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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 16 total hits in 5 results.

Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 4
Life in Atlanta. --A letter from Atlanta, dated the 12th instant, published in the Macon (Ga.) Intelligencer, gives the following horrible occurrence there: On the night of the 12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was found dead in her bed. No one knew at what hour of the night she returned home from the ball. When she was found it was discovered that her throat was perfectly black where she had been choked; her arms were bruised, and her body terribly mutilated; her clothing was torn and muddy, as though she had been dragged through the mud by some villain who had violated her person. Mrs. Collins occupied a high position in the first circles of this city at the time of her death, and was respected and bel
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 4
Life in Atlanta. --A letter from Atlanta, dated the 12th instant, published in the Macon (Ga.) Intelligencer, gives the following horrible occurrence there: On the night of the 12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was Atlanta, dated the 12th instant, published in the Macon (Ga.) Intelligencer, gives the following horrible occurrence there: On the night of the 12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was found dead in her bed. No one knew at what hour of the night she returned home from the ball. When she was found it was discovered that her throat was perfectly black where she had been choked; her arms were bruised, and her body terribly mutilated; her clothing was torn and muddy, as though she had been dragged through the mud by some villain who had violated her person. Mrs. Collins occupied a high position in the first circles of this city at the time of her death, and was respected and be
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
Life in Atlanta. --A letter from Atlanta, dated the 12th instant, published in the Macon (Ga.) Intelligencer, gives the following horrible occurrence there: On the night of the 12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was found dead in her bed. No one knew at what hour of the night she returned home from the ball. When she was found it was discovered that her throat was perfectly black where she had been choked; her arms were bruised, and her body terribly mutilated; her clothing was torn and muddy, as though she had been dragged through the mud by some villain who had violated her person. Mrs. Collins occupied a high position in the first circles of this city at the time of her death, and was respected and belo
Sarah Collins (search for this): article 4
Life in Atlanta. --A letter from Atlanta, dated the 12th instant, published in the Macon (Ga.) Intelligencer, gives the following horrible occurrence there: On the night of the 12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was fhat her throat was perfectly black where she had been choked; her arms were bruised, and her body terribly mutilated; her clothing was torn and muddy, as though she had been dragged through the mud by some villain who had violated her person. Mrs. Collins occupied a high position in the first circles of this city at the time of her death, and was respected and beloved by all who knew her. An inquest was held over her remains, and the jury brought in a verdict that she came to her death at the h
Life in Atlanta. --A letter from Atlanta, dated the 12th instant, published in the Macon (Ga.) Intelligencer, gives the following horrible occurrence there: On the night of the 12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was f12th instant, a widow lady, by the name of Mrs. Sarah Collins, a refugee from Memphis, Tennessee, was invited to attend a ball which was to be given at the Medical College that evening. She attended the ball, not suspecting but what all was right and proper. Some time during the following day this lady was found dead in her bed. No one knew at what hour of the night she returned home from the ball. When she was found it was discovered that her throat was perfectly black where she had been choked; her arms were bruised, and her body terribly mutilated; her clothing was torn and muddy, as though she had been dragged through the mud by some villain who had violated her person. Mrs. Collins occupied a high position in the first circles of this city at the time of her death, and was respected and belo