hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 22 0 Browse Search
E. Noyes 21 1 Browse Search
Lincoln 19 5 Browse Search
Averill 18 4 Browse Search
Early 16 6 Browse Search
Sheridan 15 3 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 14 0 Browse Search
Forrest 13 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 3, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 18 total hits in 9 results.

Death of Colonel George Patton. Through late Northern papers we have the melancholy intelligence of the death of Colonel George Patton, of a wound received in the battle near Winchester on the 19th ultimo. Colonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the
e partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the summer of 1863. In many battles in which he was subsequently engaged he proved his bravery and his fitness to command. The South could ill afford to lose such a man in a period like the present; but he has left behind him an honorable name, and his memory will be cherished by all who entertain respect for courage, manliness and high-toned chivalry. Colonel Patton was not probably more than thirty years of age, but he had achieved a reputation of which many older officers might be proud. Two of his broth
ha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the summer of 1863. In many battles in which he was subsequently engaged he proved his bravery and his fitness to command. The South could ill afford to lose such a man in a period like the present; but he has left behind him an honorable name, and his memory will be cherished by all who entertain respect for courage, manliness and high-toned chivalry. Colonel Patton was not probably more than thirty years of age, but he had achieved a reputation of which many older officers might be
George Patton (search for this): article 2
Death of Colonel George Patton. Through late Northern papers we have the melancholy intelligence of the death of Colonel George Patton, of a wound received in the battle near Winchester on the 19th ultimo. Colonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his liColonel George Patton, of a wound received in the battle near Winchester on the 19th ultimo. Colonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke outColonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in th
John M. Patton (search for this): article 2
h of Colonel George Patton. Through late Northern papers we have the melancholy intelligence of the death of Colonel George Patton, of a wound received in the battle near Winchester on the 19th ultimo. Colonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where,ed his bravery and his fitness to command. The South could ill afford to lose such a man in a period like the present; but he has left behind him an honorable name, and his memory will be cherished by all who entertain respect for courage, manliness and high-toned chivalry. Colonel Patton was not probably more than thirty years of age, but he had achieved a reputation of which many older officers might be proud. Two of his brothers are still in the service, both holding the rank of colonel.
George W. Summers (search for this): article 2
Through late Northern papers we have the melancholy intelligence of the death of Colonel George Patton, of a wound received in the battle near Winchester on the 19th ultimo. Colonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the summer of 1863. In many battles
Kanawha (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
Death of Colonel George Patton. Through late Northern papers we have the melancholy intelligence of the death of Colonel George Patton, of a wound received in the battle near Winchester on the 19th ultimo. Colonel Patton was a son of the late John M. Patton, of this city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the
Scary (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
rn independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the summer of 1863. In many battles in which he was subsequently engaged he proved his bravery and his fitness to command. The South could ill afford to lose such a man in a period like the present; but he has left behind him an honorable name, and his memory will be cherished by all who entertain respect for courage, manliness and high-toned chivalry. Col
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
city, and is the second of the family who has yielded his life in this war for Southern independence. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but adopted the profession of the law, and settled in Kanawha county, where, as the partner of George W. Summers, and by the application of his own brilliant intellect, he soon attained a high position at the bar. When the war broke out, however, he was among the first to offer his services to his country. In an arduous campaign in Western Virginia he greatly distinguished himself, and was badly wounded at the battle of Scary. As soon as he recovered he again took the field, and was in command of our forces at White Sulphur Springs which defeated Averill in the summer of 1863. In many battles in which he was subsequently engaged he proved his bravery and his fitness to command. The South could ill afford to lose such a man in a period like the present; but he has left behind him an honorable name, and his memory will be cherish