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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
ow as an expose of the state of affairs in the United States: The Siege of Atlanta. Northern press telegrams speak of the demonstration of Sherman against the Macon and Atlanta road, and the massing of his forces southwest of Atlanta, "in the rear of Hood's forces, " as they are pleased to style the position. The CincinAtlanta, "in the rear of Hood's forces, " as they are pleased to style the position. The Cincinnati Gazette has a long gassing letter from Sherman's army, dated August 19th. The writer says: If the rebels should conclude to resign their cherished city (Atlanta) to the Federal troops, the opinion prevails that it will be only to make a more desperate and decided stand at the village of Eastport, six miles south of formidable works, both military and artificial, (!) are located. The city of Atlanta, merely, is clearly of little importance in the eyes of the commanding general of the most simple movements known to military men. But Sherman does not want Atlanta unless he can also receive Hood's whole army within his lines as prisoners of
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 5
stration of Sherman against the Macon and Atlanta road, and the massing of his forces southwest of Atlanta, "in the rear of Hood's forces, " as they are pleased to style the position. The Cincinnati Gazette has a long gassing letter from Sherman's army, dated August 19th. The writer says: If the rebels should conclude to resign their cherished city (Atlanta) to the Federal troops, the opinion prevails that it will be only to make a more desperate and decided stand at the village of Eastport, six miles south of their present location. At this place the junction is formed of the Macon and Montgomery railroads, and it is supposed much more formidable works, both military and artificial, (!) are located. The city of Atlanta, merely, is clearly of little importance in the eyes of the commanding general as a desirable military position. --Had his object been solely to take that place, the matter would have been concluded long ago, for there has not been a day in the past four week
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 5
ke place next Monday; the Yankee authorities have become aware that a formidable secret organization, pervading all the States, is in existence, the object of which is to resist the enforcement of the draft and defeat its purposes. How very formidable this organization is believed to be, may be gathered from the telegram relative to the orders of General Heintzelman, commanding the "Northern Department," (prohibiting any forwarding companies from delivering arms or powder in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois or Michigan for the next sixty days;) the speech of Governor Morton, of Indiana, and the proclamation of Governor Brough, of Ohio. Governor Morton made an address in Indianapolis, August 22d, in which he discussed at length the recent development regarding the alleged conspiracy and the finding of arms, ammunition, &c. He says: For eighteen months past the people of Indiana have been told repeatedly that immense quantities of arms and ammunition have been coming into the State for th
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 5
the past four weeks when our army could not have occupied it by one of the most simple movements known to military men. But Sherman does not want Atlanta unless he can also receive Hood's whole army within his lines as prisoners of war. * * * * * * * A few more days must be passed just as the past few days have been spent, and the rebels in our front will be rebels only in name. * * * * * * * The Defences of Mobile. The Northern press have advices from their fleet in Mobile bay to the 21st ultimo. A communication, dated "Blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 16, " says: Naval reconnaissances towards Mobile found formidable, but not insurmountable, obstructions. Besides batteries, rams and sunken vessels, there are very strong casemates, mounting ten guns. In all the spaces between batteries and vessels, and on both shores, piles are driven, the tops of which are sawed off just below the surface of the water, and have heavy iron bolts in them, sharpened
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
nd peace. Lincoln walks very calmly on to destruction. His draft for more men commences on Monday next, and in the Northwestern States there is a preparation and determination to resist it to the death, and yet we find in the New York Times the following dispatch, dated Washington, the 25th: You may rest assured that all the reports attributing to the Government any movements looking toward negotiations for peace at present are utterly without foundation. There has been nobody at Niagara representing the Government, or in any way expressing its opinions, concerned in any negotiations or conversations with the rebel emissaries on the subject of peace. The Government has not entertained or discussed the project of proposing an armistice with the rebels; nor has it any intention of sending commissioners to Richmond for the purpose of offering or soliciting terms of peace, or of negotiating with the rebel authorities on that or any other subject. Its sole and undivided purpos
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
en — holding some of our captured guns with their skirmish lines. They must have suffered heavily. "My own loss, including cavalry, will, perhaps, not exceed twelve or fifteen hundred, though this is surmise. "The command is not yet organized. Captain Brownson, of my staff, was wounded severely during the night. Colonel Walker, Assistant Adjutant General, is missing. "This is acknowledged to have been one of the most desperate and determined fights of the war, resembling Spotsylvania in its character, though the number engaged gives it less importance. "A few more good troops would have given us a victory of considerable importance. "I forward this afternoon prisoners from the field of Wilcox's and Hebb's commands. "Major Angel, of my staff, saw and conversed with two prisoners of Mayline's division last night. I do not find them this morning. They say that Mayline's division, with the exception of one brigade, was there. "[Signed] W. L. Hancock."
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
m our latest Northern files the following summary of intelligence. It will be found extremely interesting just now as an expose of the state of affairs in the United States: The Siege of Atlanta. Northern press telegrams speak of the demonstration of Sherman against the Macon and Atlanta road, and the massing of his forcesfor the avowed purpose of resisting the State and Federal authorities. This has been well known to me during that time, and likewise to the authorities of the United States; but because until now the people have not happened to see with their own eyes the visible evidence of the truth of these things, it has not heretofore made a ry penalties you are incurring. He then cites to them all the pains and penalties ordained by Congress to follow any resistance to the "Government of the United States," which it is likely the people of Ohio will count as light afflictions, and but for a moment, as compared with the terrible alternative of being sent South to
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 5
n and desolation over some localities of the State; you may give aid and comfort for a season to the rebels already in arms against the country; you may transfer for a brief time the horrors of war from the fields of the South to these of the State of Ohio; you may paralyze prosperity and create consternation and alarm among our people. This is a bare possibility; but it is all you can hope to accomplish; for you have looked upon the progress of our present struggle to little purpose if you haower and the deep earnestness of the country in this contest. The final result will not be doubtful; the disaster to you will be complete, and the penalty will equal the enormity of the crime. From the commencement of this rebellion the State of Ohio has maintained a firm and inflexible position, which cannot now be abandoned. In this internal danger that now threatens us, I call upon all good citizens to assert and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and the Laws of the Land. Th
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
the enforcement of the draft and defeat its purposes. How very formidable this organization is believed to be, may be gathered from the telegram relative to the orders of General Heintzelman, commanding the "Northern Department," (prohibiting any forwarding companies from delivering arms or powder in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois or Michigan for the next sixty days;) the speech of Governor Morton, of Indiana, and the proclamation of Governor Brough, of Ohio. Governor Morton made an address in Indianapolis, August 22d, in which he discussed at length the recent development regarding the alleged conspiracy and the finding of arms, ammunition, &c. He says: For eighteen months past the people of Indiana have been told repeatedly that immense quantities of arms and ammunition have been coming into the State for the avowed purpose of resisting the State and Federal authorities. This has been well known to me during that time, and likewise to the authorities of the United States; but becau
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
d by the rebellion; either directly from the Confederate authorities or by their authorized agents in New York.--For myself, I entertain no doubt upon that subject. It is utterly impossible that the large amount of money required for the purchase of these large quantities of arms and ammunition could have been raised in the ordinary way of contributions. I happened to know something of the difficulty in the way of raising twenty, fifty or a hundred thousand dollars in that way. In the city of New York there are hundreds and thousands of men who have been compelled to leave the rebel States, and who have both the means and the disposition to aid the rebellion in this way. In addition to these, there are also there a large number of resident capitalists who have sympathized with the rebellion from the very first. Their trade was in the South at the breaking out of the war; their financial interests have been in the South from the very first, and they have doubtless contributed liberal
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