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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 29, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 818 total hits in 425 results.

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Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
December 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Confederate Congress. Senate. Wednesday, December 28, 1864. The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.; Vice President Stevens in the chair. Mr. Hill, of Georgia, presented a letter from an officer of the army relative to the purchase of clothing from the Government by officers, which was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, from a minority of the Finance Committee, reported adversely to the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the cancellation of four per cent. bonds and certificates received in payment of taxes. On motion, by Mr. Sparrow, the Senate resolved into secret executive session, and soon after adjourned.
Witherspoon (search for this): article 2
opal Church. General Henry Gray, member elect from the State of Louisiana, vice Mr. Hodge, deceased, appeared and took the requisite oath. Mr. Ayer, of South Carolina, introduced a resolution, that the President be requested to inform the House how it has been that our soldiers in the field have been so long without pay, and expressing it as the sense of Congress that the troops in the field ought to be paid in preference to other officers and employees of the Government. Mr. Witherspoon, of South Carolina, offered a resolution, which was adopted, looking to the authorization, by Congress, of the Postmaster General to purchase United States postage stamps for the use of citizens who have relations who are prisoners at the North; and also advocating the giving of the franking privilege to Confederate prisoners. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, introduced a bill to authorize hospital accommodations to retired officers and soldiers. Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, int
expressing it as the sense of Congress that the troops in the field ought to be paid in preference to other officers and employees of the Government. Mr. Witherspoon, of South Carolina, offered a resolution, which was adopted, looking to the authorization, by Congress, of the Postmaster General to purchase United States postage stamps for the use of citizens who have relations who are prisoners at the North; and also advocating the giving of the franking privilege to Confederate prisoners. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, introduced a bill to authorize hospital accommodations to retired officers and soldiers. Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, introduced a resolution, which was adopted, limiting debate to thirty minutes. A resolution of Mr. Colyar, of Tennessee, was adopted, fixing the hour of meeting of the House at 11 o'clock A. M. and adjournment at 10 P. M., with an intervening recess. On motion of Mr. Baldwin, the House went into secret session. Adjourned.
expressing it as the sense of Congress that the troops in the field ought to be paid in preference to other officers and employees of the Government. Mr. Witherspoon, of South Carolina, offered a resolution, which was adopted, looking to the authorization, by Congress, of the Postmaster General to purchase United States postage stamps for the use of citizens who have relations who are prisoners at the North; and also advocating the giving of the franking privilege to Confederate prisoners. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, introduced a bill to authorize hospital accommodations to retired officers and soldiers. Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, introduced a resolution, which was adopted, limiting debate to thirty minutes. A resolution of Mr. Colyar, of Tennessee, was adopted, fixing the hour of meeting of the House at 11 o'clock A. M. and adjournment at 10 P. M., with an intervening recess. On motion of Mr. Baldwin, the House went into secret session. Adjourned.
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