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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
hat the Danville road, although it is Davis's sole means of connection with the South and West, is at the same time a most effective line. Fither Kautz or Sheridan should therefore give it his immediate and earnest attention. Burkesville is its vital centre. If it is to be cut, that is the point for the operation. Eight or ten miles of road destroyed south and west of the junction there, will isolate Richmond from Lynchburg, Gordonsville, North Carolina, and the whole South. "The James river canal, we believe, is receiving the requisite attention." From Prince George. We have advices from Prince George Court House as late as yesterday morning. The enemy then had an enormous wagon train at that point.--This, it was stated by officers, was to furnish the troops who were to invest Petersburg. A Yankee Nest broken up. For the past few days the enemy on our extreme left have occupied the residence of Capt J. Alexander Pace, in Prince George county, known as "Gre
Ford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ated the prisoners in the jail. During the afternoon of Wednesday, the raiders reached the Southside railroad, cut the wires and tore up the track between Ford's Depot and Wilson's. At Ford's, they burnt the depot, water tanks, and two long trains of cars, with engines attached, belonging to the Norfolk railroad. At the fiftFord's, they burnt the depot, water tanks, and two long trains of cars, with engines attached, belonging to the Norfolk railroad. At the fifteen mile post, this side of Ford's, they overturned about one and a half miles of the railroad track. Yesterday, at half-past 1 P M, the operator at Burkesville Junction informed the operator in this city, via Richmond, that the raiders were then within three miles of the Junction, and at 2 P M the "circuit" was broken, and nFord's, they overturned about one and a half miles of the railroad track. Yesterday, at half-past 1 P M, the operator at Burkesville Junction informed the operator in this city, via Richmond, that the raiders were then within three miles of the Junction, and at 2 P M the "circuit" was broken, and no communication with the operator at Burkesville has been held since. The enemy has undoubtedly reached that point, and there injured the Danville as well as the Southside road. There is much property here of value, owned by both companies, and we fear it will all fall a prey to the vandalism of our desperate but cowardly enemie
Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
that Davis has left. This, however, is a very important road on account of his connections. At Burkesville, fifty-three miles from Richmond, and the same distance from Petersburg, it connects with the Lynchburg road, furnishing communication with that place and also with Gordonsville, although by a long and inconvenient circuit. From Burkesville, the Richmond and Danville road extends eighty seven miles to Danville on the boundary of North Carolina, and hence a short link of railroad to Greensboro', constructed by the rebels since the beginning of the war, connects it with the whole system of North Carolina railways. "It will thus be seen that the Danville road, although it is Davis's sole means of connection with the South and West, is at the same time a most effective line. Fither Kautz or Sheridan should therefore give it his immediate and earnest attention. Burkesville is its vital centre. If it is to be cut, that is the point for the operation. Eight or ten miles of r
Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
here from the main command, and that there was a probability yesterday morning of their capture. The hope, however, has now vanished, since Grant's infantry now occupy the railroad between Reams's and Petersburg. The raiders reached Dinwiddie Court House by twelve o'clock, and here their rear guard was over taken again by our cavalry during the afternoon, and another skirmish ensued, resulting in the capture of ten prisoners and thirteen horses. At Dinwiddie Court House the enemy stole aDinwiddie Court House the enemy stole all the horses and liberated the prisoners in the jail. During the afternoon of Wednesday, the raiders reached the Southside railroad, cut the wires and tore up the track between Ford's Depot and Wilson's. At Ford's, they burnt the depot, water tanks, and two long trains of cars, with engines attached, belonging to the Norfolk railroad. At the fifteen mile post, this side of Ford's, they overturned about one and a half miles of the railroad track. Yesterday, at half-past 1 P M, the op
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
hburg road, furnishing communication with that place and also with Gordonsville, although by a long and inconvenient circuit. From Burkesville, the Richmond and Danville road extends eighty seven miles to Danville on the boundary of North Carolina, and hence a short link of railroad to Greensboro', constructed by the rebels sinceDanville on the boundary of North Carolina, and hence a short link of railroad to Greensboro', constructed by the rebels since the beginning of the war, connects it with the whole system of North Carolina railways. "It will thus be seen that the Danville road, although it is Davis's sole means of connection with the South and West, is at the same time a most effective line. Fither Kautz or Sheridan should therefore give it his immediate and earnesDanville road, although it is Davis's sole means of connection with the South and West, is at the same time a most effective line. Fither Kautz or Sheridan should therefore give it his immediate and earnest attention. Burkesville is its vital centre. If it is to be cut, that is the point for the operation. Eight or ten miles of road destroyed south and west of the junction there, will isolate Richmond from Lynchburg, Gordonsville, North Carolina, and the whole South. "The James river canal, we believe, is receiving the requ
Burkesville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
n within three miles of the Junction, and at 2 P M the "circuit" was broken, and no communication with the operator at Burkesville has been held since. The enemy has undoubtedly reached that point, and there injured the Danville as well as the Soutwhich is the only one that Davis has left. This, however, is a very important road on account of his connections. At Burkesville, fifty-three miles from Richmond, and the same distance from Petersburg, it connects with the Lynchburg road, furnishing communication with that place and also with Gordonsville, although by a long and inconvenient circuit. From Burkesville, the Richmond and Danville road extends eighty seven miles to Danville on the boundary of North Carolina, and hence a short le time a most effective line. Fither Kautz or Sheridan should therefore give it his immediate and earnest attention. Burkesville is its vital centre. If it is to be cut, that is the point for the operation. Eight or ten miles of road destroyed s
Reams (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
re supposed to number about 4,000. They comprise the whole of Wilson's division, who commands in person, and is accompanied by Kautz and Spears. They remained at Reams's some three hours, and destroyed the water tanks, wood sheds and office. The track was also torn up for a distance of about 150 yards. All the citizens in the vi gladly welcomed. Buggles and carriages were also taken. The rear guard of the enemy was encountered by a portion of Gen. W. H. F. Lee's cavalry before they left Reams's, and a brief fight ensued, which resulted in the killing and capturing of some fifteen or twenty of the gang. It is stated that about 150 were cut off here from, and that there was a probability yesterday morning of their capture. The hope, however, has now vanished, since Grant's infantry now occupy the railroad between Reams's and Petersburg. The raiders reached Dinwiddie Court House by twelve o'clock, and here their rear guard was over taken again by our cavalry during the afterno
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
ille, although by a long and inconvenient circuit. From Burkesville, the Richmond and Danville road extends eighty seven miles to Danville on the boundary of North Carolina, and hence a short link of railroad to Greensboro', constructed by the rebels since the beginning of the war, connects it with the whole system of North CarolNorth Carolina railways. "It will thus be seen that the Danville road, although it is Davis's sole means of connection with the South and West, is at the same time a most effective line. Fither Kautz or Sheridan should therefore give it his immediate and earnest attention. Burkesville is its vital centre. If it is to be cut, that is the point for the operation. Eight or ten miles of road destroyed south and west of the junction there, will isolate Richmond from Lynchburg, Gordonsville, North Carolina, and the whole South. "The James river canal, we believe, is receiving the requisite attention." From Prince George. We have advices from Prince
Prince Georges (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
le South. "The James river canal, we believe, is receiving the requisite attention." From Prince George. We have advices from Prince George Court House as late as yesterday morning. The enemy then had an enormous wagon train at that point.--This, it was stated by officers, was to furnish the troops who were to invest Petersburg. A Yankee Nest broken up. For the past few days the enemy on our extreme left have occupied the residence of Capt J. Alexander Pace, in Prince George county, known as "Green Croft," and opposite to the New Market race course. Here they have been luxuriating on fresh vegetables and ripe fruits, and enjoying themselves hugely. Yesterday one of our batteries determined to disturb the "happy family," and for this purpose most unceremoniously plunged a shell through the building. An eye witness informs us that been never poured from a hive faster and in greater numbers than did the blue coats from this house. They swarmed in the yard, gard
James F. Smith (search for this): article 2
pplies from our army. That this is his now settled policy there can be scarcely a doubt, and it is clearly foreshadowed in the following editorial which we find in the Philadelphia Inquirer, of Monday last: "Jeff Davis's means for supplying his army near Richmond, and for swift communication with his Southern dominions, consist of three railroads and a canal. The railroads are the Virginia Central, just broken up by Sheridan, at Trevillian; the Richmond and Petersburg, now cut off by Smith at one end and Butler at the other, and the Richmond and Danville, which is the only one that Davis has left. This, however, is a very important road on account of his connections. At Burkesville, fifty-three miles from Richmond, and the same distance from Petersburg, it connects with the Lynchburg road, furnishing communication with that place and also with Gordonsville, although by a long and inconvenient circuit. From Burkesville, the Richmond and Danville road extends eighty seven mil
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