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Giovanni Falstaff (search for this): article 12
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack? The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sac
Jack Falstaff (search for this): article 12
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack?
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack?
Shakespeare (search for this): article 12
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack?
Merry Wives (search for this): article 12
The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sack? The Merry Wives in Italian. --The translation of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives" into the Italian libretto of Nicolai's opera involves some very amusing lingual oddities. Nothing seems less adapted to the soft Italian tongue than the vigorous, coarse English of this play. Thus Jack Falstaff is translated into Sir Giovanni Falstaff; the "Merry Wives" are le mogli scherzanti; and Falstaff's cry for "sack" is rendered ola da ber portato — dov'e l mio sac