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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Hope Island (Washington, United States) (search for this): article 5
the evacuation of Savannah. The writer says: Our fortifications extended from the Savannah river, some four miles above the city, on our right, to the Little Ogeechee river, near the Gulf railroad, some eight miles from the city, on our left.--We held Fort McAllister, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, a few miles below the Gulf railroad. We also had strong batteries at Rose Dew, between the two Ogeechees, at Beaulieu, Thunderbolt, Causlin's Bluff, etc., and troops stationed on Isle of Hope and Whitmarsh islands. Our newly-erected fortifications on the land side of the city were very strong and capable of turning back almost any kind of assault, though they were not commenced till after Sherman had nearly reached Milledgeville. Sherman's army appeared before these works about the 8th or 9th instant, and on Saturday, the 10th, considerable fighting occurred. --Several severe assaults were made, in which the enemy were signally repulsed. Early on Sunday morning, the 11th, a tre
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): article 5
The evacuation of Savannah — the Latest statements from Southern sources. The Charleston Courier contains a letter giving a very interesting statement of the evacuation of Savannah. The writer says: Our fortifications extended from the Savannah river, some four miles above the city, on our right, to the Little Ogeechee river, near the Gulf railroad, some eight miles from the city, on our left.--We held Fort McAllister, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, a few miles below the Gulf railroad. We also had strong batteries at Rose Dew, between the two Ogeechees, at Beaulieu, Thunderbolt, Causlin's Bluff, etc., and troops stationed on Isle of Hope and Whitmarsh islands. Our newly-erected fortifications on the land side of the city were very strong and capable of turning back almost any kind of assault, though they were not commenced till after Sherman had nearly reached Milledgeville. Sherman's army appeared before these works about the 8th or 9th instant, and on Saturday, the
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
ed guards for the protection of private houses, stores and public buildings. So far as our informant had observed, citizens were unmolested and all private property respected. Our informant states that Sherman demanded the surrender of the city of Savannah unconditionally, stating that, if complied with, favorable terms would be shown to the garrison, but if not, that he would proceed to take it either by assault, investment, or the most sure process of starvation; and if taken in that manner no quarter would be given to the garrison, nor would he be responsible for the conduct of his troops. He afterwards sent a copy of General Hood's demand for the surrender of Dalton. Sherman's inspector-general, who was bearer of the flag of truce with this, informed one of our officers--Captain Macbeth--that Sherman came very near being killed a day or two previous by a fragment of shell from our side. His body servant was killed, and Sherman barely escaped by dodging behind a rock.
Little Ogeechee River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
The evacuation of Savannah — the Latest statements from Southern sources. The Charleston Courier contains a letter giving a very interesting statement of the evacuation of Savannah. The writer says: Our fortifications extended from the Savannah river, some four miles above the city, on our right, to the Little Ogeechee river, near the Gulf railroad, some eight miles from the city, on our left.--We held Fort McAllister, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, a few miles below the Gulf railroad. We also had strong batteries at Rose Dew, between the two Ogeechees, at Beaulieu, Thunderbolt, Causlin's Bluff, etc., and troops stationed on Isle of Hope and Whitmarsh islands. Our newly-erected fortifications on the land side of the city were very strong and capable of turning back almost any kind of assault, though they were not commenced till after Sherman had nearly reached Milledgeville. Sherman's army appeared before these works about the 8th or 9th instant, and on Saturday, the
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
The evacuation of Savannah — the Latest statements from Southern sources. The Charleston Courier contains a letter giving a very interesting statement of the evacuation of Savannah. The writer says: Our fortifications extended from the Savannah river, some four miles above the city, on our right, to the Little Ogeechee river, near the Gulf railroad, some eight miles from the city, on our left.--We held Fort McAllister, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, a few miles below the Gulf railroad. We also had strong batteries at Rose Dew, between the two Ogeechees, at Beaulieu, Thunderbolt, Causlin's Bluff, etc., and troops stationed on Isle of Hope and Whitmarsh islands. Our newly-erected fortifications on the land side of the city were very strong and capable of turning back almost any kind of assault, though they were not commenced till after Sherman had nearly reached Milledgeville. Sherman's army appeared before these works about the 8th or 9th instant, and on Saturday, the
Hardeeville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
be it ever so dreadful. The only intelligence from Savannah, Georgia, from Southern sources, since its evacuation, is the following, from the Augusta Register: It is reported that Sherman has sent a force from his army around to the assistance of Foster's troops, on the Coosa-watchie. The enemy's batteries in that quarter have increased, as evidenced by the continuous shelling of the railroad; doing, however, very little damage. Our cavalry continue to scour the country around Hardeeville. In other respects, affairs in that quarter are unchanged. A gentleman who left Savannah on Thursday night states that Sherman had sent about three regiments into the city as a guard. The remainder of his army is encamped outside the city. --Sherman, it was stated, had offered the Mayor every assistance in preserving order, and had stationed guards for the protection of private houses, stores and public buildings. So far as our informant had observed, citizens were unmolested and
Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
The evacuation of Savannah — the Latest statements from Southern sources. The Charleston Courier contains a letter giving a very interesting statement of the evacuation of Savannah. The writer says: Our fortifications extended from the Savannah river, some four miles above the city, on our right, to the Little Ogeechee river, near the Gulf railroad, some eight miles from the city, on our left.--We held Fort McAllister, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, a few miles below the Gulf railroad. We also had strong batteries at Rose Dew, between the two Ogeechees, at Beaulieu, Thunderbolt, Causlin's Bluff, etc., and troops stationed on Isle of Hope and Whitmarsh islands. Our newly-erected fortifications on the land side of the city were very strong and capable of turning back almost any kind of assault, though they were not commenced till after Sherman had nearly reached Milledgeville. Sherman's army appeared before these works about the 8th or 9th instant, and on Saturday, the
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
Hope was mingled with fear, and it was difficult for any one to decide which preponderated in his own mind. Every man, when he met his neighbor, inquired, and was inquired of, after the news, and neither could gratify the other. All were the victims of every imaginable kind — rumor and opinion, from the best to the worst. I hope never to pass through such dreadful days again. Such suspense is worse agony than any reality, be it ever so dreadful. The only intelligence from Savannah, Georgia, from Southern sources, since its evacuation, is the following, from the Augusta Register: It is reported that Sherman has sent a force from his army around to the assistance of Foster's troops, on the Coosa-watchie. The enemy's batteries in that quarter have increased, as evidenced by the continuous shelling of the railroad; doing, however, very little damage. Our cavalry continue to scour the country around Hardeeville. In other respects, affairs in that quarter are unchanged
Whitmarsh Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
f Savannah. The writer says: Our fortifications extended from the Savannah river, some four miles above the city, on our right, to the Little Ogeechee river, near the Gulf railroad, some eight miles from the city, on our left.--We held Fort McAllister, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, a few miles below the Gulf railroad. We also had strong batteries at Rose Dew, between the two Ogeechees, at Beaulieu, Thunderbolt, Causlin's Bluff, etc., and troops stationed on Isle of Hope and Whitmarsh islands. Our newly-erected fortifications on the land side of the city were very strong and capable of turning back almost any kind of assault, though they were not commenced till after Sherman had nearly reached Milledgeville. Sherman's army appeared before these works about the 8th or 9th instant, and on Saturday, the 10th, considerable fighting occurred. --Several severe assaults were made, in which the enemy were signally repulsed. Early on Sunday morning, the 11th, a tremendous cannona
d guards for the protection of private houses, stores and public buildings. So far as our informant had observed, citizens were unmolested and all private property respected. Our informant states that Sherman demanded the surrender of the city of Savannah unconditionally, stating that, if complied with, favorable terms would be shown to the garrison, but if not, that he would proceed to take it either by assault, investment, or the most sure process of starvation; and if taken in that manner no quarter would be given to the garrison, nor would he be responsible for the conduct of his troops. He afterwards sent a copy of General Hood's demand for the surrender of Dalton. Sherman's inspector-general, who was bearer of the flag of truce with this, informed one of our officers--Captain Macbeth--that Sherman came very near being killed a day or two previous by a fragment of shell from our side. His body servant was killed, and Sherman barely escaped by dodging behind a rock.
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