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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Death of Gen. Albert G. Jenkins. Intelligence has been received of the death of Brig. Gen. Albert G. Jenkins, who was severely wounded in the fight near Dublin Depot, Southwestern Virginia, on the 8th inst. It is but a few days since a dispatch was received announcing his improving condition, and his friends looked forward with pleasure to the period of his recovery, and his restoration to a position of usefulness to his State and country. But his strength gave way under the operation of the removal of an arm at the shoulder joint, and be failed to rally again. Gen. Jenkins was a member of the old United States Congress, and was elected to the First Congress of the Confederate States, but resigned the latter position under the belief that he could be of more service to the country in the army.--He proved his gallantry on several occasions, and at last sealed with his blood his devotion to the cause. He was a gentleman of talents, had earned distinction in the forum as well as
the morning of the 12th Johnson's division occupied the right of Ewell's corps. Haves's brigade being on his left; then J. M. Walkers, (Stonewall,) next Jones's. And then Stewart's. At the junction of Jones's and Stewart's brigades, the line of works made a bend at nearly a right angle, in which a battalion of artillery had been posted.--The artillery had been withdrawn the proceeding evening, and the line of Jones's brigade was extended to cover this gap. At 3 o'clock on the morning of the 12th, Johnson asked for artillery, saying the enemy was massing heavily in his front, and Page's battalion was started to him. Jones's brigade of six regiments had but three in line when the assault was made at 4 o'clock; one had been detached to cover the gap of half a mile between Stewart's brigade and Lane's brigade of Wilcox's division in the right, one had been deployed as skirmishers, another had just been sent out to relieve the latter. The enemy made their attack in mess with a rush upon
the North Anna river, some twenty-five miles due north from Richmond. By reference to the map the reader will see that Grant, having moved to the right of Spotsylvania C. H. across the Ny, the northern branch of the Mattaponi, might safety throw his army down the east bank of the latter stream on our right flank, advancing all the time upon the are of a circle in the direction of Richmond. Gen. Lee was informed of this movement, and succeeded in checking it momentarily on the evening of the 19th, when Ewell marched out of the trenches and struck the enemy in flank and rear. The Federal army having been transferred to the east side of the headwaters of the Mattaponi, which it was impossible to prevent, and having commenced to move down and probably across to the south side of that river, no alternative was left Gen. Lee but to make a new disposition of his forces. The intervention of the river and the dense woods between the Mat, the Ta, the Po and the Ny (from which is derived the
March 9th (search for this): article 4
ted by the "General Association of the Chaplains and Missionaries of the Army of Tennessee, " asking that ministers of the Gospel now in the ranks be appointed to the position of chaplains, when properly recommended and qualified for the sacred office: Confederate States of America, Executive Department, Richmond, Va., April 19th, 1864. Rev. Chas. H. Atkin, Rev. J. S. Chapman, and Rev. W. Mooney, committee, Dalton. Ga: Gentlemen: The President has received your letter of March 9th, and directs me to express to you his deep sense of the importance of regular and earnest religious instruction and consolation to our brave soldiers. He does not presume to doubt the necessity of chaplains in full number, and knows of no bar to the promotion of such from the ranks. On the other hand, he considers the spirit which prompts ministers to volunteer as privates and serve their country in so glorious and trying a position as an earnest of their fitness for the duties of chapla
it, and at the same time added, "Gen. Butler is a gentleman and a man of his word, he will fulfill to the letter every promise; he is a man of strong feelings, but when a friend he is a friend indeed, as when an enemy he is an enemy of the most bitter kind." Up to Saturday last, Mrs. Copeland had not received one word of reply from the Beast, nor do we suppose she ever will. From Gen. Lee's army. The following official dispatch was received yesterday morning: Hanover Junction, May 23, 10 P. M. Hon. James A. Seddon: About noon to-day the enemy approached the telegraph bridge on the North Anna.--In the afternoon he attacked the guard at the bridge and drove it to this side. About the same time the 5th corps (Gen. Warren's,) crossed at Jericho Ford, on our left, and was attacked by Gen. A. P. Hill and his advance checked. R. E. Lee. The telegraph bridge, mentioned in the foregoing dispatch, is the bridge on which the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad
Army Northern Virginia,Hanover Junction, May 23d. Yesterday the army took position behind the North Anna river, some twenty-five miles due north from Richmond. By reference to the map the reader will see that Grant, having moved to the right of Spotsylvania C. H. across the Ny, the northern branch of the Mattaponi, might safety throw his army down the east bank of the latter stream on our right flank, advancing all the time upon the are of a circle in the direction of Richmond. Gen. Lee was informed of this movement, and succeeded in checking it momentarily on the evening of the 19th, when Ewell marched out of the trenches and struck the enemy in flank and rear. The Federal army having been transferred to the east side of the headwaters of the Mattaponi, which it was impossible to prevent, and having commenced to move down and probably across to the south side of that river, no alternative was left Gen. Lee but to make a new disposition of his forces. The intervention of the
From North Georgia. Atlanta, May 23. --The press reporter left the front at noon to-day. There has been very little skirmishing for the last two days, mostly on the left of the main body.--The enemy seem to have abandoned the line of railroad, and they are attempting to mass on our left to support the flanking column under McPherson, who is moving on Dalton. These developments of the enemy's plan render necessary a further change of position on our part. These have been made, so that Johnston remains master of the situation. There is no straggling, and the troops are in fine spirits and confident. The Mayor his issued a proclamation for all citizens not in any organization to report for orders, and devising non combatants to leave the city.
From Yankeedom. Petersburg, May 24. --Northern dates to the 21st have been received. Grant telegraphs that an effort was made on Thursday evening by Ewell's corps to turn the Yankee right, which was promptly repulsed. Three hundred prisoners fell into Yankee hands, besides many killed and wounded. Yankee loss 600 wounded, 150 killed and missing. Stanton assures the Northern press that over 25,000 veteran reinforcements have been sent to Grant. There are no reports from Butler. The Red river is blockaded at many points by rebel shore batteries. Gen. Canby, who is about to assume command, promises to remove them early. Sigel has been removed, and Major General Hunter succeeds him. A dispatch from Sherman, dated Thursday night, at Kinston, states that during that day he had pushed a column round Kinston, in pursuit of Johnston, as far as Cassville. A hard fight for Atlanta is looked for. The Herald states that among the passengers on bo
January 24th, 1743 AD (search for this): article 8
n circulation is shown by the following authentic account of the number of days a bank note issued in London remains in circulation: £5 note, 72.7; £10, 77; £20, 57.4, £80, 18.9; £10, 13.7; £50, 88.8; £100, 28.4; £200, 12.7; £300, 10.6; £500, 11.8; £1,000, 11.1. The exceptions to these averages are few, and therefore remarkable. The time during which some notes remain unpresented is beckoned by the century. On the 27th of September, 1864, a £50 note was presented, hearing date 24th January, 1743. Another, for £10, issued on the 19th of November, 1762, was not paid till the 20th of April, 1845. There is a legend extant of the eccentric possessor of a £1,000 note who kept it framed and glazed for a series of years, preferring to feast his eyes upon it to putting the amount it represented out at interest. It was converted into gold, however, without a day's loss of time by his hire, on his demise--4 fact which can very easily be credited. Stolen and lost notes are ge
November 19th, 1762 AD (search for this): article 8
unt of the number of days a bank note issued in London remains in circulation: £5 note, 72.7; £10, 77; £20, 57.4, £80, 18.9; £10, 13.7; £50, 88.8; £100, 28.4; £200, 12.7; £300, 10.6; £500, 11.8; £1,000, 11.1. The exceptions to these averages are few, and therefore remarkable. The time during which some notes remain unpresented is beckoned by the century. On the 27th of September, 1864, a £50 note was presented, hearing date 24th January, 1743. Another, for £10, issued on the 19th of November, 1762, was not paid till the 20th of April, 1845. There is a legend extant of the eccentric possessor of a £1,000 note who kept it framed and glazed for a series of years, preferring to feast his eyes upon it to putting the amount it represented out at interest. It was converted into gold, however, without a day's loss of time by his hire, on his demise--4 fact which can very easily be credited. Stolen and lost notes are generally long absentees. The former usually make their
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