankees will not be troubled with them; and that place must not be any place that is fertile — that has sweet waters and fine groves — for such place the Yankees will never give up to the negro. It must be some Siberia, undesirable to the Saints! The correspondent of the Tribunes, no doubt very truly, says that, subjected to these crucifies, many negroes "who had kind masters resolved to return to slavery." "Whole families had lived together with their masters; but now they must be separated."-- "Lo, the poor negro
ur force, now under the command of Col. McCauseland, has fallen back to Christiansburg, in Montgomery county, eighty miles west of Lynchburg. Arrival of prisoners at Lynchburg. Forty-four officers and 891 privates, captured by Gen. Lee at Parker's Store, on Thursday last, arrived in Lynchburg Saturday afternoon. Among the officers are one Colonel, two Majors, fourteen Captains, and twenty-seven Lieutenants, representing 20 regiments — from Maine, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, New York, Michigan, and Indiana. Two or three of them belong to the regular army. Many of these officers were captured in the fights around Richmond in 1862, and were recognized by Lieut. Shihn, Assistant Provost Marshal in that city, who; once had charge of them on Belle Isle. The officers and privates all belonged to the fifth corps commanded by Hancock. They are described as a decidedly genteel set of Yankees, and conducted themselves while passing through the streets with more propriety than usual.
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): article 1
: Headqs, Ashland, May 11, 6.30 A M. To Gen. Bragg: General — The enemy reached this point just before us, but were promptly whipped out after a sharp fight by Col. Munford, (Fitz Lee's advance,) killing and capturing quite a number. Gen. Gordon is in the immediate rear of the enemy. I intersect the road the enemy is marching on, at Yellow Tavern, the head of the turnpike, six miles from Richmond. My men and horses are tired, hungry, and jaded, but all right. J. E. B. Stuart. About 9 o'clock Gen Stuart arrived in the enemy's rear on the Brook road, and Gen. Gordon in their rear on the Mountain road. The two roads join in the Brook turnpike at the Yellow Tavern, about six miles from Richmond, and the intention of the enemy was to come down the turnpike, cross the Brook bridge, go around to the Meadow Bridge road, and thence down the Peninsula. This plan was frustrated by the burning of the Meadow bridge by our troops.--This fact being discovered
D. H. Hill (search for this): article 1
me of the enemy leaping over the breastworks.--They were easily repulsed, except in front of Gen. Doles's brigade, where they drove our men from their position, and from a four-gun battery there posted. The men were soon rallied, and by dark our line was re-established and the battery recovered. A large body of the enemy moved around our left on the evening of the 9th, and took possession of the road about midway between Shady Grove Church and the Court-House. Gen. Early, with a part of Hill's corps, drove them back this evening, taking one gun and a few prisoners. Thanks to a merciful Providence, our casualties have been small. Among the wounded are Brig. Gens. Hayes and H. H. Walker. R. E. Lee. The following private dispatch, from Mayor Slaughter, of Fredericksburg, was received yesterday. It refers to the repulse mentioned in Gen. Lee's telegram: Guiney's, May 11, 1864. I came here to obtain information from Fredericksburg. I hear nothing
J. R. Anderson (search for this): article 1
nce from Gen. Lee was received at the War Department yesterday: Spotsylvania C. H., Via Guiney's, May 11th. The Honorable Secretary of War: Gen. Grant's army is entrenched near this place, on both sides of the Brook road. --Frequent skirmishing occurred yesterday and to-day, each army endeavoring to discover the position of the other. To-day the enemy shelled our lines and made several assaults with infantry against different points, particularly on our left, held by Gen. R. H Anderson. The last which occurred after sunset, was the most obstinate; some of the enemy leaping over the breastworks.--They were easily repulsed, except in front of Gen. Doles's brigade, where they drove our men from their position, and from a four-gun battery there posted. The men were soon rallied, and by dark our line was re-established and the battery recovered. A large body of the enemy moved around our left on the evening of the 9th, and took possession of the road about midway betwee
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 1
a merciful Providence, our casualties have been small. Among the wounded are Brig. Gens. Hayes and H. H. Walker. R. E. Lee. The following private dispatch, from Mayor Slaughter, of Fredericksburg, was received yesterday. It refers to the repulse mentioned in Gen. Lee's telegram: Guiney's, May 11, 1864. I came here to obtain information from Fredericksburg. I hear nothing but the statement that citizens have been arrested as hostages for prisoners we captured thenews is generally favorable. M. Slaughter. Some anxiety was felt in the public mind as to the supplies for Gen. Lee's army, which may be removed by the fact that all the railroad damage done by the raiders has been repaired, and Gen. LeGen. Lee's line of communication is intact. The Southside of the James — the enemy fallen back to Bermuda Hundreds — they Disappear from Drewry's Bluff and Port Walthall. It would seem that the enemy have changed their plan of operations on the sou
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