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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 1, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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McClellan (search for this): article 7
the news relates to the Chicago Convention; Lincoln and his pulley have received a heavy check — that convention chose McClellan — the man whom Lincoln endeavored to keep down — the man most able to repair his errors and arrest the ruin plainly impdvises, should fail in effecting, as assured they will, the reconstruction of the Union. The London Post says General McClellan has of ways been distinguished by extreme moderation.-- If installed, unfettered by pledges, there is no reason to compromise before their military strength is entirely broken. In this view, they would be more inclined to treat with McClellan than Lincoln. But the Northern people will see less cause for change when Lincoln's administration brings success. movements in the field, the proceedings of the Chicago Convention are of much less importance than otherwise might be. McClellan's platform is friendly to the Union, with efforts for its pacific re-establishment. In point of fidelity, the Democrat<
bloody — the victories trifling and indecisive. The most important part of the news relates to the Chicago Convention; Lincoln and his pulley have received a heavy check — that convention chose McClellan — the man whom Lincoln endeavored to keep dLincoln endeavored to keep down — the man most able to repair his errors and arrest the ruin plainly impending over the great republic. It will be observed that the convention speaks of the reservation of the Union as the principal object. But this declaration would have hadfore their military strength is entirely broken. In this view, they would be more inclined to treat with McClellan than Lincoln. But the Northern people will see less cause for change when Lincoln's administration brings success. The London NLincoln's administration brings success. The London News says: In presence of the great movements in the field, the proceedings of the Chicago Convention are of much less importance than otherwise might be. McClellan's platform is friendly to the Union, with efforts for its pacific re-establish
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
The European Press on American affairs. --The London papers of the 12th are discussing the latest political news from the United States, and thus speculate on the chances of the Yankee candidates. The London Times says: Never, since the war began, has there been such a display of vigor and enemy on both sides. Battle succeeds battle with frightful rapidity. The conflicts are long and bloody — the victories trifling and indecisive. The most important part of the news relates to the Chicago Convention; Lincoln and his pulley have received a heavy check — that convention chose McClellan — the man whom Lincoln endeavored to keep down — the man most able to repair his errors and arrest the ruin plainly impending over the great republic. It will be observed that the convention speaks of the reservation of the Union as the principal object. But this declaration would have had more weight if the convention had stated what course it would recommend in case conciliation and c
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
nciliation and compromise, which it advises, should fail in effecting, as assured they will, the reconstruction of the Union. The London Post says General McClellan has of ways been distinguished by extreme moderation.-- If installed, unfettered by pledges, there is no reason to believe be would not assent to any arrangement which might bring in a termination a war which no one knows better than himself is equally wicked and profitless. The London Star thinks the Yankee success Atlanta and Mobile will powerfully stimulate the war feeling in the North; and inasmuch as they bear very hardly upon the South, it is possible that the Southern leaders may be much inclined to listen to compromise before their military strength is entirely broken. In this view, they would be more inclined to treat with McClellan than Lincoln. But the Northern people will see less cause for change when Lincoln's administration brings success. The London News says: In presence of the gr
J. P. Smith (search for this): article 8
umb, but he only charged me to do the best I could. He knew quite well that the fort could not hold out or make a fight, and that the time for orders from him had passed. I am also blamed for not answering his signals. My reason for this is, that negotiations were then pending, under flag of truce, and therefore I had no right to communicate. As regards my not consulting him about the surrender, I was cut off and surrounded, and could only act on my own responsibility. Besides this, Captains Smith and Thom had visited Fort Gaines only the night previous, and foreseeing the inevitable result, they told me that the General left the matter entirely with me. General Page also came over while I was at the fleet, and learning the whole state of affairs, why did he not assume command and illustrate, just for one day, the mad, forlorn and unavailing desperation of making a human slaughter-pen of Fort Gaines? Instead of this, however, he returned immediately, thus avoiding any implication
led in what was considered the best casemate, threatened with a tremendous conflagration from the buildings within, and the magazine in great danger of being blown up, and all hope of escapes, or of accomplishing the slightest good by holding out, gone. I did not consider Mobile in danger, for the enemy had evidently not come prepared for anything except to gain the harbor for safe anchorage and as a preliminary step towards further operations in the fall. As soon as the fleet ran in, Colonel Williams retreated with his command, and therein acted more sensibly than any of us. The whole line ought to have been prepared for the same thing. Under these circumstances, my command was seized with the appalling conviction that our case was hopeless, and seemed paralyzed with the prospect of certain and useless destruction. I realized all these horrors of the situation, but said nothing and continued diligently to make the necessary dispositions and give encouragement, being resolved on ma
scrape by demanding to be relieved, but I thought that would only make matters worse, for had any other officer, even General Page, himself, attempted to fight that fort another hour, I feel satisfied that there would have been mutiny and a really disgraceful surrender at last. I see it has been stated that I acted contrary to the express orders of General Page. This is not true. I previously intimated to him my condition, and that I would soon have to succumb, but he only charged me to night previous, and foreseeing the inevitable result, they told me that the General left the matter entirely with me. General Page also came over while I was at the fleet, and learning the whole state of affairs, why did he not assume command and iling any implication, which, for his sake, was exactly what I desired, as I entertained the highest possible regard for General Page, and felt conscientiously that I was doing the best that could be done under the circumstances. I regret exceedingly
ly charged me to do the best I could. He knew quite well that the fort could not hold out or make a fight, and that the time for orders from him had passed. I am also blamed for not answering his signals. My reason for this is, that negotiations were then pending, under flag of truce, and therefore I had no right to communicate. As regards my not consulting him about the surrender, I was cut off and surrounded, and could only act on my own responsibility. Besides this, Captains Smith and Thom had visited Fort Gaines only the night previous, and foreseeing the inevitable result, they told me that the General left the matter entirely with me. General Page also came over while I was at the fleet, and learning the whole state of affairs, why did he not assume command and illustrate, just for one day, the mad, forlorn and unavailing desperation of making a human slaughter-pen of Fort Gaines? Instead of this, however, he returned immediately, thus avoiding any implication, which, for h
C. D. Anderson (search for this): article 8
Letter from the Commander of Fort Gaines. The Mobile Advertiser publishes some extracts from a letter from Colonel C. D. Anderson, who surrendered Fort Gaines, and is now in prison at New Orleans. The letter is to his wife, and is given to the public in defence of Colonel Anderson's fame He says: I was compelled to suColonel Anderson's fame He says: I was compelled to surrender Fort Gaines through feelings of mercy for my officers and men, who earnestly appealed to me. The position was utterly untenable, the fleet having passed and an overwhelming force besieging by land, the only three guns with which I could have responded to the fleet disabled, my picked line driven back to the last notch, the The Yankees will not allow us to do so, because they say they cannot control the ladies. Verily, a more loyal people to the South cannot be found. I will write you in my next of my condition here which is anything but pleasant. I am quite well at present. My love to all. Affectionately, your husband. C. D. Anderson.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 8
isters and little children represented in that command. * * * * * Rest assured that it will come right after awhile. Meantime do not suffer yourself to be annoyed by what you may hear derogatory to me. * * You cannot conceive the curious and absurdly false rumors about us that are in circulation even amongst the Southern sympathizers here, such for instance as "that I am a Baltimore Plug-ugly and sold Fort Gaines, and that numbers of us are taking the cath of allegiance to the United States," &.--Our friends here are rapidly arriving at the truth, however, and the ladies, who are still fondly devoted to our cause, are viewing with each other in doing us honor and kindness, though we are not permitted to look upon their faces. The Yankees will not allow us to do so, because they say they cannot control the ladies. Verily, a more loyal people to the South cannot be found. I will write you in my next of my condition here which is anything but pleasant. I am quite well
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