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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 2 results.

China (China) (search for this): article 3
Porter's Great torpedo. --The New York World, in an editorial on Porter's torpedo, gives the following excellent hit at the unhappy trick, so "gunpowders and pranky," which failed to blow down Fort Fisher: "Early in the Anglo-Chinese war the English were amused by the Chinese army, which met them with the sound of gongs, the braying of trumpets, and a corps of gymnasts, who performed all sorts of acrobatic feats, dressed in hideous costumes. For a time the object of these remarkable exhibitions was not apparent to the European army, and it was supposed to be a custom of the Celestial observed by them in all their battles — probably in the nature of an invocation to their deities. After the battle, however, they captured the general orders of the mandarin chief, and found that the "Children of the Sun" were ordered to sound their abominable gongs and blow their trumpets when the "barbarians"approached, and were promised that the effect would be so terrifying to the Englis
J. L. Porter (search for this): article 3
Porter's Great torpedo. --The New York World, in an editorial on Porter's torpedo, gives the following excellent hit at the unhappy trick, so "gunpowders and pranky," which failed to blow down Fort Fisher: "Early in the Anglo-Chinese war the English were amused by the Chinese army, which met them with the sound of gongs, the braying of trumpets, and a corps of gymnasts, who performed all sorts of acrobatic feats, dressed in hideous costumes. For a time the object of these remarkablePorter's torpedo, gives the following excellent hit at the unhappy trick, so "gunpowders and pranky," which failed to blow down Fort Fisher: "Early in the Anglo-Chinese war the English were amused by the Chinese army, which met them with the sound of gongs, the braying of trumpets, and a corps of gymnasts, who performed all sorts of acrobatic feats, dressed in hideous costumes. For a time the object of these remarkable exhibitions was not apparent to the European army, and it was supposed to be a custom of the Celestial observed by them in all their battles — probably in the nature of an invocation to their deities. After the battle, however, they captured the general orders of the mandarin chief, and found that the "Children of the Sun" were ordered to sound their abominable gongs and blow their trumpets when the "barbarians"approached, and were promised that the effect would be so terrifying to the English