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against a force not so large as that which Grant now has before Petersburg. They "fought so long;"that is to say, they fought about twelve hours. A single battle effectually crushed all resistance worthy of the name, for though sporadic cases of insurrection occurred from time to time, for three or four years afterwards, no serious or organized opposition was made to the invader save in that single instance. The people here eulogized in language too florid even for the deeds of Bruce and Wallace succumbed beneath the weight of the first blow. The conquest was the most absolute, the submission the most abject, the terms the most degrading, the law imposed the hardest and most remorseless, of which we have any account in modern history. The conquerors imposed their own laws, substituted their own language in all legal proceedings, took every foot of land from the conquered and divided it among themselves, substituted their own tenures, and completely abolished those of the Saxons.
at of this Norman conquest, such patriotic valor would have extorted from those whom policy, and interest had made their enemies." The above is an extract from a review of Thierry's history of the Norman conquest of England, published many years ago in a British periodical, the Foreign Monthly Magazine. It is predicated of the conquest of England by William of Normandy. The gallant "resistance" there spoken of, consisted in fighting one battle against a force not so large as that which Grant now has before Petersburg. They "fought so long;"that is to say, they fought about twelve hours. A single battle effectually crushed all resistance worthy of the name, for though sporadic cases of insurrection occurred from time to time, for three or four years afterwards, no serious or organized opposition was made to the invader save in that single instance. The people here eulogized in language too florid even for the deeds of Bruce and Wallace succumbed beneath the weight of the first
io, non-conquisitio," so it is called by Blackstone, who wrote very little more than a century ago. To us it seems to have been the most thorough of all possible conquests. The Normans were masters. The English were slaves, that was all. Yet, ever since Edmund Burke first uttered his nonsense in the House of Commons about the Anglo-Saxon race, every fool whose mother tongue is English considers it a high honor to be a descendant of these serfs to the Normans; for they were no better. The English have certainly been a great people; but alas! for their Anglo-Saxon progenitors! If such a feeble struggle as that of the Saxons is worthy of such commendation as this, in what terms does the defence of our liberties, in which we are now engaged, deserve to be recorded? What did the Saxons do, compared to what we have done? They yielded at the first onset, after a single battle, to an army of fifty or sixty thousand invaders, not more numerous than that with which they met him. As a
o nobly, for their liberties, their families and their homes, that the remembrance of their good fight must ever awaken in the hearts of their descendants those feelings of mingled respect and pity which, in a less barbarous age than that of this Norman conquest, such patriotic valor would have extorted from those whom policy, and interest had made their enemies." The above is an extract from a review of Thierry's history of the Norman conquest of England, published many years ago in a Brits. A large proportion of the peasantry were reduced to actual slavery, under the name of villeins, and the whole body were made subject to the will each of a separate lord. The word "curfew" is to this day a badge of Anglo-Saxon servitude under Norman masters. It arose from a law imposed by the conquerors, compelling the Saxon population to put out their fires and extinguish their lights (couvre feu) on a signal to be given by ringing the bell of the nearest convent, at an early hour in the e
one battle against a force not so large as that which Grant now has before Petersburg. They "fought so long;"that is to say, they fought about twelve hours. A single battle effectually crushed all resistance worthy of the name, for though sporadic cases of insurrection occurred from time to time, for three or four years afterwards, no serious or organized opposition was made to the invader save in that single instance. The people here eulogized in language too florid even for the deeds of Bruce and Wallace succumbed beneath the weight of the first blow. The conquest was the most absolute, the submission the most abject, the terms the most degrading, the law imposed the hardest and most remorseless, of which we have any account in modern history. The conquerors imposed their own laws, substituted their own language in all legal proceedings, took every foot of land from the conquered and divided it among themselves, substituted their own tenures, and completely abolished those of t
Blackstone (search for this): article 2
recorded their own history after their own fashion. The existing relies of monkish contemporary chronicles were, for ages, accessible only to a few, or at least but a few had the industry or the inclination to study them. The field, then, was left open to chroniclers and antiquaries, who made out such a story as they pleased; and it pleased them to say that the accession of England to the conqueror was an "acquisition," not a "conquest." "Acquisitio, non-conquisitio," so it is called by Blackstone, who wrote very little more than a century ago. To us it seems to have been the most thorough of all possible conquests. The Normans were masters. The English were slaves, that was all. Yet, ever since Edmund Burke first uttered his nonsense in the House of Commons about the Anglo-Saxon race, every fool whose mother tongue is English considers it a high honor to be a descendant of these serfs to the Normans; for they were no better. The English have certainly been a great people; but al
Edmund Burke (search for this): article 2
y them. The field, then, was left open to chroniclers and antiquaries, who made out such a story as they pleased; and it pleased them to say that the accession of England to the conqueror was an "acquisition," not a "conquest." "Acquisitio, non-conquisitio," so it is called by Blackstone, who wrote very little more than a century ago. To us it seems to have been the most thorough of all possible conquests. The Normans were masters. The English were slaves, that was all. Yet, ever since Edmund Burke first uttered his nonsense in the House of Commons about the Anglo-Saxon race, every fool whose mother tongue is English considers it a high honor to be a descendant of these serfs to the Normans; for they were no better. The English have certainly been a great people; but alas! for their Anglo-Saxon progenitors! If such a feeble struggle as that of the Saxons is worthy of such commendation as this, in what terms does the defence of our liberties, in which we are now engaged, deser
ave people who, destined to pass under the yoke of the conqueror, fought so long, so nobly, for their liberties, their families and their homes, that the remembrance of their good fight must ever awaken in the hearts of their descendants those feelings of mingled respect and pity which, in a less barbarous age than that of this Norman conquest, such patriotic valor would have extorted from those whom policy, and interest had made their enemies." The above is an extract from a review of Thierry's history of the Norman conquest of England, published many years ago in a British periodical, the Foreign Monthly Magazine. It is predicated of the conquest of England by William of Normandy. The gallant "resistance" there spoken of, consisted in fighting one battle against a force not so large as that which Grant now has before Petersburg. They "fought so long;"that is to say, they fought about twelve hours. A single battle effectually crushed all resistance worthy of the name, for thou
Normandy (France) (search for this): article 2
ever awaken in the hearts of their descendants those feelings of mingled respect and pity which, in a less barbarous age than that of this Norman conquest, such patriotic valor would have extorted from those whom policy, and interest had made their enemies." The above is an extract from a review of Thierry's history of the Norman conquest of England, published many years ago in a British periodical, the Foreign Monthly Magazine. It is predicated of the conquest of England by William of Normandy. The gallant "resistance" there spoken of, consisted in fighting one battle against a force not so large as that which Grant now has before Petersburg. They "fought so long;"that is to say, they fought about twelve hours. A single battle effectually crushed all resistance worthy of the name, for though sporadic cases of insurrection occurred from time to time, for three or four years afterwards, no serious or organized opposition was made to the invader save in that single instance. The
Wanted to Hire, for the balance of the year, a good House Servant and Nurse. Apply at Yerby's, No. 5 Twelfth street, south of Main. se 29--1t*
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