hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Hood 15 3 Browse Search
Christmas 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Sherman 9 1 Browse Search
Bahia (Bahia, Brazil) 8 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 8 0 Browse Search
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Cook 6 0 Browse Search
Kilpatrick 6 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 7 total hits in 5 results.

Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
useless knowledge, because they do not understand them, and do not care to take the trouble of learning. That the people should be taught that war is a simple matter, requiring no special information or study, was, under the circumstances, to be expected, as it accords with human experience. The country was full of gentlemen of education and those distinguished in civil life, but without military information.--A few ideas gained from reading the campaigns of Wellington, Napoleon or Marlborough, was, perhaps, its greatest extent. When the time came for the people to arise these gentlemen must be officers, and, acting upon the popular but dogma "that generals are born and not made"-- Nemo vir magnus sine afflutu aliquo divino unquam fuit --and the army was soon filled with general and other officers incapable of performing the solemn and important duties that devolved upon them. Thus the good of the nation was scarified to ambition, personal selfishness and nepotism; and disas
Wellington (search for this): article 1
idered by far too many as useless knowledge, because they do not understand them, and do not care to take the trouble of learning. That the people should be taught that war is a simple matter, requiring no special information or study, was, under the circumstances, to be expected, as it accords with human experience. The country was full of gentlemen of education and those distinguished in civil life, but without military information.--A few ideas gained from reading the campaigns of Wellington, Napoleon or Marlborough, was, perhaps, its greatest extent. When the time came for the people to arise these gentlemen must be officers, and, acting upon the popular but dogma "that generals are born and not made"-- Nemo vir magnus sine afflutu aliquo divino unquam fuit --and the army was soon filled with general and other officers incapable of performing the solemn and important duties that devolved upon them. Thus the good of the nation was scarified to ambition, personal selfishness
with the differential and integral calculus, or to read before learning the alphabet. The nation that ignores professional information, and undertakes to back its generals in war, must, if this suicidal policy is continued, be languished. Four years of experience in military matters has well taught us that no man can be fit to be a general who has not received a military education, or has not well studied the different branches of the science as a profession. Another consideration enters into the scale in calculating victories. Our country has been divided as to whether the war should be conducted offensively or defensively. For three years the latter policy was adopted, and with success. So marked were its advantages to our cause that its opposers lessened and was confined to a few, with, perhaps, more ambition and bravery that prudence.--Those who are in favor of carrying the war into the enemy's territory should remember that Hannibal of Italy lost Carthage. Bohemian.
ar too many as useless knowledge, because they do not understand them, and do not care to take the trouble of learning. That the people should be taught that war is a simple matter, requiring no special information or study, was, under the circumstances, to be expected, as it accords with human experience. The country was full of gentlemen of education and those distinguished in civil life, but without military information.--A few ideas gained from reading the campaigns of Wellington, Napoleon or Marlborough, was, perhaps, its greatest extent. When the time came for the people to arise these gentlemen must be officers, and, acting upon the popular but dogma "that generals are born and not made"-- Nemo vir magnus sine afflutu aliquo divino unquam fuit --and the army was soon filled with general and other officers incapable of performing the solemn and important duties that devolved upon them. Thus the good of the nation was scarified to ambition, personal selfishness and nepoti
December 20th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
The art and science of War. Wilmington, N. C., December 20, 1864. To the Editor of the Richmond Dispatch; Notwithstanding we have now been engaged in this great contest for nearly four years, and have had experience unrivalled in history, there is no subject so little or so imperfectly understood as that of war! The struggle was commenced with the mistaken and unfortunate idea that generals were born and not made — military knowledge unnecessary; that Bowie-knives, pikes, revolvers and brave men would alone gain battles and give us liberty and independence. The absurdity of such ideas has been proved by a terrible and sad experience. An army not in good discipline, well drilled, and commanded by competent officers, is still but the shadow of an army, incapable of executing great enterprises or of gaining permanent results. Of this the history of war contains abundant proof; and yet, in our own army, we see the elementary branches of the profession grossly neglected.