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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 405 total hits in 194 results.

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On Thursday, the 28th of July, the North Carolina soldiers in camp vote for Governor, and on Thursday, the 4th of August, the citizens at home vote. Hon A A Shepperd died at his residence in Fors; county, N. C, on Monday, the 11th inst. He was a member of the old United States Congress from North Carolina.
4. "Hon J' A. Seddon, Sec'y of War: "All has been quiet to-day, except a little picket firing and occasional shells thrown into the city. J. B. Hood, General." The Associated Press dispatch, which we publish elsewhere, brings the latest news from Atlanta. It appears that many shells have entered the town, and though several houses have been struck, but little damage has resulted. From the Georgia papers, received last night, we gather some details of the fight on the 20th. The correspondent of the Appeal writes: "Finding that the enemy had crossed Peachtree creek and were attempting to turn his right, for the purpose of gaining possession of the railroad bridge, General Hood determined to attack their left, and Stewart's and Hardee's corps were ordered to advance upon them. The order to advance was received by the men with the wildest enthusiasm, and no sooner was the order given than the men swept forward with a yell such as only a rebel can give, and
At a meeting of the Council held on the 11th day of July, a petites, signed by several hundred citizens of the city, was presented, asking that Mr. Pleasant be reinstated as Captain of the Night Watch, or that a poll be opened in each ward in order that the people may re-elect him. This petition was read and referred to the Committee on Police. And at a meeting of the Council held on the 21st instant, the Chairman of the Committee on Police presented the following report: The Committee on Police, to whom was referred the petition of Wm. Taylor, John at Higgles and others, asking the Council to reinstate. Captain James B Pleasant to the office of Captain of the Night Watch, or that a poll be opened in each ward in order that the people may elect him, respectfully report.-- That the Charter does not provide for filling a vacancy in the office, of Captain of the Night Watch by an election. They also report that there are only 457 signatures to the petition, an
there saw--Capt Pleasant greatly excited, and using to Mr Seal, and handing him (Elits) his muscat, in a violent and angry manner, said to Mr Seal that he was then ready to matter with him, there or anywhere else, and that such was the conduct of Mr Pleasant, that be (Mr Ellis) there declared that he ought to be taken and carried in the watch house. In this opinion I fully court or with Mr Ellis, and it was the deity of every police officer present so to have done. I submit this conduct to pour honorable body to take such action upon it as you, in your judgment, deem proper. It give me no pleasure to make this report, but my official duty commands me to do it. I have the honer to be Very respectfully, Your obedient servant; Joseph Mayo, Mayor. It was then resolved by the Council, that James S Pleasant, Captain of the Night-watch, be removed from his office for misconduct as an officer on the Capitol Square, on the 11th day of May last. jy 25--2t
North Carolina"--in other words, the organ and pet newspaper of Beast Butler. A considerable portion of its space is devoted to the publication of proceedings of Courts Martial and Military Commissions, in which grave charges are alleged against officers in the Federal army: The first on the list is the case of Lieut Matthew Keck, Adjutant of the 188th Pennsylvania volunteers. The first charge against him was a violation of the 52d Article of War, in that he did, on or about the 16th day of May, at or near Drewry's Bluff, while with his regiment in front of the enemy, shamefully abandon his post at the first fire, and run back to the entrenchments, a distance of nine miles, more or less. It is also alleged that his cowardice was aggravated in character by his attempt to spread consternation wherever he went, and that he was guilty of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman. The Court Martial sentenced him to be drummed out of camp.--With the placard "coward" on his bac
June 26th (search for this): article 4
principles. From the evidence before us, we have but little doubt he would have been pleased to see the sear of Government of the State sacked and burned, if his own precious, "sweet scented" carcass could have been removed from danger. He had not the mealiness to help to defend the town, but now he is safe, he sneers at those who did. Begun, If you love rebels, go to Dizle, or to the embraces of some she devil of that ilk. Close of the Pittsburg Fair. [From the Pittsburg Chronicle, June 26] The Sanitary Fair closed on Saturday evening, under circumstances alike satisfactory to its originators and the public at large. Not since the Sanitary Fair movement commenced has there been an exhibition to compare at bill in its results with that of Pittsburg. New York with a population of nearly a million, and, as the great commercial centre of the nation, advantages possessed by no other city, raised but little over $1,000,000 while Pittsburg, with a population of 200,000,
July 11th (search for this): article 1
At a meeting of the Council held on the 11th day of July, a petites, signed by several hundred citizens of the city, was presented, asking that Mr. Pleasant be reinstated as Captain of the Night Watch, or that a poll be opened in each ward in order that the people may re-elect him. This petition was read and referred to the Committee on Police. And at a meeting of the Council held on the 21st instant, the Chairman of the Committee on Police presented the following report: The Committee on Police, to whom was referred the petition of Wm. Taylor, John at Higgles and others, asking the Council to reinstate. Captain James B Pleasant to the office of Captain of the Night Watch, or that a poll be opened in each ward in order that the people may elect him, respectfully report.-- That the Charter does not provide for filling a vacancy in the office, of Captain of the Night Watch by an election. They also report that there are only 457 signatures to the petition, an
July 16th (search for this): article 1
ard through the leaden rain, and drove the enemy in disorder from the works, capturing a number of prisoners." Among those lost on our side are Brig. Gen. Stevens, of Walker's division, and Major Preston, of the artillery, killed during the action. Judging from the tone of the Georgia papers, Atlanta is to be defended at every sacrifice. No official dispatches were received at headquarters last night. Movements in North Mississippi. A dispatch from Tupelo, dated July 16, says our forces had been fighting on the prairies since the previous Sunday. On Wednesday the enemy declined battle and moved toward Tupelo. We struck them in the flanks on every road, but rapid movements prevented concentration. On Thursday our troops attacked the enemy with three cavalry divisions at Old Harrisburg, but failed to drive them from their strong position. The enemy declined every invitation to fight. On Friday afternoon, our troops being well up and about to, bring th
July 20th (search for this): article 4
hose provisions he heartily approves, and is nowise inclined to violate. More than this he does not yet feel at liberty to state, though he soon may be. And all that he can now add is his general inference that the pacification of our country is neither so difficult nor so distant as seems to be generally supposed. The engagement at Snicker's Ferry. A correspondent of the New York Herald writes the following exaggerated account of the fight at Snicker's: Snicker's Ferry, July 20--The forces under Major Gen Wright have pursued Early and Breckin from Washington to this place, sometimes skirmishing with their rear guard, which proved to have been kept 24 hours in the rear of the main body for purposes of observation. It invariably fled when attacked. When near Purcellville, some miles south of Snicker's Gap, Duffie's cavalry, of Gen Crook's command, came upon their trains and captured 82 of their wagons with but slight loss. Up at the mouth of the Gap he had a mor
July 24th (search for this): article 2
A storm at Wilmington. Wilmington, July 24. --A storm seaward has been raging heavily all day up to eight o'clock to-night. The wind is from the northeast.
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