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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Oregon Hill (New York, United States) (search for this): article 8
charged with stealing a purse containing $9 in specie and $42 in Confederate money from Mrs. Mary Wade. The plaintiff stated that in her absence from home, on Sunday morning last, the accused entered her house and abstracted the purse and its contents. A warrant was gotten out and placed in the hands of Lieut. Baptist, of the night police, for execution, whereupon that officer went in search of Marshall, but did not find him until Tuesday night, when he was overhauled in a ball-room on Oregon Hill. Baptist was not very mealy mouthed about making known his business, but as soon as he got his eye on the game he clamped him by the collar, and in the presence of the gay party assembled made known his business. This disconcerted the accused, and for a while he manifested considerable consternation; but he afterwards recovered his composure and forthwith made a clean breast of the matter by acknowledging that he stole the money, and surrendering the pocket-book with a portion of the sp
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 8
m. The absence of important testimony induced the Mayor to adjourn the matter over till this morning, and the accused was thereupon admitted to bail in the sum of $3,000 for his appearance. H. J. Klinck, a special detective in the War Department, was charged with feloniously obtaining a diamond finger ring, valued at $2,000, from a cyprian named Abbey Howard, sojourning at Josephine Demerrit's, on 10th street. Miss Howard testified that about three years since she bought the ring in Memphis, Tenn. Through her permission Klinck had worn it till very recently, when, on his demanding of her the return of a breastpin which she was wearing belonging to him, she required him to surrender up the ring, which he did, but subsequently he called upon her and forcibly took it from her finger. Klinck contended that the money with which the ring was purchased was furnished by him, and that Miss Howard had only been wearing it because he loaned it to her in compliance with her request. Witness
Confederate money from Mrs. Mary Wade. The plaintiff stated that in her absence from home, on Sunday morning last, the accused entered her house and abstracted the purse and its contents. A warrant was gotten out and placed in the hands of Lieut. Baptist, of the night police, for execution, whereupon that officer went in search of Marshall, but did not find him until Tuesday night, when he was overhauled in a ball-room on Oregon Hill. Baptist was not very mealy mouthed about making known hisBaptist was not very mealy mouthed about making known his business, but as soon as he got his eye on the game he clamped him by the collar, and in the presence of the gay party assembled made known his business. This disconcerted the accused, and for a while he manifested considerable consternation; but he afterwards recovered his composure and forthwith made a clean breast of the matter by acknowledging that he stole the money, and surrendering the pocket-book with a portion of the specie and bank notes which were in it when it was taken. The Mayo
Joe Harris (search for this): article 8
struck out for liberty. At first she indulged in violent physical persuasion; but finding the bolts and bars of her prison shade too strong for her, she resorted to the bribing process, (which has hitherto worked such wonders in covering over crime,) and shook at the officers a bag of "shiners" which she had in her pocket. All her efforts proved unavailing, however, and the consequence was a night's sojourn in the station house and her appearance before His Honor yesterday morning. Joe Harris was charged with burglariously entering the dwelling house of some person unknown and stealing a lot of flour. In the absence of witnesses for the Commonwealth, the case was continued till this morning. John Camp, a very bad while boy, charged with stealing $10 in the First Market from Geo. Thraves, was committed for want of security for his future good behavior. Ella, slave of Richard James, charged with stealing meat in the Second Market, was ordered to be whipped. Geo W
George Thraves (search for this): article 8
bag of "shiners" which she had in her pocket. All her efforts proved unavailing, however, and the consequence was a night's sojourn in the station house and her appearance before His Honor yesterday morning. Joe Harris was charged with burglariously entering the dwelling house of some person unknown and stealing a lot of flour. In the absence of witnesses for the Commonwealth, the case was continued till this morning. John Camp, a very bad while boy, charged with stealing $10 in the First Market from Geo. Thraves, was committed for want of security for his future good behavior. Ella, slave of Richard James, charged with stealing meat in the Second Market, was ordered to be whipped. Geo W Bens, charged with meal in the Second Market to sell again, was fined $20. Mary was charged with possession of a house to which Amelia Cofield was entitled, but the Mayor deemed the pass one over which he had no control, and therefore discharged the party accused.
eded to his room, with the intention, as they supposed, of shooting him.--At the conclusion of this testimony the Mayor discharged Klinck, and deeming the ring his property turned it over to him. Mrs Mary Debell, charged with using threatening and abusive language towards Isabella Straunb, throwing some of her furniture into the yard, and spitting in her face, was required to give security in the sum of $300 for her future good behavior. Mrs Dehell was excessively belligerent when officers Jenkins and Davis went to serve the warrant for her arrest. She put at the former with a broomstick and act her dog on the latter, which for awhile made the contest a very warm one; but finally assistance came to the relief of the police and she was borne off in triumph to the upper station house, where she again struck out for liberty. At first she indulged in violent physical persuasion; but finding the bolts and bars of her prison shade too strong for her, she resorted to the bribing proce
Isabella Straunb (search for this): article 8
her in compliance with her request. Witnesses were called, who testified that the plaintiff had recently been very abusive towards the accused, and that a day or two since she armed herself with a pistol and proceeded to his room, with the intention, as they supposed, of shooting him.--At the conclusion of this testimony the Mayor discharged Klinck, and deeming the ring his property turned it over to him. Mrs Mary Debell, charged with using threatening and abusive language towards Isabella Straunb, throwing some of her furniture into the yard, and spitting in her face, was required to give security in the sum of $300 for her future good behavior. Mrs Dehell was excessively belligerent when officers Jenkins and Davis went to serve the warrant for her arrest. She put at the former with a broomstick and act her dog on the latter, which for awhile made the contest a very warm one; but finally assistance came to the relief of the police and she was borne off in triumph to the upper
Abbey Howard (search for this): article 8
H. J. Klinck, a special detective in the War Department, was charged with feloniously obtaining a diamond finger ring, valued at $2,000, from a cyprian named Abbey Howard, sojourning at Josephine Demerrit's, on 10th street. Miss Howard testified that about three years since she bought the ring in Memphis, Tenn. Through her permiMiss Howard testified that about three years since she bought the ring in Memphis, Tenn. Through her permission Klinck had worn it till very recently, when, on his demanding of her the return of a breastpin which she was wearing belonging to him, she required him to surrender up the ring, which he did, but subsequently he called upon her and forcibly took it from her finger. Klinck contended that the money with which the ring was purchased was furnished by him, and that Miss Howard had only been wearing it because he loaned it to her in compliance with her request. Witnesses were called, who testified that the plaintiff had recently been very abusive towards the accused, and that a day or two since she armed herself with a pistol and proceeded to his room, wit
Amelia Cofield (search for this): article 8
bag of "shiners" which she had in her pocket. All her efforts proved unavailing, however, and the consequence was a night's sojourn in the station house and her appearance before His Honor yesterday morning. Joe Harris was charged with burglariously entering the dwelling house of some person unknown and stealing a lot of flour. In the absence of witnesses for the Commonwealth, the case was continued till this morning. John Camp, a very bad while boy, charged with stealing $10 in the First Market from Geo. Thraves, was committed for want of security for his future good behavior. Ella, slave of Richard James, charged with stealing meat in the Second Market, was ordered to be whipped. Geo W Bens, charged with meal in the Second Market to sell again, was fined $20. Mary was charged with possession of a house to which Amelia Cofield was entitled, but the Mayor deemed the pass one over which he had no control, and therefore discharged the party accused.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 8
, with the intention, as they supposed, of shooting him.--At the conclusion of this testimony the Mayor discharged Klinck, and deeming the ring his property turned it over to him. Mrs Mary Debell, charged with using threatening and abusive language towards Isabella Straunb, throwing some of her furniture into the yard, and spitting in her face, was required to give security in the sum of $300 for her future good behavior. Mrs Dehell was excessively belligerent when officers Jenkins and Davis went to serve the warrant for her arrest. She put at the former with a broomstick and act her dog on the latter, which for awhile made the contest a very warm one; but finally assistance came to the relief of the police and she was borne off in triumph to the upper station house, where she again struck out for liberty. At first she indulged in violent physical persuasion; but finding the bolts and bars of her prison shade too strong for her, she resorted to the bribing process, (which has
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