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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 1, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Thomas W. Doswell (search for this): article 9
Forgery. --Two soldiers, named N. Hollingeworth, company H, Fourth Texas, and M. M. Holshouse, company K, Fourth North Carolina, charged with forgery, were taken before Captain Thomas W. Doswell, assistant provost-marshal, yesterday, and by him committed to the Castle to await an examination by court-martial.
N. Hollingeworth (search for this): article 9
Forgery. --Two soldiers, named N. Hollingeworth, company H, Fourth Texas, and M. M. Holshouse, company K, Fourth North Carolina, charged with forgery, were taken before Captain Thomas W. Doswell, assistant provost-marshal, yesterday, and by him committed to the Castle to await an examination by court-martial.
M. M. Holshouse (search for this): article 9
Forgery. --Two soldiers, named N. Hollingeworth, company H, Fourth Texas, and M. M. Holshouse, company K, Fourth North Carolina, charged with forgery, were taken before Captain Thomas W. Doswell, assistant provost-marshal, yesterday, and by him committed to the Castle to await an examination by court-martial.
W. H. Cross (search for this): article 10
Altering a furlough. --Upon the charge of altering the date of his furlough, Corporal W. H. Cross, member of company B, Fourteenth Alabama, was arrested and sent to Castle Thunder yesterday morning.
September 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 11
The cavalry question. Richmond, September 28, 1864. To the Editor of the Richmond Dispatch: In your issue of yesterday you have some very sensible remarks about our cavalry; and in your paper of to-day, "Broadsword" has given you his views as to the cause of the inefficiency of this arm of our service. New, without meaning to attempt even to controvert, or to discuss, the merits either of your remarks or of the views of "Broadsword," I would respectfully beg to be allowed to refer to one other cause of this inefficiency. As you may be aware, the horses are owned by the men; and when a man loses his horse, unless able to get another, he is placed in the infantry. Now, in these times, when "horse flesh" is so high and the pay and emoluments of the privates so low, it is almost impossible for a man to supply himself again, after having once perhaps spent his last cent in the purchase of his horse, It is true, the Confederate States will pay the mighty sum of two hundred dolla
United States (United States) (search for this): article 11
," I would respectfully beg to be allowed to refer to one other cause of this inefficiency. As you may be aware, the horses are owned by the men; and when a man loses his horse, unless able to get another, he is placed in the infantry. Now, in these times, when "horse flesh" is so high and the pay and emoluments of the privates so low, it is almost impossible for a man to supply himself again, after having once perhaps spent his last cent in the purchase of his horse, It is true, the Confederate States will pay the mighty sum of two hundred dollars for a horse actually killed in battle; but that sum will barely pay for the "red tape" with which his papers must be enveloped before he can even hope to get the account through the various offices through which it must pass. Seeing that the capture or other loss of the horse must be a dead loss to him, of course the man is going to do all in his power to save his horse; and may this not account in some measure for the time which some of
The situation. The grand man├Žuvre which the Yankee papers according to their custom, have been hinting at for the last three weeks as about to be executed, and to result in something if it would astonish all the world and the rest of mankind, has at length been tried. It has not captured Richmond, but it has procured "hospitable graves" for many of Grant's cut-threats, black and white. What will be try next to. Why, we suppose he will manufacture a bulletin, in which he will announce the most splendid success, and which will set the whole semi-barbarous generation represented by him and his army to screaming, dancing, throwing up their hats, and shouting for old Abe. That is all he has done since he has been in command of the grand army, and it is pretty much all that he can expect to do hereafter. But that will not take Richmond, although it may, and no doubt will, assist greatly in electing Lincoln. The sudden abandonment of Fort Harrison by our troops was a sad affair
d "hospitable graves" for many of Grant's cut-threats, black and white. What will be try next to. Why, we suppose he will manufacture a bulletin, in which he will announce the most splendid success, and which will set the whole semi-barbarous generation represented by him and his army to screaming, dancing, throwing up their hats, and shouting for old Abe. That is all he has done since he has been in command of the grand army, and it is pretty much all that he can expect to do hereafter. But that will not take Richmond, although it may, and no doubt will, assist greatly in electing Lincoln. The sudden abandonment of Fort Harrison by our troops was a sad affair. It proves that none but tried veterans ought to be entrusted with the defence of outposts, liable at all times to be suddenly attacked and to be overwhelmed before the arrival of assistance. The Yankees will represent the capture of this post as a great victory, of course. But time will show whether it is so or not.
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
d "hospitable graves" for many of Grant's cut-threats, black and white. What will be try next to. Why, we suppose he will manufacture a bulletin, in which he will announce the most splendid success, and which will set the whole semi-barbarous generation represented by him and his army to screaming, dancing, throwing up their hats, and shouting for old Abe. That is all he has done since he has been in command of the grand army, and it is pretty much all that he can expect to do hereafter. But that will not take Richmond, although it may, and no doubt will, assist greatly in electing Lincoln. The sudden abandonment of Fort Harrison by our troops was a sad affair. It proves that none but tried veterans ought to be entrusted with the defence of outposts, liable at all times to be suddenly attacked and to be overwhelmed before the arrival of assistance. The Yankees will represent the capture of this post as a great victory, of course. But time will show whether it is so or not.
l slavery, under the name of villeins, and the whole body were made subject to the will each of a separate lord. The word "curfew" is to this day a badge of Anglo-Saxon servitude under Norman masters. It arose from a law imposed by the conquerors, compelling the Saxon population to put out their fires and extinguish their lights The Normans were masters. The English were slaves, that was all. Yet, ever since Edmund Burke first uttered his nonsense in the House of Commons about the Anglo-Saxon race, every fool whose mother tongue is English considers it a high honor to be a descendant of these serfs to the Normans; for they were no better. The English have certainly been a great people; but alas! for their Anglo-Saxon progenitors! If such a feeble struggle as that of the Saxons is worthy of such commendation as this, in what terms does the defence of our liberties, in which we are now engaged, deserve to be recorded? What did the Saxons do, compared to what we have done?
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