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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
k. It contains many valuable and elegant pieces of workmanship in worsted, some exquisitely-wrought screen needle- work, two bassinets, gilt ottoman, and a large number of small ferns and other articles. The central stalls--"Kentucky" and "Tennessee"--will probably be found the most attractive, not only from their position, but also from the great variety of their contents. "Kentucky" is kept by the lady De Hoghton and Mrs. G. W. Oliver.--Among its exhibitions is a doll house, five feet eihe stem is a figure representing the Confederate States draped in the flag of the Confederacy, and holding in her hands the emblems of Faith, Hope and Charity. On the reverse side is a bale of cotton and the war flag of the Confederates. The "Tennessee" part of the tent is kept by the Lady M. Beresford Hope and Mrs. F. Hull. Here is a large and apparently very valuable doll's bedstead, a picture of the Holy Family in Parian, a box of small busts of Jefferson Davis, sent by Lady Beresford Hop
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
The fronts of all the stalls are covered with small silk banners, bearing the stars of the Confederacy and the motto, "Deo Vindice." On entering the hall from the east lobby, the first stall on the left hand is "Virginia, " held by the Countess de Dampierre, Mrs. Patterson and Mrs. M. G. Klingender. The great attractions on this stall are a number of artistically-designed albums of the Confederate generals, a bronze of Mephistopheles, and various small articles of interest. "North Carolina" is the next stall in order, and it is presided over by Mrs. Spence and Mrs. F. Worthington. It is richly laden with china vases, and contains a magnificently-gilt clock. "South Carolina," the next stall, is held by the Lady Wharncliffe and Mrs. Pricleau. It contains chiefly small, but richly-wrought, articles of needle-work, scarfs, pictures, and baskets of elegant workmanship. The "Georgia" stall is very finely decorated externally, but the interior is devoted chiefly to baby lin
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 4
guineas), and models of wild Alabama flowers in wax. Alabama is kept by Mrs. Malcomson and Mrs. Pratt. The Mississippi tent is kept by the Countess of Chesterfield and the Hon. Mrs. Slidell. It contains many of the most useful contributions, among which are rugs of bearskin. There is also here a large collection of Bohemian dolls. The care of the tent named "Louisiana" is confided to Mrs. Byrne, Mrs. T. Byrne and Mrs. F. Bodewald. This stall contains a very handsome Indian cover from Canada, a single monkey stuffed, and a couple of monkeys stuffed, a miniature organ, a French toilet table, and smaller articles for the toilet. "Texas" is devoted to jewelry, statuettes, timepieces, tapestry, and several richly-worked Mrs. A. Forwood, Mrs. W. Forwood and Mrs. W. Heyn are the ladies in attendance. "Arkansas," at which Mrs. Sillem and Mrs. J. Willink preside, has a model of the ship Florida, several handsome silver jugs, some splendid American an American rabbit, a very
Havre (France) (search for this): article 4
om all that one can observe, desire to witness the end of this bloody struggle quite as much as do all right-thinking men in England. Personal and material interests, however, have less to do with that feeling than formerly. The cotton trade of Havre and Rouen has gradually righted itself, at least to a certain extent. As in England, other supplies have been landed at Havre, and trade has gradually recovered. The exportation trade generally, from France to America, has not, strange to say, Havre, and trade has gradually recovered. The exportation trade generally, from France to America, has not, strange to say, fallen off. The wealthy in the Northern States buy largely from France. The alarm once felt in this country about the American war has greatly diminished. But the desire for peace is not less universal. Humanitarian as well as material interests associate the Government and people of France with the sentiments embodied in the peace address of the British nation. The great Southern bazaar in Liverpool for the Relief of Southern Prisoners. On the 19th ultimo, one of the most magnifi
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 4
an dolls. The care of the tent named "Louisiana" is confided to Mrs. Byrne, Mrs. T. Byrne and Mrs. F. Bodewald. This stall contains a very handsome Indian cover from Canada, a single monkey stuffed, and a couple of monkeys stuffed, a miniature organ, a French toilet table, and smaller articles for the toilet. "Texas" is devoted to jewelry, statuettes, timepieces, tapestry, and several richly-worked Mrs. A. Forwood, Mrs. W. Forwood and Mrs. W. Heyn are the ladies in attendance. "Arkansas," at which Mrs. Sillem and Mrs. J. Willink preside, has a model of the ship Florida, several handsome silver jugs, some splendid American an American rabbit, a very pretty child's bassinet, together with baskets and multifarious other small articles. During the morning the basr was so densely crowded that locomotion was almost impossible, and the business transacted was exceedingly profitable to the relief fund. The basr continues open for three days more. The advance in the Con
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 4
ll's bedstead, a picture of the Holy Family in Parian, a box of small busts of Jefferson Davis, sent by Lady Beresford Hope, and some small Swise ornaments. "Alabama," the end tent on the western side, is devoted to some of the most interesting and costly articles of the bazaar. Among these is a clock representing the cathedrll.--The stall also contains rope-dancers, various other figures, boxes of coins, pieces of needlework (one of these valued at thirty guineas), and models of wild Alabama flowers in wax. Alabama is kept by Mrs. Malcomson and Mrs. Pratt. The Mississippi tent is kept by the Countess of Chesterfield and the Hon. Mrs. Slidell. It Alabama is kept by Mrs. Malcomson and Mrs. Pratt. The Mississippi tent is kept by the Countess of Chesterfield and the Hon. Mrs. Slidell. It contains many of the most useful contributions, among which are rugs of bearskin. There is also here a large collection of Bohemian dolls. The care of the tent named "Louisiana" is confided to Mrs. Byrne, Mrs. T. Byrne and Mrs. F. Bodewald. This stall contains a very handsome Indian cover from Canada, a single monkey stuffed, an
Milan, Sullivan County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 4
f the Confederates. The "Tennessee" part of the tent is kept by the Lady M. Beresford Hope and Mrs. F. Hull. Here is a large and apparently very valuable doll's bedstead, a picture of the Holy Family in Parian, a box of small busts of Jefferson Davis, sent by Lady Beresford Hope, and some small Swise ornaments. "Alabama," the end tent on the western side, is devoted to some of the most interesting and costly articles of the bazaar. Among these is a clock representing the cathedral of Milan, in pearl shell.--The stall also contains rope-dancers, various other figures, boxes of coins, pieces of needlework (one of these valued at thirty guineas), and models of wild Alabama flowers in wax. Alabama is kept by Mrs. Malcomson and Mrs. Pratt. The Mississippi tent is kept by the Countess of Chesterfield and the Hon. Mrs. Slidell. It contains many of the most useful contributions, among which are rugs of bearskin. There is also here a large collection of Bohemian dolls. The care
Chesterfield (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
ts. "Alabama," the end tent on the western side, is devoted to some of the most interesting and costly articles of the bazaar. Among these is a clock representing the cathedral of Milan, in pearl shell.--The stall also contains rope-dancers, various other figures, boxes of coins, pieces of needlework (one of these valued at thirty guineas), and models of wild Alabama flowers in wax. Alabama is kept by Mrs. Malcomson and Mrs. Pratt. The Mississippi tent is kept by the Countess of Chesterfield and the Hon. Mrs. Slidell. It contains many of the most useful contributions, among which are rugs of bearskin. There is also here a large collection of Bohemian dolls. The care of the tent named "Louisiana" is confided to Mrs. Byrne, Mrs. T. Byrne and Mrs. F. Bodewald. This stall contains a very handsome Indian cover from Canada, a single monkey stuffed, and a couple of monkeys stuffed, a miniature organ, a French toilet table, and smaller articles for the toilet. "Texas" is dev
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 4
e stall also contains rope-dancers, various other figures, boxes of coins, pieces of needlework (one of these valued at thirty guineas), and models of wild Alabama flowers in wax. Alabama is kept by Mrs. Malcomson and Mrs. Pratt. The Mississippi tent is kept by the Countess of Chesterfield and the Hon. Mrs. Slidell. It contains many of the most useful contributions, among which are rugs of bearskin. There is also here a large collection of Bohemian dolls. The care of the tent named "Louisiana" is confided to Mrs. Byrne, Mrs. T. Byrne and Mrs. F. Bodewald. This stall contains a very handsome Indian cover from Canada, a single monkey stuffed, and a couple of monkeys stuffed, a miniature organ, a French toilet table, and smaller articles for the toilet. "Texas" is devoted to jewelry, statuettes, timepieces, tapestry, and several richly-worked Mrs. A. Forwood, Mrs. W. Forwood and Mrs. W. Heyn are the ladies in attendance. "Arkansas," at which Mrs. Sillem and Mrs. J. Wil
United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
se, from which springs a palmetto tree, supporting the glass. At the base of the stem is a figure representing the Confederate States draped in the flag of the Confederacy, and holding in her hands the emblems of Faith, Hope and Charity. On the revs given to the The London press on Lincoln's election. The Times, commenting on the state of portion in the United States, says "peace has scene friends, but no party which cannot be swept away by the report of a single victory." It adds: London Times, says: "I must positively contradict the assertion that Captain Semmes was a passenger in the Laurel. A United States man-of-war went in pursuit of the Laurel for the purpose of apprehending Captain Semmes, who has been pronounced a pred and set her clothes on fire. Louis Napoleon is trying the "Banting" system for the reduction of corpulence. Alexander Dumas is coming to the United States. Late Paris fashions represent the ladies wearing coat tails a yard long.
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