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Murray (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
From Sherman's rear. The Atlanta papers contain some intelligence from the rear of Sherman's army, brought to that city by our scouts. The intelligencer, says: A few days since a detachment of twenty-four men left Johnston's army for the purpose of breaking up a band of thirty desperadoes, composed of tones and Yankee soldiers, who were committing every species of depredation upon the families of Murray county. Mr. McGarrah says that on Monday last a portion of the detachment encountered this band of thieves and robbers, and one of the guides of the detachment, Martin Peeples, was killed, and seven of the enemy were killed and wounded; that on the next day the remainder of the band was attacked at Spring Peace, and seventeen more of the thieving scoundrels were killed and wounded. He says all the means that devilish malignity can invent, or Yankee ingenuity suggest, are resorted to to punish, harass, vex, and break the spirit of the people. He also states that prin
Big Shanty (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
his barbarous treatment our informant says that the spirit of our people there is as determined as ever before in its loyalty to the South.--The women especially exhibit no sign of yielding to the vandal foe; on the contrary, while they have to endure, they bid defiance to their vile oppressors: They have to submit, but they scorn and spit at the thieving vandals. The Atlanta Appeal says: A gentleman well known in this city, who left Cartersville, Ga., on Sunday last, reports that the Federals were shipping off the sick and wounded, and hospitals from that point towards Chattanooga, and all who had affiliated with the Yankees were selling off their personal effects. This, in connection with the burning of factories and mills indicates a movement either forward or rears aid of Sherman's army. The gentleman also states that, had Johnston remained three days longer at Kennesaw Mountain, Sherman would have retreated. The Federals admit that they have lost five to our one.
Texas Valley (Washington, United States) (search for this): article 3
he people. He also states that printed orders from Sherman were found upon the persons of some who were killed, directing that, after the 7th of this month, any citizen or soldier, without proper authority, caught within three miles of the railroad, should be immediately executed — that all citizens living within that distance of the railroad must move and their houses are to be burnt. The Confederacy has the following: Young McElreath in his trip visited the vicinity of Rome, Texas Valley, and other places in the enemy's lines. He reports that the enemy everywhere were committing great outrages upon the loyal inhabitants — especially was this the case with Blair's Seventeenth army corps, who were despoiling the farmers of their wheat and stock in every direction, and otherwise plundering and maltreating them. In the vicinity of Kingston, near Murchison's farm, which he visited, the inhabitants were being robbed of everything of value they possessed. Many of them had bee
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
From Sherman's rear. The Atlanta papers contain some intelligence from the rear of Sherman's army, brought to that city by our scouts. The intelligencer, says: A few days since a detachment of twenty-four men left Johnston's army for the purpose of breaking up a band of thirty desperadoes, composed of tones and Yankee soldiers, who were committing every species of depredation upon the families of Murray county. Mr. McGarrah says that on Monday last a portion of the detachment encouhe South.--The women especially exhibit no sign of yielding to the vandal foe; on the contrary, while they have to endure, they bid defiance to their vile oppressors: They have to submit, but they scorn and spit at the thieving vandals. The Atlanta Appeal says: A gentleman well known in this city, who left Cartersville, Ga., on Sunday last, reports that the Federals were shipping off the sick and wounded, and hospitals from that point towards Chattanooga, and all who had affiliated w
Cartersville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
they came across they killed. Under this barbarous treatment our informant says that the spirit of our people there is as determined as ever before in its loyalty to the South.--The women especially exhibit no sign of yielding to the vandal foe; on the contrary, while they have to endure, they bid defiance to their vile oppressors: They have to submit, but they scorn and spit at the thieving vandals. The Atlanta Appeal says: A gentleman well known in this city, who left Cartersville, Ga., on Sunday last, reports that the Federals were shipping off the sick and wounded, and hospitals from that point towards Chattanooga, and all who had affiliated with the Yankees were selling off their personal effects. This, in connection with the burning of factories and mills indicates a movement either forward or rears aid of Sherman's army. The gentleman also states that, had Johnston remained three days longer at Kennesaw Mountain, Sherman would have retreated. The Federals adm
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
their houses are to be burnt. The Confederacy has the following: Young McElreath in his trip visited the vicinity of Rome, Texas Valley, and other places in the enemy's lines. He reports that the enemy everywhere were committing great outrages upon the loyal inhabitants — especially was this the case with Blair's Seventeenth army corps, who were despoiling the farmers of their wheat and stock in every direction, and otherwise plundering and maltreating them. In the vicinity of Kingston, near Murchison's farm, which he visited, the inhabitants were being robbed of everything of value they possessed. Many of them had been hung up to limbs of trees in order to force them to give up what money or other valuables it was supposed they had concealed. Among them was Mr. Murchison himself, and an old negro man, the property of Maj. Woolly, from whom the thieves thus extracted some $600. Maj. Woolly's house, in that vicinity, is now the headquarters for some of the Yankee officer
e they possessed. Many of them had been hung up to limbs of trees in order to force them to give up what money or other valuables it was supposed they had concealed. Among them was Mr. Murchison himself, and an old negro man, the property of Maj. Woolly, from whom the thieves thus extracted some $600. Maj. Woolly's house, in that vicinity, is now the headquarters for some of the Yankee officers, while Mr. Murchison's is used as a boarding house for others of them. During Mr. McElreath'sMaj. Woolly's house, in that vicinity, is now the headquarters for some of the Yankee officers, while Mr. Murchison's is used as a boarding house for others of them. During Mr. McElreath's short stay within the enemy's lines, raiding parties were visiting the principal farms to secure the wheat as the farmers got it out, and to seize what corn they had. All the stock that they came across they killed. Under this barbarous treatment our informant says that the spirit of our people there is as determined as ever before in its loyalty to the South.--The women especially exhibit no sign of yielding to the vandal foe; on the contrary, while they have to endure, they bid defiance
From Sherman's rear. The Atlanta papers contain some intelligence from the rear of Sherman's army, brought to that city by our scouts. The intelligencer, says: A few days since a detachment of twenty-four men left Johnston's army for the purpose of breaking up a band of thirty desperadoes, composed of tones and Yankee soldiers, who were committing every species of depredation upon the families of Murray county. Mr. McGarrah says that on Monday last a portion of the detachment encountered this band of thieves and robbers, and one of the guides of the detachment, Martin Peeples, was killed, and seven of the enemy were killed and wounded; that on the next day the remainder of the band was attacked at Spring Peace, and seventeen more of the thieving scoundrels were killed and wounded. He says all the means that devilish malignity can invent, or Yankee ingenuity suggest, are resorted to to punish, harass, vex, and break the spirit of the people. He also states that print
Murchison (search for this): article 3
s, who were despoiling the farmers of their wheat and stock in every direction, and otherwise plundering and maltreating them. In the vicinity of Kingston, near Murchison's farm, which he visited, the inhabitants were being robbed of everything of value they possessed. Many of them had been hung up to limbs of trees in order to force them to give up what money or other valuables it was supposed they had concealed. Among them was Mr. Murchison himself, and an old negro man, the property of Maj. Woolly, from whom the thieves thus extracted some $600. Maj. Woolly's house, in that vicinity, is now the headquarters for some of the Yankee officers, while Mr. MuMr. Murchison's is used as a boarding house for others of them. During Mr. McElreath's short stay within the enemy's lines, raiding parties were visiting the principal farms to secure the wheat as the farmers got it out, and to seize what corn they had. All the stock that they came across they killed. Under this barbarous trea
Martin Peeples (search for this): article 3
Sherman's army, brought to that city by our scouts. The intelligencer, says: A few days since a detachment of twenty-four men left Johnston's army for the purpose of breaking up a band of thirty desperadoes, composed of tones and Yankee soldiers, who were committing every species of depredation upon the families of Murray county. Mr. McGarrah says that on Monday last a portion of the detachment encountered this band of thieves and robbers, and one of the guides of the detachment, Martin Peeples, was killed, and seven of the enemy were killed and wounded; that on the next day the remainder of the band was attacked at Spring Peace, and seventeen more of the thieving scoundrels were killed and wounded. He says all the means that devilish malignity can invent, or Yankee ingenuity suggest, are resorted to to punish, harass, vex, and break the spirit of the people. He also states that printed orders from Sherman were found upon the persons of some who were killed, directing th
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