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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Dunkirk (New York, United States) (search for this): article 2
k upon the coast of France for shelter. In 1755 an English fleet of several ships of the line and some frigates were sent to intercepts a French fleet of twenty-five ships of the line and many smaller vessels, which had sailed from Brest for America. The fleets passed each other in a thick fog. All but two of the French vessels reached Quebec, and nine of them soon afterwards returned to France. In 1759 a British force, under Commander Boy, blockaded a French fleet in the port of Dunkirk. The French commander, seizing a favorable opportunity, not only escaped from his enemy, but attacked the coast of Scotland, and cruised about till the next year, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty one British ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France. A still more remarkable case occurred in 1796, when the French attempted to throw the army of Hoche into Ireland. The most extraordinary efforts were made by the British naval auth
Toulon (France) (search for this): article 2
is fleet forty ships of war and an immense fleet of transports, making in all three hundred sail, and carrying forty thousand troops. Its destination was Malta, and it slipped out of port, followed by Nelson, who tried two courses for Alexandria, and missed the French in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous; the fleets actually crossed each other on a certain night; yet Nelson could see nothing of them himself, and heard nothing of them from merchant vessels. In 1805 another Toulon fleet escaped from Nelson. He sought for it in vain in the Mediterranean; then proceeded to the West Indies; then back to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): article 2
g the short distance to the British coast without meeting any opposition, and was only prevented from landing the troops by a storm, which drove them back upon the coast of France for shelter. In 1755 an English fleet of several ships of the line and some frigates were sent to intercepts a French fleet of twenty-five ships of the line and many smaller vessels, which had sailed from Brest for America. The fleets passed each other in a thick fog. All but two of the French vessels reached Quebec, and nine of them soon afterwards returned to France. In 1759 a British force, under Commander Boy, blockaded a French fleet in the port of Dunkirk. The French commander, seizing a favorable opportunity, not only escaped from his enemy, but attacked the coast of Scotland, and cruised about till the next year, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty one British ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France. A still more remarkable case
West Indies (search for this): article 2
ing forty thousand troops. Its destination was Malta, and it slipped out of port, followed by Nelson, who tried two courses for Alexandria, and missed the French in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous; the fleets actually crossed each other on a certain night; yet Nelson could see nothing of them himself, and heard nothing of them from merchant vessels. In 1805 another Toulon fleet escaped from Nelson. He sought for it in vain in the Mediterranean; then proceeded to the West Indies; then back to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce of its adversary. We have seen how for years a few Confederate vessels have foiled the whole naval power
France (France) (search for this): article 2
t distance to the British coast without meeting any opposition, and was only prevented from landing the troops by a storm, which drove them back upon the coast of France for shelter. In 1755 an English fleet of several ships of the line and some frigates were sent to intercepts a French fleet of twenty-five ships of the line om Brest for America. The fleets passed each other in a thick fog. All but two of the French vessels reached Quebec, and nine of them soon afterwards returned to France. In 1759 a British force, under Commander Boy, blockaded a French fleet in the port of Dunkirk. The French commander, seizing a favorable opportunity, not oabout till the next year, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty one British ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France. A still more remarkable case occurred in 1796, when the French attempted to throw the army of Hoche into Ireland. The most extraordinary efforts were made
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
nt to intercepts a French fleet of twenty-five ships of the line and many smaller vessels, which had sailed from Brest for America. The fleets passed each other in a thick fog. All but two of the French vessels reached Quebec, and nine of them soon afterwards returned to France. In 1759 a British force, under Commander Boy, blockaded a French fleet in the port of Dunkirk. The French commander, seizing a favorable opportunity, not only escaped from his enemy, but attacked the coast of Scotland, and cruised about till the next year, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty one British ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France. A still more remarkable case occurred in 1796, when the French attempted to throw the army of Hoche into Ireland. The most extraordinary efforts were made by the British naval authorities to intercept the French fleet in its passage. Three fleets were put on guard: one, the Channel fleet, under Lord Bri
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): article 2
ta, and it slipped out of port, followed by Nelson, who tried two courses for Alexandria, and missed the French in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous; the fleets actually crossed each other on a certain night; yet Nelson could see nothing of them himself, and heard nothing of them from merchant vessels. In 1805 another Toulon fleet escaped from Nelson. He sought for it in vain in the Mediterranean; then proceeded to the West Indies; then back to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce of its adversary. We have seen how for years a few Confederate vessels have foiled the whole naval power of the United States. --Whenever they have come in
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
ck to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce of its adversary. We have seen how for years a few Confederate vessels have foiled the whole naval power of the United States. --Whenever they have come in collision with a Yankee man-of-war they have whipped her, but the cases of collision have been only two in three years. Such facts should stimulate our people to put privateers afloat on every sea. There is no branch of warlike enterprise which offers such inducements.--The risks are small; the profits immense.--The ocean is a big pond, and full of big fish. The angling is almost as safe as on a river bank, and the returns vastly more remunerative. Let us
Trafalgar (Spain) (search for this): article 2
in both. The sea was narrow; the vessels numerous; the fleets actually crossed each other on a certain night; yet Nelson could see nothing of them himself, and heard nothing of them from merchant vessels. In 1805 another Toulon fleet escaped from Nelson. He sought for it in vain in the Mediterranean; then proceeded to the West Indies; then back to Europe, along the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, and off the English Channel. But all in vain. When they did meet at last at Trafalgar it was because both fleets were willing to try the issue of a battle. If great squadrons can thus elude the vigilance of an enemy, how much more easily single ships, built for speed, and designed to prey upon the commerce of its adversary. We have seen how for years a few Confederate vessels have foiled the whole naval power of the United States. --Whenever they have come in collision with a Yankee man-of-war they have whipped her, but the cases of collision have been only two in thr
Brest (France) (search for this): article 2
e them back upon the coast of France for shelter. In 1755 an English fleet of several ships of the line and some frigates were sent to intercepts a French fleet of twenty-five ships of the line and many smaller vessels, which had sailed from Brest for America. The fleets passed each other in a thick fog. All but two of the French vessels reached Quebec, and nine of them soon afterwards returned to France. In 1759 a British force, under Commander Boy, blockaded a French fleet in the pe. Three fleets were put on guard: one, the Channel fleet, under Lord Bridport, consisting of thirty sail of the line, was stationed close on the British shores; a second, under Curtis, in the Downs; a third, under Colpays, watched the harbor of Brest. Yet the French fleet of forty-four vessels, carrying a land force of twenty- five thousand men, actually passed unobserved these three lines of coast guard, though it occupied eight days in making the passage and three more in landing the troop
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