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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1865., [Electronic resource].

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The moral effect of the capture of Savannah has not been as great even as that of Atlanta. The two together were no such disaster as the defeat of Hood's army. If that army had remained intact, we could have permitted the Federal forces to make as many flying trips through the South as suited their convenience, and establish their headquarters in Savannah or any other Yankee towns that they could fairly capture.--We do not despair of the efficient reorganization of Hood's army and its uHood's army and its ultimate recovery from the losses it has suffered; but its defeats have done more to produce the existing depression than the capture of a hundred Savannahs. The only important loss in that place is the cotton, which ought to have been destroyed, even if it involved the destruction of that enterprising New England city. The Northern sentiment expressed at the late peace meeting in Savannah is only what might have been expected from the Northern men engaged in it. Whilst it is true that amon
timent expressed at the late peace meeting in Savannah is only what might have been expected from the Northern men engaged in it. Whilst it is true that among the most loyal citizens and soldiers of the Confederacy are men of Northern birth, it cannot be denied that those who have come to the South merely for purposes of trade and traffic are not infallible exponents and representatives of the real sentiments of the Southern people.--This is eminently true of Savannah. It has long had more than its proportion of New England trading adventurers, who went there with the single idea of cotton, and who stamped the cotton idea upon the whole aspect of society in that town. We should have been surprised beyond measure if these New Englanders had not produced an Arnold, and had hesitated to endorse Major-General Sherman. But their opinions are not of as much value to us as their cotton. Nothing in the surrender of Savannah has surprised or mortified us, save the loss of that commodity.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The moral effect of the capture of Savannah has not been as great even as that of Atlanta. The two together were no such disaster as the defeat of Hood's army. If that army had remained intact, we could have permitted the Federal forces to make as many flying trips through the South as suited their convenience, and establish their headquarters in Savannah or any other Yankee towns that they could fairly capture.--We do not despair of the efficient reorganization of Hood's army and its ultimate recovery from the losses it has suffered; but its defeats have done more to produce the existing depression than the capture of a hundred Savannahs. The only important loss in that place is the cotton, which ought to have been destroyed, even if it involved the destruction of that enterprising New England city. The Northern sentiment expressed at the late peace meeting in Savannah is only what might have been expected from the Northern men engaged in it. Whilst it is true that amo
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
timent expressed at the late peace meeting in Savannah is only what might have been expected from the Northern men engaged in it. Whilst it is true that among the most loyal citizens and soldiers of the Confederacy are men of Northern birth, it cannot be denied that those who have come to the South merely for purposes of trade and traffic are not infallible exponents and representatives of the real sentiments of the Southern people.--This is eminently true of Savannah. It has long had more than its proportion of New England trading adventurers, who went there with the single idea of cotton, and who stamped the cotton idea upon the whole aspect of society in that town. We should have been surprised beyond measure if these New Englanders had not produced an Arnold, and had hesitated to endorse Major-General Sherman. But their opinions are not of as much value to us as their cotton. Nothing in the surrender of Savannah has surprised or mortified us, save the loss of that commodity.
Americans (search for this): article 2
poke the longest kind of pole into it every day without eliciting a single roar. We agree for once with W. H. Seward when he says that England is responsible for the present calamities of this continent, and that our once prosperous and happy States are now the scenes of almost unparalleled bloodshed and misery, the responsibility rests upon Great Britain. The anti-slavery party in the North would have died out long ago but for the inspirations it received from a country to which all Americans were in the habit of looking for lessons in civilization and morals.--By books of travels, by novels, by songs, by sermons, by reviews, by newspaper articles, by Exeter Halls and political emissaries, by contributions of money, by diplomacy, by social and religious influences; in fine, by every instrumentality that could be brought to bear upon the human mind, England has been laboring for the last thirty years to propel her whole moral weight upon the Northern mind, so as to instigate and
Sutherland (search for this): article 2
uences; in fine, by every instrumentality that could be brought to bear upon the human mind, England has been laboring for the last thirty years to propel her whole moral weight upon the Northern mind, so as to instigate and inflame it to sectional hostility against those States of the Union in which slavery existed. The most distinguished Southern statesman, on a visit to her capital, was ostentatiously slighted by the nobility, and a fugitive slave publicly petted by the same Duchess of Sutherland who dispossessed her white tenantry in Scotland to convert their farms into sheep walks. The South never had a friend in England till this war began! Was all this philanthropy? Every child knows that England has been the greatest slave-trader in the world, and herself planted the institution here which suddenly became so abhorrent to her moral sense. Even an idiot can understand that she only used anti-slavery as a wedge to accomplish the disruption of a hated and formidable power, and
the Tory party and the predominance in the national councils of the commercial interest, national chivalry has been dead in England. The Tories, with all their faults and errors, were the true representatives of the British Lion. That king of beasts disappeared with them.--It is not possible that he is still in his old cage, when Brother Jonathan can poke the longest kind of pole into it every day without eliciting a single roar. We agree for once with W. H. Seward when he says that England is responsible for the present calamities of this continent, and that our once prosperous and happy States are now the scenes of almost unparalleled bloodshed and misery, the responsibility rests upon Great Britain. The anti-slavery party in the North would have died out long ago but for the inspirations it received from a country to which all Americans were in the habit of looking for lessons in civilization and morals.--By books of travels, by novels, by songs, by sermons, by reviews, by
W. H. Seward (search for this): article 2
The insulting letter of Mr. Seward, refusing to receive the amount raised at a fair in England for the benefit of the Confederate prisoners, and distinctly imputing to the English the crime of being the authors of all the troubles in America, is received by the London Times with commendable meekness. Not a spark of resentment or spirit lights up its sluggish comments on that remarkable document. The British Lion is a designation which can hereafter be only ironically applied to Great Brish Lion. That king of beasts disappeared with them.--It is not possible that he is still in his old cage, when Brother Jonathan can poke the longest kind of pole into it every day without eliciting a single roar. We agree for once with W. H. Seward when he says that England is responsible for the present calamities of this continent, and that our once prosperous and happy States are now the scenes of almost unparalleled bloodshed and misery, the responsibility rests upon Great Britain.
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
uld be brought to bear upon the human mind, England has been laboring for the last thirty years to propel her whole moral weight upon the Northern mind, so as to instigate and inflame it to sectional hostility against those States of the Union in which slavery existed. The most distinguished Southern statesman, on a visit to her capital, was ostentatiously slighted by the nobility, and a fugitive slave publicly petted by the same Duchess of Sutherland who dispossessed her white tenantry in Scotland to convert their farms into sheep walks. The South never had a friend in England till this war began! Was all this philanthropy? Every child knows that England has been the greatest slave-trader in the world, and herself planted the institution here which suddenly became so abhorrent to her moral sense. Even an idiot can understand that she only used anti-slavery as a wedge to accomplish the disruption of a hated and formidable power, and hence, now that her object is accomplished, she
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
is received by the London Times with commendable meekness. Not a spark of resentment or spirit lights up its sluggish comments on that remarkable document. The British Lion is a designation which can hereafter be only ironically applied to Great Britain. The King of Beasts is not in the habit of being bearded in his den with impunity. The patient Ass would be a more appropriate emblem of a government which bears anything that can be put upon it, and greatly prefers provender to battle. th W. H. Seward when he says that England is responsible for the present calamities of this continent, and that our once prosperous and happy States are now the scenes of almost unparalleled bloodshed and misery, the responsibility rests upon Great Britain. The anti-slavery party in the North would have died out long ago but for the inspirations it received from a country to which all Americans were in the habit of looking for lessons in civilization and morals.--By books of travels, by novels
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