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New Inlet (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
e seemed lovely. And lo! there on the bar is the blockade-runner Banshee. The fleet see her, and two of them start after her, but she is too quick, and proudly she comes in the inlet, while the men crowd the curtains, and cheer after cheer greets her, which are answered with a vim by her crew. During the night another had come in, whose name I have not learned. I wonder how Mr. Admiral Porter felt at that time, with a fleet of upwards of sixty vessels, not able to effectually blockade New inlet. About 12 o'clock the fleet stood out; the ironsides, which had been lying nearer the fort, got up steam and started out, and soon the whole fleet were out some distance, where they anchored. A bright lookout was kept up at night, but nothing of importance occurred. Wednesday, December 28.--Another beautiful morning. Half of the fleet has disappeared; the rest are going off. 5:20 o'clock P. M.--The rest have disappeared; nothing but the usual blockade squadron are now visible.
ng away again; the commanders of the companies are all at their posts. The bombardment continued terrific till about 5 o'clock, when the firing suddenly slackened from the fleet. It was then discovered that the enemy had succeeded in landing a force at Anderson and Holland batteries and that their line of skirmishers were advancing on the fort. All is excitement now. Our infantry man the parapets; and now the sharp crack of the rifle can be heard instead of the heavy booming of guns.--Faison and Parker have engaged them. But the lull is of short duration — the most terrific bombardment now commences; the fleet have seen their land forces, and they open with greater vim than ever to keep our men from engaging the skirmishers. Colonel Lamb comes rushing up the parapets; he calls for his men to man the line of palisades; with a cheer for him they answer to his call. Away they went after him, and soon they are in line, ready to meet the enemy. The sharp crack of the rifle is mix
e firing. Closer still they come; and now they are in position; a flash, a curl of smoke, and a loud report, followed by the shrieking noise of the shell, from one of the frigates, announces the fight commenced--twenty minutes before one o'clock. And now the fight progresses in earnest; thick fly the shell, loud sounds the thunder of artillery, lurid are the flashes of great guns as they vomit forth their missiles of death and destruction. And oh! nobly stand our men to their guns. From Shepherd's Battery to the Mound they stand unquivering and defiant, loading and firing coolly and calmly, the gunners sighting their guns as if they were practicing at a target. The scene is grand and awful. From every vessel can be seen the white curl of smoke, and high up in the air hundreds of smoky rings are formed from the explosion of shells. The firing does not abate in the least; it increases as the fight progresses, and the noise is deafening. The enemy have concentrated their fire
g; there is no lag in them; they fight as men never fought before with heavy guns. Colonel Lamb and General Whiting are everywhere along the lines encouraging them; from battery to battery they go; the men look at them and smile, and bang away again; the commanders of the companies are all at their posts. The bombardment continued terrific till about 5 o'clock, when the firing suddenly slackened from the fleet. It was then discovered that the enemy had succeeded in landing a force at Anderson and Holland batteries and that their line of skirmishers were advancing on the fort. All is excitement now. Our infantry man the parapets; and now the sharp crack of the rifle can be heard instead of the heavy booming of guns.--Faison and Parker have engaged them. But the lull is of short duration — the most terrific bombardment now commences; the fleet have seen their land forces, and they open with greater vim than ever to keep our men from engaging the skirmishers. Colonel Lamb comes
m engaging the skirmishers. Colonel Lamb comes rushing up the parapets; he calls for his men to man the line of palisades; with a cheer for him they answer to his call. Away they went after him, and soon they are in line, ready to meet the enemy. The sharp crack of the rifle is mixed in with the loud noise of the cannon. The Yankees can be seen creeping away on their bellies, like crawling worms. Lieutenant Hunter, with his Whitworth rifle, is doing good service; Colonel Tansill and Major Saunders are among the junior reserves, encouraging them on; fainter grows the cannonade; the musket firing has ceased; the fleet is drawing off; the land attack has been repulsed. The day's fight is over; and, thank God, all is well. Everything about the land front was now got in readiness with the expectation that a night attack would be made by the land force to storm the fort. A bright lookout was kept up and our pickets were thrown out. Everything was quiet, however, until about 12 o'
Admiral Porter (search for this): article 3
rowned with their white caps, rushing on each other as in a playful gambol, sparkled in its light. All nature seemed lovely. And lo! there on the bar is the blockade-runner Banshee. The fleet see her, and two of them start after her, but she is too quick, and proudly she comes in the inlet, while the men crowd the curtains, and cheer after cheer greets her, which are answered with a vim by her crew. During the night another had come in, whose name I have not learned. I wonder how Mr. Admiral Porter felt at that time, with a fleet of upwards of sixty vessels, not able to effectually blockade New inlet. About 12 o'clock the fleet stood out; the ironsides, which had been lying nearer the fort, got up steam and started out, and soon the whole fleet were out some distance, where they anchored. A bright lookout was kept up at night, but nothing of importance occurred. Wednesday, December 28.--Another beautiful morning. Half of the fleet has disappeared; the rest are going o
ge sustained by the fight. Our noble General Whiting had arrived, and all was confidence and cheerfulness. As the morning dawned, the fleet could be discerned in the distance getting ready to renew the attack; but it was not expected that operations would commence before high tide, which would be about half-past 12 o'clock. However, every man was at his post, ready, at any moment, to again engage the fleet. About 10 o'clock the fleet commenced moving in — their extreme right resting near Gatlin's battery, about six miles up the beach, and their left extending down to the fort. The ironsides led the attack, the frigates resting on her right and left and the monitors to the right of the frigates. I counted fifty-two vessels in all--one ironsides, three or four monitors, four frigates and forty-seven other vessels. They steamed in very slowly, two of the frigates going round to the sea front of the fort, and the iron-clads and monitors lying abreast of the centre front. The ironsi
guns nobly. Some have been, yesterday, fighting all day, and still fighting; there is no lag in them; they fight as men never fought before with heavy guns. Colonel Lamb and General Whiting are everywhere along the lines encouraging them; from battery to battery they go; the men look at them and smile, and bang away again; the ific bombardment now commences; the fleet have seen their land forces, and they open with greater vim than ever to keep our men from engaging the skirmishers. Colonel Lamb comes rushing up the parapets; he calls for his men to man the line of palisades; with a cheer for him they answer to his call. Away they went after him, and 12 o'clock, when our pickets discovered the Yankees landing on the extreme right of the fort, near the mound. The night was dark and a heavy rain had set in.--Colonel Lamb, at the head of his infantry, engaged them, and for awhile the rattle of musketry was heavy; but the enemy are at last driven off, and quiet is again resumed.
in; the commanders of the companies are all at their posts. The bombardment continued terrific till about 5 o'clock, when the firing suddenly slackened from the fleet. It was then discovered that the enemy had succeeded in landing a force at Anderson and Holland batteries and that their line of skirmishers were advancing on the fort. All is excitement now. Our infantry man the parapets; and now the sharp crack of the rifle can be heard instead of the heavy booming of guns.--Faison and Parker have engaged them. But the lull is of short duration — the most terrific bombardment now commences; the fleet have seen their land forces, and they open with greater vim than ever to keep our men from engaging the skirmishers. Colonel Lamb comes rushing up the parapets; he calls for his men to man the line of palisades; with a cheer for him they answer to his call. Away they went after him, and soon they are in line, ready to meet the enemy. The sharp crack of the rifle is mixed in with
on that we would have a night fight was not realized. The night was spent in watchfulness and repairing the slight damage sustained by the fight. Our noble General Whiting had arrived, and all was confidence and cheerfulness. As the morning dawned, the fleet could be discerned in the distance getting ready to renew the attack; ever cease? Will it ever stop? No lull. Bang, bang, bang, quicker than you can count. The sand flies all about. There goes a shell whistling by, close to General Whiting; it buries itself, exploding, covering him all over with the wet sand. He does not even move, not even takes his pipe from his mouth, and only remarks coolly have been, yesterday, fighting all day, and still fighting; there is no lag in them; they fight as men never fought before with heavy guns. Colonel Lamb and General Whiting are everywhere along the lines encouraging them; from battery to battery they go; the men look at them and smile, and bang away again; the commanders of the c
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