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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
so exhausted that assistance will be necessary to almost the entire population. To meet the large expenditure which will then be required, we ought now to lay aside half a million of dollars. Whatever may be thought as to the ultimate redemption of the Confederate currency, it can hardly be doubted that our Government will make good every dollar which may be consecrated to this noble work. It will never repudiate a bond which has been donated to a service so sacred. I leave this appeal with you — confidently expecting that you will render us every assistance in your power, and that by means of your co-operation scores of these dear little ones will be rescued from ignorance and vice, and be rendered worthy of the noble men whose names they bear — men who have lost limb or life that freedom might be saved. If you can in any way aid us, please let us hear from you by mail. Address Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Corresponding Secretary Orphan Committee, Richmond, Virginia
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
vited to make their wants known to us. In order the better to cultivate this great field, sub-committees have been appointed at prominent points to look out and place in schools those whom we propose to benefit, and to aid in disbursing the funds entrusted to the committee. Thus we hope to extend our operations to every county and every neighborhood in the Commonwealth. It is stated, on what seems to be good authority, that there are from five to ten thousand children in the State of Virginia whose fathers have been killed, have died or been disabled in the service. Every day that the struggle is protracted, the number, already so startling, will be increased. A large proportion of these little ones are in indigent circumstances. The means that had been accumulated by the toil and economy of their parents have been consumed during these long, sad years of war. While their property has been wasting away, the cost of education, like everything else, has been augmenting, u
J. L. Burrows (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confede
W. F. Broaddus (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confed
A. E. Dickinson (search for this): article 2
the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, butal with you — confidently expecting that you will render us every assistance in your power, and that by means of your co-operation scores of these dear little ones will be rescued from ignorance and vice, and be rendered worthy of the noble men whose names they bear — men who have lost limb or life that freedom might be saved. If you can in any way aid us, please let us hear from you by mail. Address Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Corresponding Secretary Orphan Committee, Richmond, Virgini
Colin Bass (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confede
so exhausted that assistance will be necessary to almost the entire population. To meet the large expenditure which will then be required, we ought now to lay aside half a million of dollars. Whatever may be thought as to the ultimate redemption of the Confederate currency, it can hardly be doubted that our Government will make good every dollar which may be consecrated to this noble work. It will never repudiate a bond which has been donated to a service so sacred. I leave this appeal with you — confidently expecting that you will render us every assistance in your power, and that by means of your co-operation scores of these dear little ones will be rescued from ignorance and vice, and be rendered worthy of the noble men whose names they bear — men who have lost limb or life that freedom might be saved. If you can in any way aid us, please let us hear from you by mail. Address Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Corresponding Secretary Orphan Committee, Richmond, Virgini
Wellington Goddin (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confed
J. B. Jeter (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confede
R. L. Montague (search for this): article 2
The education of disabled soldiers and soldiers children — an important question. Richmond, Va., January 1, 1865. At the annual meeting of the Baptist General Association of Virginia, in June, 1864, the following persons were appointed a committee to provide for the education of the children of deceased and disabled soldiers, namely: Colin Bass, Esq.; Wellington Goddin, Esq.; Rev. A. E. Dickinson, Hon. R. L. Montague, J. B. Jeter, D. D.; J. L. Burrows, D. D.; and W. F. Broaddus, D. D. The committee have matured a plan of operations which, it is hoped, will greatly further the object. They propose, not to originate schools, but to patronize such as now exist, or may hereafter be brought into existence; to limit their efforts, except in special cases, to aid in giving a good English education; and, in making their appropriations, to be controlled by neither sectarian, sectional nor social distinctions. It has been determined also to assist soldiers, disabled in the Confed
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