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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Later from Europe. The Hibernian, from Londonderry on the 2d instant, arrived at Portland on the 17th with five days later news. The following is a telegraphic summary: Earl Russell had replied to the recent manifesto of the Confederate Congress expressing equal friendship for North and South, deploring the war, and pledging England to strict neutrality. The Times thinks Mr. Lincoln will make some attempt to close the war by negotiation. A meeting was held at Bristol to celebrate Mr. Lincoln's re-election to the Presidency. Cheers were given for Jeff Davis and General Lee, and groans for Grant, Butler and Lincoln. A rush was then made for the platform and the speakers driven away from it. The police finally cleared the room.
Robert E. Love, a lawyer, of Salisbury, North Carolina, was accidentally killed at that place on the 8th instant while he was walking on the railroad track, reading a newspaper. He was overtaken by a wood train, running backwards, and killed instantly.
Presentation at Bermuda. --The following paragraph, from the Bermuda Advocate of the 9th instant, explains itself: "The Government of the Confederate States presented the Hon. J. W. Ritchie, to-day, with a beautiful and massive service of silver plate, as a testimonial of their gratitude for his valuable and gratuitous professional services in connection with the Chesapeake case. The presentation took place in the Halifax Hotel, in presence of a large number of our leading citizens, and others whom sympathy with the Southern cause, or a spirit of curiosity, called thither. Mr. Holcombe, well known as one of the late Niagara peace negotiators, prefaced the ceremony with a very appropriate address. He had been sent by President Davis to inquire into the particulars of the Chesapeake affair. He was delighted to find that the Confederate interest had been looked after, and Confederate rights asserted with as much zeal and ability as if their own law officers had been prese
marshal at Nashville reports five thousand prisoners and forty-nine pieces of artillery as being already secured. It is ascertained that, in transmitting General Thomas's report last night, a telegraphic mistake was made at Louisville or Nashville in the estimated number of our casualties. The dispatch, written by General Thomas, stated that his whole loss would not exceed three thousand, and very few were killed. A dispatch from Lexington, this evening, states that, on the 13th instant, at Kingsport, Tennessee, General Burbridge had a fight with Basil Duke's brigade, formerly John Morgan's, and routed it, with a loss to the enemy of one hundred and fifty killed, wounded and prisoners, and their train.--Dick Morgan, brother of John, was captured. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. The St. Albans raiders--General Dix's order revoked. General Dix has issued the following: Headquarters Department of the East, New York City, December 17, 1864. Gener
Five Hundred Dollars reward. --Lemuel, a stout black boy, about twenty-two years of age, left my house on the 13th instant. He has a short neck; broad fat face; would weigh about one hundred and eighty pounds. --His manners are pleasant, and his answers prompt and polite. He may be in the neighborhood of Mrs. farm, on Chickahominy swamp, or about Richmond. I will give Five Hundred Dollars reward for his delivery at the Henrico county jail. Geo D. Pleasants, Administrator of James W. Sheed. de 19--6t
Five Hundred Dollars reward. --My boy Fred left my house on the 13th instant. He is about twenty-three years old; black, stands and walks very erect; rather long face, with little or no beard; slow to answer when spoken to, and speaks short. He may be about Church Hill or in the neighborhood of Dr. Farrar's, on Newmarket road, where he has a wife. I will give the above reward of Five Hundred Dollars for his delivery at the Henrico county jail. George D. Pleasants. de --6t
The Washington Chronicle of Sunday, received yesterday afternoon, contains the following official bulletin: War Department, December 17, 10 P. M. Major-General John A. New York Dispatches have been received to-day from General Foster, who had a personal interview on the morning of Wednesday, the 14th instant, with General Sherman, at For which had been taken by assault on the preceding day. Savannah was closely designed, and its capture, with the rebel forces there, was confidently expected. It was to be summoned in two days, and if not surrendered. Sherman would open his batteries upon it. General Foster reports that Sherman's army "is in splendid condition, having lived on its march on the turkeys, chickens, sweet potatoes, and other good things of the richest part of Georgia." The march was feebly resisted. Nothing has been heard from General Thomas today. Unofficial dispatches state that the provost- marshal at Nashville reports five thousand prisoners
cements to turn out absolutely false and unfounded. Perhaps the telegraph is again to blame, as, from Stanton's bulletin, it appears to have been in diminishing Thomas's casualties from three thousand to three hundred. It is noticeable that Thomas sends no telegram on the 17th, and that the "unofficial" telegrams say nothing of what is going on, and do not tell us where Hood is. It is not impossible that matters have taken a turn, at once unexpected and unpleasant to Thomas, who, on the 16th, according to his own account, was driving our army down ten or a dozen turnpikes at once. Perhaps General Forrest, with his splendid cavalry, have turned up in the right place and put a sudden change upon the aspect of affairs. He has a way of turning up unexpectedly, and always make his presence felt. He had had abundant time to rejoin Hood, even though he were at Murfreesboro' when the fight began; and we think there is little doubt he has done so. This assurance, and the knowledge of t
thousand prisoners and forty-nine pieces of cannon, taken from Hood during the battles of the 15th and 16th. We are not in a position to disprove these statements, but we have repeatedly known quite as positive announcements to turn out absolutely false and unfounded. Perhaps the telegraph is again to blame, as, from Stanton's bulletin, it appears to have been in diminishing Thomas's casualties from three thousand to three hundred. It is noticeable that Thomas sends no telegram on the 17th, and that the "unofficial" telegrams say nothing of what is going on, and do not tell us where Hood is. It is not impossible that matters have taken a turn, at once unexpected and unpleasant to Thomas, who, on the 16th, according to his own account, was driving our army down ten or a dozen turnpikes at once. Perhaps General Forrest, with his splendid cavalry, have turned up in the right place and put a sudden change upon the aspect of affairs. He has a way of turning up unexpectedly, and al
From Savannah. --The latest newspaper account from Savannah is the following paragraph which we find in the Charleston Mercury of the 17th instant: "As far as we have been able to learn, the report of the evacuation of Savannah by our forces, so current yesterday, is altogether without foundation. General Beauregard left the city by the Savannah railroad yesterday morning. Foster's batteries, in the neighborhood of Tilifinny creek, near Coosawatchie, continue to shell, with great vigor, every train that passes the latter point. As yet, however, we have heard of no material damage done; otherwise, all remains quiet along the line of the road."
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