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nited States Minister in Pekin, against the admission of Confederate vessels to any Chinese port. The decree is, of course, not to the living of the British residents in China, and one of their organs threatens the Chinese with the wrath of President Davis. "The decree of Prince Kung" it says, Campunts to a casus belli, and if it should suit President Davis to make trouble about it he will have an excellent opportunity of doing so. If he selects to retaliate, there is no Power except the UnitePresident Davis to make trouble about it he will have an excellent opportunity of doing so. If he selects to retaliate, there is no Power except the United States that would care to interfere, and that power could do but little. Confederate cruisers might open communications with the Helpings, and with case sweep the present dy nasty from the throne. We know of nothing which could be more easily effected; and as, speaking with reference to the law of nations the Confederate States would have right on their side, unless Prince Kung should select to cat the leek, there would be little difficulty in creating such a complication as might produce m
Gen Crook (search for this): article 4
mishing with their rear guard, which proved to have been kept 24 hours in the rear of the main body for purposes of observation. It invariably fled when attacked. When near Purcellville, some miles south of Snicker's Gap, Duffie's cavalry, of Gen Crook's command, came upon their trains and captured 82 of their wagons with but slight loss. Up at the mouth of the Gap he had a more serious time, and lost a few men. Crook then brought up his cavalry, and, passing through the Gap, reached the ferCrook then brought up his cavalry, and, passing through the Gap, reached the ferry, which was so strongly protected that he could not cross. The next day Gen Wright came up with some of his troops, and soon determined to attempt a crossing, sufficiently at least to determine their strength. He did so, and, under cover of artillery fire, crossed over several regiments, which maintained their ground manfully for some time; but just as reinforcements were about to join them they came back, the right of the line being in some confusion. The whole Yankee loss is estimate
just as reinforcements were about to join them they came back, the right of the line being in some confusion. The whole Yankee loss is estimated at 300 men. Jacques and Kirk visit Richmond. The Washington correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer states, in reference to the visit of Jacques and Kirk to Richmond, that theJacques and Kirk to Richmond, that the report that they acted in an official capacity for the Federal Government, or that they were in any respect recognized either at Washington or in Richmond as agents, messengers, envoys, &c, of the United States, is untrue. The object of their mission was not present in its nature, but altogether ulterior and dependent upon contind no difficulty in entering the Confederate lines, and, in fact, every courtesy was kindly extended to them as they journeyed towards the capital. As soon as Colonel Jacques arrived in Richmond, he requested that he might be placed under guard, which was immediately done, although the entire freedom of the city was immediately ext
as the precise object of their mission, still it is understood that it looked to a restoration of peace, They reached Richmond by passing, with permission, through Grant's lines. They found no difficulty in entering the Confederate lines, and, in fact, every courtesy was kindly extended to them as they journeyed towards the capitad, he requested that he might be placed under guard, which was immediately done, although the entire freedom of the city was immediately extended to him. From Grant's army. The Washington correspondent of the New York Daily News, under date of the 20th, states that he has recent intelligence from Grant's army, some of whicGrant's army, some of which it is, perhaps, he adds, improper to publish at present. He discredits the stories of the recapture of wagons and horses from our forces in their retreat from Maryland--The plunder, he states, was out of reach of pursuit long ago. The negro must do the fighting. [From the Baltimore American] It has been suggested — very
lined to violate. More than this he does not yet feel at liberty to state, though he soon may be. And all that he can now add is his general inference that the pacification of our country is neither so difficult nor so distant as seems to be generally supposed. The engagement at Snicker's Ferry. A correspondent of the New York Herald writes the following exaggerated account of the fight at Snicker's: Snicker's Ferry, July 20--The forces under Major Gen Wright have pursued Early and Breckin from Washington to this place, sometimes skirmishing with their rear guard, which proved to have been kept 24 hours in the rear of the main body for purposes of observation. It invariably fled when attacked. When near Purcellville, some miles south of Snicker's Gap, Duffie's cavalry, of Gen Crook's command, came upon their trains and captured 82 of their wagons with but slight loss. Up at the mouth of the Gap he had a more serious time, and lost a few men. Crook then brought
July 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
ry, and Infantry, $18; Chief Buglers of Cavalry, $23; Buglers, $16; Farriers and Blacksmiths of Cavalry, and Artificers of Artillery, $18; Principal Musicians of Artillery and Infantry, $22; Leaders of Brigade and Regimental Bande, $75; Musicians, $16; Hospital Stewards of the first class, $33; Hospital Stewards of the second class, $25; Hospital Stewards of the third class, $23. All non commissioned officers and privates in the regular army, serving under enlistments made prior to July 22d, 1861, shall have the privilege of re- enlisting for a term of three years in their respective organizations, until the 1st of August next, and all such non-commissioned officers and privates so re-enlisting, shall, be entitled to the bounty mentioned in the joint resolution of Congress approved January 3, 1864. In all cases where the Government shall furnish transportation and subsistence to discharged officers and soldiers, from the place of their discharge to the place of enrollment or
January 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 4
Artificers of Artillery, $18; Principal Musicians of Artillery and Infantry, $22; Leaders of Brigade and Regimental Bande, $75; Musicians, $16; Hospital Stewards of the first class, $33; Hospital Stewards of the second class, $25; Hospital Stewards of the third class, $23. All non commissioned officers and privates in the regular army, serving under enlistments made prior to July 22d, 1861, shall have the privilege of re- enlisting for a term of three years in their respective organizations, until the 1st of August next, and all such non-commissioned officers and privates so re-enlisting, shall, be entitled to the bounty mentioned in the joint resolution of Congress approved January 3, 1864. In all cases where the Government shall furnish transportation and subsistence to discharged officers and soldiers, from the place of their discharge to the place of enrollment or original muster into the service, they shall not be entitled to travel pay or commutation of subsistence.
June 26th (search for this): article 4
principles. From the evidence before us, we have but little doubt he would have been pleased to see the sear of Government of the State sacked and burned, if his own precious, "sweet scented" carcass could have been removed from danger. He had not the mealiness to help to defend the town, but now he is safe, he sneers at those who did. Begun, If you love rebels, go to Dizle, or to the embraces of some she devil of that ilk. Close of the Pittsburg Fair. [From the Pittsburg Chronicle, June 26] The Sanitary Fair closed on Saturday evening, under circumstances alike satisfactory to its originators and the public at large. Not since the Sanitary Fair movement commenced has there been an exhibition to compare at bill in its results with that of Pittsburg. New York with a population of nearly a million, and, as the great commercial centre of the nation, advantages possessed by no other city, raised but little over $1,000,000 while Pittsburg, with a population of 200,000,
January, 5 AD (search for this): article 4
ily effected; and as, speaking with reference to the law of nations the Confederate States would have right on their side, unless Prince Kung should select to cat the leek, there would be little difficulty in creating such a complication as might produce most important, perhaps disaster us results." Increase of pay in the Yankee army. The President has signed and approved the act to increase the pay of the soldiers in the United States army. It provides that on and after the 1st day of May last, and during the continuance of the present rebellion, the pay per month of noncommissioned officers and privates in the military service shall be as follows: Sergeant Majors, $26, Quartermasters and Commissary Sergeants of Cavalry, Artillery, and Infantry, $29; Sergeants of Ordnance, Sappers and Miners, and Pontoniers, $34; Corporate of Ordnance, Sappers and Miners, and Pontoniers, $20; Privates of Engineers and Ordnance, of the first class, $18, and of the second class, $6; Corp
January, 8 AD (search for this): article 4
Artificers of Artillery, $18; Principal Musicians of Artillery and Infantry, $22; Leaders of Brigade and Regimental Bande, $75; Musicians, $16; Hospital Stewards of the first class, $33; Hospital Stewards of the second class, $25; Hospital Stewards of the third class, $23. All non commissioned officers and privates in the regular army, serving under enlistments made prior to July 22d, 1861, shall have the privilege of re- enlisting for a term of three years in their respective organizations, until the 1st of August next, and all such non-commissioned officers and privates so re-enlisting, shall, be entitled to the bounty mentioned in the joint resolution of Congress approved January 3, 1864. In all cases where the Government shall furnish transportation and subsistence to discharged officers and soldiers, from the place of their discharge to the place of enrollment or original muster into the service, they shall not be entitled to travel pay or commutation of subsistence.
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