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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 1, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 523 total hits in 255 results.

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O. B. Caldwell (search for this): article 11
A minister Flogged, --The Rev. O. B. Caldwell, who is on duty in General Whealer's corps, gives the Bristol Gazette the following narrative of shocking and Sending cruelty displayed by East Tennessee Unionist towards a Presbyterian minister, He says: Our people are all hopeful, yet they are suffering as people never did before. The oppression has turned to a religious persecution. Rev. George Egleton, paster of the New Market Presbyterian Church, was ordered by the Union man to quit preaching. He knew it was not done by proper authority, so he continued, and the next work was taken out of his bed and marched down the railroad below town, and ordered to draw his coat, then his and when he refused, it was which off of him. Then two men, who had with , whipped him, while a third one stood before and with drawn pistols, threatening his life if he my resistance, Part of the time he was unconscious of his awful condition. Two weeks have elapsed and still his wounds and un
A minister Flogged, --The Rev. O. B. Caldwell, who is on duty in General Whealer's corps, gives the Bristol Gazette the following narrative of shocking and Sending cruelty displayed by East Tennessee Unionist towards a Presbyterian minister, He says: Our people are all hopeful, yet they are suffering as people never did before. The oppression has turned to a religious persecution. Rev. George Egleton, paster of the New Market Presbyterian Church, was ordered by the Union man to quit preaching. He knew it was not done by proper authority, so he continued, and the next work was taken out of his bed and marched down the railroad below town, and ordered to draw his coat, then his and when he refused, it was which off of him. Then two men, who had with , whipped him, while a third one stood before and with drawn pistols, threatening his life if he my resistance, Part of the time he was unconscious of his awful condition. Two weeks have elapsed and still his wounds and un
George Egleton (search for this): article 11
A minister Flogged, --The Rev. O. B. Caldwell, who is on duty in General Whealer's corps, gives the Bristol Gazette the following narrative of shocking and Sending cruelty displayed by East Tennessee Unionist towards a Presbyterian minister, He says: Our people are all hopeful, yet they are suffering as people never did before. The oppression has turned to a religious persecution. Rev. George Egleton, paster of the New Market Presbyterian Church, was ordered by the Union man to quit preaching. He knew it was not done by proper authority, so he continued, and the next work was taken out of his bed and marched down the railroad below town, and ordered to draw his coat, then his and when he refused, it was which off of him. Then two men, who had with , whipped him, while a third one stood before and with drawn pistols, threatening his life if he my resistance, Part of the time he was unconscious of his awful condition. Two weeks have elapsed and still his wounds and un
Isaac N. Caldwell (search for this): article 11
was which off of him. Then two men, who had with , whipped him, while a third one stood before and with drawn pistols, threatening his life if he my resistance, Part of the time he was unconscious of his awful condition. Two weeks have elapsed and still his wounds and unhealed; but he had to flee for his life. Yet this man was more quiet and peaceable than any one else, and no charge was made against him except that, because he was a rebel minister, he was a minister of the devil. This whole affair was conducted by men in his own church, and some of the good old christian men were at his door ready to dress his wounds when he returned. But the worst of all was, that the same threat was extended to all who sympathized with him or showed him any favors. Rev. John McCampbell and Rev. Isaac N. Caldwell were also threatened with the same treatment if they did not leave the country. So they all thought prudence the better part of valor, and have left their homes and their churches.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 11
A minister Flogged, --The Rev. O. B. Caldwell, who is on duty in General Whealer's corps, gives the Bristol Gazette the following narrative of shocking and Sending cruelty displayed by East Tennessee Unionist towards a Presbyterian minister, He says: Our people are all hopeful, yet they are suffering as people never did before. The oppression has turned to a religious persecution. Rev. George Egleton, paster of the New Market Presbyterian Church, was ordered by the Union man to quit preaching. He knew it was not done by proper authority, so he continued, and the next work was taken out of his bed and marched down the railroad below town, and ordered to draw his coat, then his and when he refused, it was which off of him. Then two men, who had with , whipped him, while a third one stood before and with drawn pistols, threatening his life if he my resistance, Part of the time he was unconscious of his awful condition. Two weeks have elapsed and still his wounds and unh
A Yankee railroad, --The Way They Build Then.--Grant's railroad from city Point to the Weldon road, is nine miles long, and was built in eleven days. A letter describing it, says: "Two days were lost to the force by the sinking of a vessel having a portion of the material on board, which reduces it practically to a nine days job. No previous surveys had been made to establish the route, or ascertain grades, and the most remarkable feature of the whole is, that none were made at all. The line was located by the eye, without the aid of a compass, and no instruments were need to guage the evenness or degree of curvature to be established at different points. No measurement was made or taken in laying the track from one end to the other — not even a tape line or "ten feet." poles !-- All was gauged by the eye — estimated by paces. The practical skill of the construction corps enabled them to seise the best location for the road at a glance, and to direct its details without
United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
vature to be established at different points. No measurement was made or taken in laying the track from one end to the other — not even a tape line or "ten feet." poles !-- All was gauged by the eye — estimated by paces. The practical skill of the construction corps enabled them to seise the best location for the road at a glance, and to direct its details without the engineering appliances usually deemed indispensable.-- Several ravines of considerable pitch and depth on the way. A of logs were built up, heavy timbers run from one to another for stringers, cross-ties put down on these, the rails nailed down in the usual manner, and the result is a substantial roadbed, equal to best trestlework in the United States for temporary use. One of these bridges is eight hundred feet long and fifteen feet high; the other, eight hundred and twenty feet in length and twenty-five feet in height at its greatest elevation. Very little filling or cutting was done at any point on the line.
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
A Yankee railroad, --The Way They Build Then.--Grant's railroad from city Point to the Weldon road, is nine miles long, and was built in eleven days. A letter describing it, says: "Two days were lost to the force by the sinking of a vessel having a portion of the material on board, which reduces it practically to a nine days job. No previous surveys had been made to establish the route, or ascertain grades, and the most remarkable feature of the whole is, that none were made at all. The line was located by the eye, without the aid of a compass, and no instruments were need to guage the evenness or degree of curvature to be established at different points. No measurement was made or taken in laying the track from one end to the other — not even a tape line or "ten feet." poles !-- All was gauged by the eye — estimated by paces. The practical skill of the construction corps enabled them to seise the best location for the road at a glance, and to direct its details without t
Wakulla (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 13
A New Remedy for Chills., --We learn that the herb known as Queen's Delight (Stillingia) is a sure preventive of chills and fever. It should be taken just before or just as the chill is coming on, and it will soon put the patient in a profuse perspiration. The manner of preparing it is to make a strong tea of the root, either in a green or dry state. Take doses of a wine glass full until it produces perspiration. It is said to have cured many in Wakulla county.-- Tallahassee Floridian.
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 14
The Goldsborough Journal says it has received undoubted information that yellow fever rages violently at Newbern, North Carolina, Killing a large number of Yankees daily.
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