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Big Shanty (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 10
From Georgia — the battle of Kennesaw Mountain. We are indebted to Mr W C Barnes, of the Southern Express Company, for files of Atlanta papers to the 26th of June. The victory reported by Gen Johnston occurred on the 27th, and of course no account of that is given in these journals; but they contain the details of the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, on the 22d, which will be read with interest. A correspondent of the Atlanta Intelligencer, writing from the front June 23d, thus describes theKennesaw Mountain, on the 22d, which will be read with interest. A correspondent of the Atlanta Intelligencer, writing from the front June 23d, thus describes the engagement: On yesterday morning the enemy held possession of a ridge on the Powder Spring road, which commanded the country around for some distance, and which was deemed desirable for our army. Our cavalry held possession of it previously, but on the approach of the Yankees fell back and abandoned the important position. Accordingly, Major Gen Stevenson was ordered in the evening to attack and carry the ridge by storm. It was not supposed that the enemy had fortified himself in so s
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 10
From Georgia — the battle of Kennesaw Mountain. We are indebted to Mr W C Barnes, of the Southern Express Company, for files of Atlanta papers to the 26th of June. The victory reported by Gen Johnston occurred on the 27th, and of course no account of that is given in these journals; but they contain the details of the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, on the 22d, which will be read with interest. A correspondent of the Atlanta Intelligencer, writing from the front June 23d, thus describes theand firm conduct while under a terrific fire. So severe was the fire, and so thick did the Minnie balls fly about, that almost instantaneously, Colonel Trigg, commanding Reynolds's brigade, Capt Mathews, A A G, Capt J H Jossey, a gallant son of Georgia, and Lieut Patton, all of Reynolds's staff, and gallant and chivalrous officers, had their horses shot under them. Capt Whitfield of the same staff had his right arm paralysed by a blow on the shoulder from a piece of spent shell. In Brown's b
Powder Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 10
the Southern Express Company, for files of Atlanta papers to the 26th of June. The victory reported by Gen Johnston occurred on the 27th, and of course no account of that is given in these journals; but they contain the details of the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, on the 22d, which will be read with interest. A correspondent of the Atlanta Intelligencer, writing from the front June 23d, thus describes the engagement: On yesterday morning the enemy held possession of a ridge on the Powder Spring road, which commanded the country around for some distance, and which was deemed desirable for our army. Our cavalry held possession of it previously, but on the approach of the Yankees fell back and abandoned the important position. Accordingly, Major Gen Stevenson was ordered in the evening to attack and carry the ridge by storm. It was not supposed that the enemy had fortified himself in so short a space of time, and an easy success was anticipated. The necessary orders having
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 10
From Georgia — the battle of Kennesaw Mountain. We are indebted to Mr W C Barnes, of the Southern Express Company, for files of Atlanta papers to the 26th of June. The victory reported by Gen Johnston occurred on the 27th, and of course no account of that is given in these journals; but they contain the details of the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, on the 22d, which will be read with interest. A correspondent of the Atlanta Intelligencer, writing from the front June 23d, thus describes the Va, was wounded, as also Majors Harman, of the 54th Va, and Dula, of 58th N C. The only field officers I have heard of in Pettus's brigade as being wounded are Adj't J H Brooks, of the 46th, and Major Davis, of the 26th, Ala regiments. The Atlanta Appeal says: We are pleased to learn that our loss in the charge of Stevenson's division on Wednesday evening, will not exceed five to six hundred. We drove the enemy back for three quarters of a mile, but the enemy being massed behind th
nt officer, was killed by a shell, which struck him on the head, shattering it and causing instant death. His loss will be felt in the brigade. Adj't J M Douglass, of the 18th Tenn, was also killed. The wounded are Major J P Brewster, 56th Ga; Lt Col Bradly, 34th Ga: Adj't slide, 2d Ga State Troops, all of Cumming's brigade. In Brown's brigade, Lt Col Ed C Cook, 32d Tenn, in the arm and side; Col Saffell, 26th Tenn, was slightly wounded; Major McGuire, 22d; Adj't Fonte, 26th Tenn, and Capt Mathes, acting Major 3d Tenn, were wounded.--Col Cook commanded Brown's brigade, and is as gallant an officer as there is in our army. I trust he will soon recover. In Reynold's brigade, Col French of the 63d Va, was wounded, as also Majors Harman, of the 54th Va, and Dula, of 58th N C. The only field officers I have heard of in Pettus's brigade as being wounded are Adj't J H Brooks, of the 46th, and Major Davis, of the 26th, Ala regiments. The Atlanta Appeal says: We are please
reinforcements. The artillery they had on their picket lines was withdrawn as fast as our columns carried them, and this added to that already on their main line, kept up a continual fire of grape and canister in our rear, who retained the captured ground for three hours, when they were withdrawn in accordance with orders received, to our regular line of battle, the ridge, however, being still held by our forces. As soon as the men appeared in front of the Yankees' main line of battle Hindman's division came up on their right, and thus prevented the enemy from marching on the flank and opening a fire of musketry, which would have been very disastrous to our men. This charge was a brilliant and gallantly made one, and gave the Yankees a foretaste of what they may expect when the general engagement takes place. Reynolds's and Brown's brigades distinguished themselves by their heroic and firm conduct while under a terrific fire. So severe was the fire, and so thick did the M
ile under a terrific fire. So severe was the fire, and so thick did the Minnie balls fly about, that almost instantaneously, Colonel Trigg, commanding Reynolds's brigade, Capt Mathews, A A G, Capt J H Jossey, a gallant son of Georgia, and Lieut Patton, all of Reynolds's staff, and gallant and chivalrous officers, had their horses shot under them. Capt Whitfield of the same staff had his right arm paralysed by a blow on the shoulder from a piece of spent shell. In Brown's brigade, Capt H J Cheney, A A G, and Lieut J T Brown, A D C, had their horses shot while gallantly charging the enemy's works, and Capt G H Lowe, of the same staff, received a Minnie ball through his hat. The loss of field officers in very heavy. Col C H Walker, of the 3d Tenn, a gallant officer, was killed by a shell, which struck him on the head, shattering it and causing instant death. His loss will be felt in the brigade. Adj't J M Douglass, of the 18th Tenn, was also killed. The wounded are Major J P B
ing a fire of musketry, which would have been very disastrous to our men. This charge was a brilliant and gallantly made one, and gave the Yankees a foretaste of what they may expect when the general engagement takes place. Reynolds's and Brown's brigades distinguished themselves by their heroic and firm conduct while under a terrific fire. So severe was the fire, and so thick did the Minnie balls fly about, that almost instantaneously, Colonel Trigg, commanding Reynolds's brigade, Capt Mathews, A A G, Capt J H Jossey, a gallant son of Georgia, and Lieut Patton, all of Reynolds's staff, and gallant and chivalrous officers, had their horses shot under them. Capt Whitfield of the same staff had his right arm paralysed by a blow on the shoulder from a piece of spent shell. In Brown's brigade, Capt H J Cheney, A A G, and Lieut J T Brown, A D C, had their horses shot while gallantly charging the enemy's works, and Capt G H Lowe, of the same staff, received a Minnie ball through his
ut Patton, all of Reynolds's staff, and gallant and chivalrous officers, had their horses shot under them. Capt Whitfield of the same staff had his right arm paralysed by a blow on the shoulder from a piece of spent shell. In Brown's brigade, Capt H J Cheney, A A G, and Lieut J T Brown, A D C, had their horses shot while gallantly charging the enemy's works, and Capt G H Lowe, of the same staff, received a Minnie ball through his hat. The loss of field officers in very heavy. Col C H Walker, of the 3d Tenn, a gallant officer, was killed by a shell, which struck him on the head, shattering it and causing instant death. His loss will be felt in the brigade. Adj't J M Douglass, of the 18th Tenn, was also killed. The wounded are Major J P Brewster, 56th Ga; Lt Col Bradly, 34th Ga: Adj't slide, 2d Ga State Troops, all of Cumming's brigade. In Brown's brigade, Lt Col Ed C Cook, 32d Tenn, in the arm and side; Col Saffell, 26th Tenn, was slightly wounded; Major McGuire, 22d; Adj't
, A A G, and Lieut J T Brown, A D C, had their horses shot while gallantly charging the enemy's works, and Capt G H Lowe, of the same staff, received a Minnie ball through his hat. The loss of field officers in very heavy. Col C H Walker, of the 3d Tenn, a gallant officer, was killed by a shell, which struck him on the head, shattering it and causing instant death. His loss will be felt in the brigade. Adj't J M Douglass, of the 18th Tenn, was also killed. The wounded are Major J P Brewster, 56th Ga; Lt Col Bradly, 34th Ga: Adj't slide, 2d Ga State Troops, all of Cumming's brigade. In Brown's brigade, Lt Col Ed C Cook, 32d Tenn, in the arm and side; Col Saffell, 26th Tenn, was slightly wounded; Major McGuire, 22d; Adj't Fonte, 26th Tenn, and Capt Mathes, acting Major 3d Tenn, were wounded.--Col Cook commanded Brown's brigade, and is as gallant an officer as there is in our army. I trust he will soon recover. In Reynold's brigade, Col French of the 63d Va, was wounded, a
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