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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 12 total hits in 8 results.

Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
The mails over the Greensboro' Railroad. To the Editor of the Dispatch: In your paper of yesterday you copy an article from the Danville Appeal, which does great on justice to the Post master General, and as I am cognizant of all the facts in the case. I appeal to your sense of justice to publish the following as explanation of the matter of which the Appeal complains. Immediately on the completion of the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia,
Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
The mails over the Greensboro' Railroad. To the Editor of the Dispatch: In your paper of yesterday you copy an article from the Danville Appeal, which does great on justice to the Post master General, and as I am cognizant of all the facts in the case. I appeal to your sense of justice to publish the following as explanation of the matter of which the Appeal complains. Immediately on the completion of the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia,
tice to the Post master General, and as I am cognizant of all the facts in the case. I appeal to your sense of justice to publish the following as explanation of the matter of which the Appeal complains. Immediately on the completion of the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia, S. C, for daily mail trains, with further understanding that they would run double daily mail trains if not prevented by the accessibly for military transportation. By this sch
ailroad. To the Editor of the Dispatch: In your paper of yesterday you copy an article from the Danville Appeal, which does great on justice to the Post master General, and as I am cognizant of all the facts in the case. I appeal to your sense of justice to publish the following as explanation of the matter of which the Appeal complains. Immediately on the completion of the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia, S. C, for daily mail trains, with
ay you copy an article from the Danville Appeal, which does great on justice to the Post master General, and as I am cognizant of all the facts in the case. I appeal to your sense of justice to publish the following as explanation of the matter of which the Appeal complains. Immediately on the completion of the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia, S. C, for daily mail trains, with further understanding that they would run double daily mail trains if
April, 6 AD (search for this): article 3
, S. C, for daily mail trains, with further understanding that they would run double daily mail trains if not prevented by the accessibly for military transportation. By this schedule the mails are to go from Richmond the Charlotte, N. C, in twenty-four hours, and the only reason why it was not put in operation at once was the fact that the Presidents of these roads found it impracticable to make the necessary arrangements and changes to put this schedule into effect before Saturday, the 4th of June, at which time it is hoped that they will be ready; so than not a day was lost by the Postmaster General in endeavoring to put the highest grade of mail service on this route, with close connections, and the highest attainable rate of speed Perhaps the Danville Appeal will be as ready to exercise its risibles, "if it were not too serious a matter for laughter," at its own ignorance in as suming to write about a matter of which it knew nothing, and about which it made no reasonable inq
December, 5 AD (search for this): article 3
The mails over the Greensboro' Railroad. To the Editor of the Dispatch: In your paper of yesterday you copy an article from the Danville Appeal, which does great on justice to the Post master General, and as I am cognizant of all the facts in the case. I appeal to your sense of justice to publish the following as explanation of the matter of which the Appeal complains. Immediately on the completion of the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia,
the railroad from Danville to Greensboro', N. C, on the 21st of May, the Postmaster General telegraphed to Mr Johnson, the President of the Columbia and Charlotte railroad, and to Mr Webb, the President of the North Carolina railroad, to meet him and Mr. Harvie, the President of the Piedmont railroad, at once, so as to agree to a cross and quick schedule for the mails, seven times a week, from Richmond to Columbia, S C. The Presidents of these three roads met the Postmaster General on the 25th May, and agreed on a schedule with close connections from Richmond to Columbia, S. C, for daily mail trains, with further understanding that they would run double daily mail trains if not prevented by the accessibly for military transportation. By this schedule the mails are to go from Richmond the Charlotte, N. C, in twenty-four hours, and the only reason why it was not put in operation at once was the fact that the Presidents of these roads found it impracticable to make the necessary arrang