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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 19 total hits in 7 results.

New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 13
Extraordinary Torpedo Doings. --We learn from a well-informed correspondent that on Friday last the Yankees at Newbern sent out to Batchelor's creek four large torpedoes, to be "planted in the Neuse at Spring Garden, ten miles from Newbern, to guard against any rebel gunboats likely to be sent down upon them. At this point tNewbern, to guard against any rebel gunboats likely to be sent down upon them. At this point they were removed from the cars to the commissary building. Three of them had been safely deposited, but the fourth, on entering the building, was struck so violently that the machine exploded. The explosion "set off" the building and its contents at a rapid rate through the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, werel on that tower has yet been found our informant has not heard of it. The explosion was heard twenty miles, and created great counteraction in the gar- rison at Newbern. the long roll was beaten, signal guns were fired, and every preparation was quickly made to meet the rebels. Such a scene of wild confusion is said to have exi
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 13
ough the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, were "within range" of the missiles, of whom 63 were instantly killed, the rest wounded. Amongst the killed is a notorious Yankee villain, Lt. Willis. We learn, also, that Hezekiah Davis, an old citizen of that neighborhood, was present and was killed. At the scene of the disaster, it is said, the Yankees had erected a tall tower or lookout, on the top of which a Yankee was at the time posted. The tower suddenly disappeared, and if the sentinel on that tower has yet been found our informant has not heard of it. The explosion was heard twenty miles, and created great counteraction in the gar- rison at Newbern. the long roll was beaten, signal guns were fired, and every preparation was quickly made to meet the rebels. Such a scene of wild confusion is said to have existed in the good old town as has never been exceeded, except in the immediate vicinity of the explosion. --Goldsboro' (N. C) State Journal, 3d inst.
Spring Garden (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 13
Extraordinary Torpedo Doings. --We learn from a well-informed correspondent that on Friday last the Yankees at Newbern sent out to Batchelor's creek four large torpedoes, to be "planted in the Neuse at Spring Garden, ten miles from Newbern, to guard against any rebel gunboats likely to be sent down upon them. At this point they were removed from the cars to the commissary building. Three of them had been safely deposited, but the fourth, on entering the building, was struck so violently that the machine exploded. The explosion "set off" the building and its contents at a rapid rate through the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, were "within range" of the missiles, of whom 63 were instantly killed, the rest wounded. Amongst the killed is a notorious Yankee villain, Lt. Willis. We learn, also, that Hezekiah Davis, an old citizen of that neighborhood, was present and was killed. At the scene of the disaster, it is said, the Yankees had erected a tall tow
Hezekiah Davis (search for this): article 13
moved from the cars to the commissary building. Three of them had been safely deposited, but the fourth, on entering the building, was struck so violently that the machine exploded. The explosion "set off" the building and its contents at a rapid rate through the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, were "within range" of the missiles, of whom 63 were instantly killed, the rest wounded. Amongst the killed is a notorious Yankee villain, Lt. Willis. We learn, also, that Hezekiah Davis, an old citizen of that neighborhood, was present and was killed. At the scene of the disaster, it is said, the Yankees had erected a tall tower or lookout, on the top of which a Yankee was at the time posted. The tower suddenly disappeared, and if the sentinel on that tower has yet been found our informant has not heard of it. The explosion was heard twenty miles, and created great counteraction in the gar- rison at Newbern. the long roll was beaten, signal guns were fired, and
on them. At this point they were removed from the cars to the commissary building. Three of them had been safely deposited, but the fourth, on entering the building, was struck so violently that the machine exploded. The explosion "set off" the building and its contents at a rapid rate through the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, were "within range" of the missiles, of whom 63 were instantly killed, the rest wounded. Amongst the killed is a notorious Yankee villain, Lt. Willis. We learn, also, that Hezekiah Davis, an old citizen of that neighborhood, was present and was killed. At the scene of the disaster, it is said, the Yankees had erected a tall tower or lookout, on the top of which a Yankee was at the time posted. The tower suddenly disappeared, and if the sentinel on that tower has yet been found our informant has not heard of it. The explosion was heard twenty miles, and created great counteraction in the gar- rison at Newbern. the long roll was
Extraordinary Torpedo Doings. --We learn from a well-informed correspondent that on Friday last the Yankees at Newbern sent out to Batchelor's creek four large torpedoes, to be "planted in the Neuse at Spring Garden, ten miles from Newbern, to guard against any rebel gunboats likely to be sent down upon them. At this point they were removed from the cars to the commissary building. Three of them had been safely deposited, but the fourth, on entering the building, was struck so violently that the machine exploded. The explosion "set off" the building and its contents at a rapid rate through the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, were "within range" of the missiles, of whom 63 were instantly killed, the rest wounded. Amongst the killed is a notorious Yankee villain, Lt. Willis. We learn, also, that Hezekiah Davis, an old citizen of that neighborhood, was present and was killed. At the scene of the disaster, it is said, the Yankees had erected a tall tow
rough the air. One hundred men, including twenty negroes, were "within range" of the missiles, of whom 63 were instantly killed, the rest wounded. Amongst the killed is a notorious Yankee villain, Lt. Willis. We learn, also, that Hezekiah Davis, an old citizen of that neighborhood, was present and was killed. At the scene of the disaster, it is said, the Yankees had erected a tall tower or lookout, on the top of which a Yankee was at the time posted. The tower suddenly disappeared, and if the sentinel on that tower has yet been found our informant has not heard of it. The explosion was heard twenty miles, and created great counteraction in the gar- rison at Newbern. the long roll was beaten, signal guns were fired, and every preparation was quickly made to meet the rebels. Such a scene of wild confusion is said to have existed in the good old town as has never been exceeded, except in the immediate vicinity of the explosion. --Goldsboro' (N. C) State Journal, 3d inst.