hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 66 0 Browse Search
Sherman 44 2 Browse Search
S. N. Davis 42 2 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 32 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 28 4 Browse Search
United States (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Grant 17 7 Browse Search
Indiana (Indiana, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
East Point (Georgia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,174 total hits in 458 results.

... 41 42 43 44 45 46
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): article 2
regular Friday letter, otherwise he might have been a translator or a small author. He has been fifteen years in Paris, has plain lodgings in the Lorette Quarter, and may be seen at the American Consul's two or three times a week. He is a friend of Dana, the former big gun of the Tribune, and knows nothing to speak of about America. "Edward G. Bunn, of California," as he writes himself once a day in all the visitors' books at all the banking houses, was formerly a writer upon the Alta San Francisco. He lives in the Rue St. Benefit, Latin Quarter, and is a consequential person of equal impudence and cowardice. You can see his letters any week in the Herald. They are apocryphal revelations of what he saw in a turn round his own imagination. Nobody who knows either Buffin or Paris has any confidence in what he says. He may be seen eavesdropping at the Grand Hotel by day and by night, and his literary abilities would not entitle him to keep a long-book upon a Schuylkill canal boat.
Huntingdon, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 2
are poor in pocket and distressed in sentiment. I cannot tell you anything better than of some of those who keep you posted in foreign news. The American newspaper correspondents best know here are Johnson and Mortimer, of the New York Times; Huntingdon, of the Tribune; and Buffing, of the Herald. Johnson, the Malakoff of the Times, has a reputation in America beyond his deserts. He is an Ohio man, and graduated a Doctor of Medicine in Paris. I should take him to be thirty-eight or forty yea in three- ture, by what gift of second sight does he learn the domestic relations of the Hapsburg family, or pick up the unpublished sayings of King Frederick William or Victor Emanuel? In close application, correctness and completeness, Huntingdon is the best correspondent in Europe. He is a dry, secretive, unsocial man, a sleeper over metaphysical treatises — a disciple of all new ideas. His judgment in international affairs is not better than other people's. He gives his opinion. He
Interview of a Canadian editor with the President. --The editor of the London (Canada) Free Press, writing from Washington to his paper, has describes an interview with Mr. Lincoln: The President's private room is just over the reception room, and is entered from a sort of square hall, about which there are many waiting rooms for persons seeking audiences with the President. Upon entering this room, I saw persons walking to and fro in waiting. I at once placed in the hands of a messenger my card and letters (previously procured from friends in New York and Cincinnati), to deliver to the President, and, with scarcely a moment's delay, I was tethered into his presence, when he arose and stepped forward in a stooping position, extended his hand and shook mine kindly, but rather loosely, as if he was afraid of hurting it, remarking, at the same time "I am glad to see you, sir; be seated." I replied: "I am a stranger in the capital, and have sought an interview with you, Mr.
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 3
Interview of a Canadian editor with the President. --The editor of the London (Canada) Free Press, writing from Washington to his paper, has describes an interview with Mr. Lincoln: The President's private room is just over the reception room, and is entered from a sort of square hall, about which there are many waiting rooms for persons seeking audiences with the President. Upon entering this room, I saw persons walking to and fro in waiting. I at once placed in the hands of a messenger my card and letters (previously procured from friends in New York and Cincinnati), to deliver to the President, and, with scarcely a moment's delay, I was tethered into his presence, when he arose and stepped forward in a stooping position, extended his hand and shook mine kindly, but rather loosely, as if he was afraid of hurting it, remarking, at the same time "I am glad to see you, sir; be seated." I replied: "I am a stranger in the capital, and have sought an interview with you, Mr. P
It is rumored that a company of ladies have tendered their services to Governor Clark as a bodyguard for those members of the Legislature who voted to put their grandfather's in the service, but who did not feel constitutionally constituted to face the music themselves. --Mississippian.
The Mary Bows, a blockade-running steamer, was totally wrecked running into Charleston on the 1st instant.
Colonel Thompson B. Lamer, of Florida, who was wounded in the battle of the Weldon railroad, died on the 1st instant.
Thompson B. Lamer (search for this): article 6
Colonel Thompson B. Lamer, of Florida, who was wounded in the battle of the Weldon railroad, died on the 1st instant.
... 41 42 43 44 45 46