hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Sherman 24 2 Browse Search
United States (United States) 22 0 Browse Search
David Childress 16 0 Browse Search
Hood 14 4 Browse Search
Ann Perrin 12 4 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 12 2 Browse Search
N. M. Lee 12 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 11 5 Browse Search
Thomas 11 3 Browse Search
Grant 11 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1865., [Electronic resource].

Found 544 total hits in 293 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
General D. H. Hill arrived in Charleston on the 1st, to report to General Beauregard. Both left on Monday on a special train for Montgomery, from whence they will communicate with General Hood.
General D. H. Hill arrived in Charleston on the 1st, to report to General Beauregard. Both left on Monday on a special train for Montgomery, from whence they will communicate with General Hood.
Runaway.--Five Hundred Dollars Reward. --Left my premises, on Tuesday last, the 3d instant, Augustus, a mulatto boy. He is twenty-five years of age; about five feet nine inches high, with a wen above his right eye. The above reward will be paid if the said boy is delivered to me or confined in the city jail. Powhatan Weisiger, No. 167 Main street, Richmond, Va. ja 10--10t*
n. The removal of General B. F. Butler. The rumored removal of General Butler proves to be correct. A telegram from Washington says: General Grant yesterday relieved General Butler from command. The alleged reason is said to be his failure to capture Fort Fisher, he not considering the opinion of Generals Butler and Weitzel, that to attempt it would be useless, and only lead to unnecessary sacrifice of life. A letter to the New York Herald from City Point, dated the 8th instant, says: The news of the President's Order No. 1, series of 1865, removing Major-General Benjamin F. Butler from the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, is causing much comment, but, so far as I can learn, little or no animadversion. Whether rightfully or not, General Butler has for months past been losing the confidence of the officers of the army, until very few will regret his departure outside of those that swarm around and attach themselves to those in power
Twenty-Five Dollars Reward for a small Negro Boy, named George, about nine years old; gingerbread color, Lost between Union Hill and the Old Market on the 9th instant. I will give the above reward for him if delivered at my residence, on the corner of Twenty-fifth and O streets, Union Hill, or any information so that I can get him. M. F. Allen. ja 12--3t*
ople will, in turn, recognize, by constitutional amendment, the sovereignty and independence of the Southern States over all questions not expressly delegated to the General Government. Seventh. That thereupon the Northern and Southern people shall pledge themselves to a hearty support of measures, peaceable or forcible, for the acquisition of Canada, Mexico, Cuba, and the freedom of Ireland. Invasion by the Indians. A telegram from Julesburg, Colorado territory, dated the 9th instant, gives an account of an Indian invasion, upon "loyal" settlers: On Saturday morning, sixty Indians attacked the overland mail express, about three miles east of this place, and robbed the mail. They also attacked a mule train close by, killing one man and wounding another. The troops at the military post here, numbering fifty to eighty men, immediately started to the relief of the white settlers in the vicinity, and drove the Indians to the bluffs a mile back, where the Indians
liam Hill, charged with breaking a window glass at the Old Dominion Insurance office, and resisting the watchmen in the discharge of their duty, was remanded for indictment by the Hustings Court Grand Jury. Andrew, slave of William White, the negro arrested on Thursday upon the charge of attempting to pass a spurious one dollar coin on Isaac Jacobs, was discharged. The continued case of Sylvan Jerraw and Noah D. Reid, charged with feloniously assaulting and robbing, by force and violence, David Currie, of a gold watch and chain of the value of $2,000, was further postponed till the 17th instant. [It will be recollected by our readers that Mr. Currie was knocked down by these men about half-past 9 o'clock on the night of the 9th instant, near the corner of Main and Nineteenth streets, and had his watch stolen from his pocket.] A few other cases, involving the identity of negroes supposed to be runaways, street obstructions, etc., concluded the morning's entertainment.
illiam Hill, charged with breaking a window glass at the Old Dominion Insurance office, and resisting the watchmen in the discharge of their duty, was remanded for indictment by the Hustings Court Grand Jury. Andrew, slave of William White, the negro arrested on Thursday upon the charge of attempting to pass a spurious one dollar coin on Isaac Jacobs, was discharged. The continued case of Sylvan Jerraw and Noah D. Reid, charged with feloniously assaulting and robbing, by forced violence, David Currie, of a gold watch and chain of the value of $2,000, was further postponed till the 17th instant. [It will be recollected by our readers that Mr. Currie was knocked down by these men about half-past 9 o'clock on the night of the 9th instant, near the corner of Main and Nineteenth streets, and had his watch stolen from his pocket.] A few other cases, involving the identity of negroes supposed to be runaways, street obstructions, etc., concluded the morning's entertainment.
We have received Northern papers of Wednesday, the 11th instant. The Whereabouts of Thomas's army. The New York Times, speaking of Thomas's army, claims that it has been largely reinforced. It says: General Thomas, we learn, is concentrating his magnificent army at Eastport, in the northeastern corner of the State of Mississippi, near the point where the railroad to Mobile crosses the Memphis and Chattanooga road. He will thus have the most convenient base of supplies that our Western army has had since Grant fought the battle of Shiloh--his line of communication being by water, on the Tennessee river. He has not only driven the rebels entirely out of Tennessee, but has put the State in a perfect condition of defence, so that he may be free, at his convenience, to enter on his new campaign southward. The mission of F. P. Blair, Sr. A telegram from Washington, relative to the Blair "mission" to Richmond, says: We hear to-day, from an authentic sour
lliam Hill, charged with breaking a window glass at the Old Dominion Insurance office, and resisting the watchmen in the discharge of their duty, was remanded for indictment by the Hustings Court Grand Jury. Andrew, slave of William White, the negro arrested on Thursday upon the charge of attempting to pass a spurious one dollar coin on Isaac Jacobs, was discharged. The continued case of Sylvan Jerraw and Noah D. Reid, charged with feloniously assaulting and robbing, by force and violence, David Currie, of a gold watch and chain of the value of $2,000, was further postponed till the 17th instant. [It will be recollected by our readers that Mr. Currie was knocked down by these men about half-past 9 o'clock on the night of the 9th instant, near the corner of Main and Nineteenth streets, and had his watch stolen from his pocket.] A few other cases, involving the identity of negroes supposed to be runaways, street obstructions, etc., concluded the morning's entertainment.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...