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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
roth whish he died this afternoon about 2 o'clock. He was one to the best and bravest officers Georgia has ever sent to the field, and one of the most promising, morally and intellectually. He graduated a short time before the war broke out at West Point, and served some time with General Jackson, who was so much impressed by his merits that he recommended him for the appointment of Brigadier General. Indeed, young as he was, he had attracted the attention of Gen Lee, Gen Ewell, and of almost y past our right, advancing each time somewhat nearer to Richmond. His great desire now is to form a junction with Butler, either by bringing Butler to him, or, what is more probable, by going himself to Butier. He has established his base at West Point, at the confluence of the Pamunkey and Mattapony, whence his supplies are sent by boats of light draft to White House, and thence by wagons to his army. Let us hope that when he attempts to cross the narrow peninsula between the Pamunkey and t
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
n of the enemy's left wing. Pegrant's brigade, commanded by Col Edwin Willis, of the 12th Georgia, alone was engaged. A sharp combat ensued, in the course of which it became necessary to charge upon one of the enemy's batteries, with a view to its capture. The brigade behaved handsomely, and was gallantly led, but unfortunately Col Willis received a mortal wound in the groin from a grape shot, froth whish he died this afternoon about 2 o'clock. He was one to the best and bravest officers Georgia has ever sent to the field, and one of the most promising, morally and intellectually. He graduated a short time before the war broke out at West Point, and served some time with General Jackson, who was so much impressed by his merits that he recommended him for the appointment of Brigadier General. Indeed, young as he was, he had attracted the attention of Gen Lee, Gen Ewell, and of almost every prominent officer in the army. There is hardly an officer in the entire army who did not kn
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
From General Lee's army. [from our own correspondent.] Army on Northern Virginia,Banks of the Chickahominy, May 31, 1864. We are too near to the enemy to speak with much particularity of the military condition in front of Richmond. Grant, as you are aware, has brought his whole army across to the south side of the Pamunkey. His right rests on or near the Central Railway, and his left on the Tolopotomcy creek, whilst his front is protected by two strong lines of entrenchments running for some distance along the crest of the hills on the north side of the last mentioned stream. His position is a strong one--so strong, indeed, that I hope Gen Lee will be able to give him battle upon some other field. A reconnaissance was made yesterday afternoon to ascertain the true position of the enemy's left wing. Pegrant's brigade, commanded by Col Edwin Willis, of the 12th Georgia, alone was engaged. A sharp combat ensued, in the course of which it became necessary to charge upo
Edwin Willis (search for this): article 9
one--so strong, indeed, that I hope Gen Lee will be able to give him battle upon some other field. A reconnaissance was made yesterday afternoon to ascertain the true position of the enemy's left wing. Pegrant's brigade, commanded by Col Edwin Willis, of the 12th Georgia, alone was engaged. A sharp combat ensued, in the course of which it became necessary to charge upon one of the enemy's batteries, with a view to its capture. The brigade behaved handsomely, and was gallantly led, but unfortunately Col Willis received a mortal wound in the groin from a grape shot, froth whish he died this afternoon about 2 o'clock. He was one to the best and bravest officers Georgia has ever sent to the field, and one of the most promising, morally and intellectually. He graduated a short time before the war broke out at West Point, and served some time with General Jackson, who was so much impressed by his merits that he recommended him for the appointment of Brigadier General. Indeed, young
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