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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 8
n untrodden by Federal troops. After destroying the road and bridges alluded to, Rousseau was to endeavor to join Gen. Sherman on the Chattahoochee river. The expedition thus undertaken is a bold one, and is fraught with difficulties. We are not, therefore, surprised to learn that the officers attached to the expedition left Nashville with the idea that they might become inmates of a Southern prison, and very prudently arranged their affairs accordingly. Confederate raid into Western Kentucky. The Evansville (lud) Journal, of the 21st, says a courier arrived there Thursday from Henderson, Ky., advising the military authorities that Henderson was attacked by rebels, from 150 to 700 strong, and fighting was going on. Our gunboats immediately left for Henderson. The Union troops which went to Henderson on Wednesday to shoot two guerilla prisoners, in retaliation for the murder of a Union man in Henderson, occasioned this rebel raid. Certain distinguished citizens made
Hornady (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 8
op its object. The account given above may be somewhat exaggerated by those persons who have retreated to this city from the threat ened district; yet the main points are partially confirmed by reports received by military officers, though not of an official character. In the meantime reinforcements are being forwarded, and there is no feeling of insecurity apparent in military circles. The Rousseau raid. Gen. Rousseau, in command of 2,700 Federal cavalry, started for Decatur, Ala., on the 10th inst, on a raid, the object of which was to destroy the bridges and break up the railroad connecting Columbus, Ga., with Montgomery, Ala. The distance to be travelled cannot be much less than a hundred miles, and the line of the routs is one which has heretofore been untrodden by Federal troops. After destroying the road and bridges alluded to, Rousseau was to endeavor to join Gen. Sherman on the Chattahoochee river. The expedition thus undertaken is a bold one, and is
Henderson, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 8
ir affairs accordingly. Confederate raid into Western Kentucky. The Evansville (lud) Journal, of the 21st, says a courier arrived there Thursday from Henderson, Ky., advising the military authorities that Henderson was attacked by rebels, from 150 to 700 strong, and fighting was going on. Our gunboats immediately left for Henderson. The Union troops which went to Henderson on Wednesday to shoot two guerilla prisoners, in retaliation for the murder of a Union man in Henderson, occasioned this rebel raid. Certain distinguished citizens made great efforts to prevent the execution. Gen Ewing postponed it. The citizens of Henderson left the placeHenderson left the place in large numbers before the attack began. Persons who left later report the guerillas in the city, and the Union troops in line of battle awaiting the attack. The timely arrival of the gunboats would save the Union troops from disaster. The gunboats were shelling the woods at last accounts. There was much excitement at Lou
Hopkinsville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 8
ng was going on. Our gunboats immediately left for Henderson. The Union troops which went to Henderson on Wednesday to shoot two guerilla prisoners, in retaliation for the murder of a Union man in Henderson, occasioned this rebel raid. Certain distinguished citizens made great efforts to prevent the execution. Gen Ewing postponed it. The citizens of Henderson left the place in large numbers before the attack began. Persons who left later report the guerillas in the city, and the Union troops in line of battle awaiting the attack. The timely arrival of the gunboats would save the Union troops from disaster. The gunboats were shelling the woods at last accounts. There was much excitement at Louisville, and horses were being impressed for the emergency by the Yankee authorities. A rumor was also afloat that the Confederates had whipped the Federals at Hopkinsville, and had also turned up in Carrol county, and captured the home guard and two 6 pounder brass pieces there.
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 8
threat ened district; yet the main points are partially confirmed by reports received by military officers, though not of an official character. In the meantime reinforcements are being forwarded, and there is no feeling of insecurity apparent in military circles. The Rousseau raid. Gen. Rousseau, in command of 2,700 Federal cavalry, started for Decatur, Ala., on the 10th inst, on a raid, the object of which was to destroy the bridges and break up the railroad connecting Columbus, Ga., with Montgomery, Ala. The distance to be travelled cannot be much less than a hundred miles, and the line of the routs is one which has heretofore been untrodden by Federal troops. After destroying the road and bridges alluded to, Rousseau was to endeavor to join Gen. Sherman on the Chattahoochee river. The expedition thus undertaken is a bold one, and is fraught with difficulties. We are not, therefore, surprised to learn that the officers attached to the expedition left Nashvill
Evansville (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 8
troops. After destroying the road and bridges alluded to, Rousseau was to endeavor to join Gen. Sherman on the Chattahoochee river. The expedition thus undertaken is a bold one, and is fraught with difficulties. We are not, therefore, surprised to learn that the officers attached to the expedition left Nashville with the idea that they might become inmates of a Southern prison, and very prudently arranged their affairs accordingly. Confederate raid into Western Kentucky. The Evansville (lud) Journal, of the 21st, says a courier arrived there Thursday from Henderson, Ky., advising the military authorities that Henderson was attacked by rebels, from 150 to 700 strong, and fighting was going on. Our gunboats immediately left for Henderson. The Union troops which went to Henderson on Wednesday to shoot two guerilla prisoners, in retaliation for the murder of a Union man in Henderson, occasioned this rebel raid. Certain distinguished citizens made great efforts to preve
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
and hurling it upon him succeeded in capturing all his artillery besides a portion of his cavalry. Gen Averill is reported to have been killed, and acting Brig Gen Mulligan was seen to fall from his horse and is believed to have been killed. No other losses of Yankee officers are reported. The forces of Gen Hunter, who was not himself present in the engagement, are said to have been greatly outnumbered by the enemy. Late last evening there was no telegraphic communication beyond Harper's Ferry, as the enemy had out the wires. The character of this movement of the Confederates is not yet ascertained, and opinions greatly differ as to its object and importance; some contending that it is simply a return of the party recently in Maryland, who, taking advantage of the division of Gen Hunter's forces to punish very severely a portion of them, while others think it is a movement in force into Maryland, with a view of attacking Washington. A few days, however, will probably deve
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 8
erry, as the enemy had out the wires. The character of this movement of the Confederates is not yet ascertained, and opinions greatly differ as to its object and importance; some contending that it is simply a return of the party recently in Maryland, who, taking advantage of the division of Gen Hunter's forces to punish very severely a portion of them, while others think it is a movement in force into Maryland, with a view of attacking Washington. A few days, however, will probably developMaryland, with a view of attacking Washington. A few days, however, will probably develop its object. The account given above may be somewhat exaggerated by those persons who have retreated to this city from the threat ened district; yet the main points are partially confirmed by reports received by military officers, though not of an official character. In the meantime reinforcements are being forwarded, and there is no feeling of insecurity apparent in military circles. The Rousseau raid. Gen. Rousseau, in command of 2,700 Federal cavalry, started for Decatur,
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 8
n. Rousseau, in command of 2,700 Federal cavalry, started for Decatur, Ala., on the 10th inst, on a raid, the object of which was to destroy the bridges and break up the railroad connecting Columbus, Ga., with Montgomery, Ala. The distance to be travelled cannot be much less than a hundred miles, and the line of the routs is one which has heretofore been untrodden by Federal troops. After destroying the road and bridges alluded to, Rousseau was to endeavor to join Gen. Sherman on the Chattahoochee river. The expedition thus undertaken is a bold one, and is fraught with difficulties. We are not, therefore, surprised to learn that the officers attached to the expedition left Nashville with the idea that they might become inmates of a Southern prison, and very prudently arranged their affairs accordingly. Confederate raid into Western Kentucky. The Evansville (lud) Journal, of the 21st, says a courier arrived there Thursday from Henderson, Ky., advising the military author
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
e Yankees in the Valley. Speaking of the Yankee defeat in the Valley, the Baltimore Gazette says the Yankees under Crook, Averill, Mulligan and Kelly were not pursuing the "rebel raiders" when they met with their reverse, but had discontinued the pursuit. They were near Winchester on Sunday morning when Gen Ewell (?) pounced on them with an overwhelming force. it says: No details have been received of the fight of Sunday, further than those given by parties from the vicinity of Martinsburg, which are to the effect that the Confederates massed a large force in front of Gen Averill, and hurling it upon him succeeded in capturing all his artillery besides a portion of his cavalry. Gen Averill is reported to have been killed, and acting Brig Gen Mulligan was seen to fall from his horse and is believed to have been killed. No other losses of Yankee officers are reported. The forces of Gen Hunter, who was not himself present in the engagement, are said to have been greatly out
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