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at last, God having tried their faith and manhood in the fiery furnace seven times heated, rewarded them finally with liberty and independence! Nor are these the only examples which the same race have afforded of achievements that we would do well to equal before we settle down in the pleasing conviction that Americans are the greatest of mankind. Do we not remember how Frederick of Prussia, with a population of scarcely five millions of inhabitants, carried on a seven year's war, from 1756 to 1763, against the combined forces of Austria, Russia, France, Sweden and Saxony? In the course of this war, with far inferior forces, he was under the necessity of meeting superior forces, as sailing him at all points. In the battle of Rossbach, Frederick had only twenty-two thousand opposed to an army of fifty thousand. In the battle near Leu then, he had only thirty thousand to oppose eighty thousand; and in both these instances, he gained most signal victories. But he had many sad r
n; the retreat of the French from Moscow, the crossing of the Berezine, the rear guard under Ney, whose heroic endurance yet stands unrivalled! " The invasion of Hannibal reduced Rome to straits similar to those which form our present crisis. The campaigns of 218, 217, and 216, with the defeats on the Trebia, the Lake Trasimene, and the crushing blow at Cannæ, where her legions were all but annihilated, the defection of all Southern Italy, and the dread of " Hannibal ante portas" had reduced her to the last extremities. In that terrible battle forty thousand Romans (at the lowest calculation) had fallen, and three thousand horse, involving the death of sand not less than eighty senators, among the slain. History does not record any defeat more complete, and very few more murderous. It was at such a moment that Hannibal sought to open negotiations, and Rome refused to entertain them; sent Marcellus to command the fugitives and stragglers whom Varro was trying to rally; ordered n
January 1st (search for this): article 1
"No nation ever gained its freedom without suffering; and had we time to refer to the facts of history, we could easily show how true it is that others have suffered more and struggled longer." "Let us confess it, there has been no nation which has started upon her career of freedom with such boastfulness, and looked upon her struggles as so transient, her victory as so easily achieved, as ours. Shall we be found boasters; indeed, vain boasters?" --Dr. Minnegerode's New Year's Sermon. Something more is involved in the issue of this conflict than the question of independence. It is to settle our rank in the human race; to show whether it be really true, as asserted by some philosophers, that the European stamina degenerates in America, and that Americans are inferior in profoundness of passion, tenacity of purpose, and strength of endurance, to the people of the Old World. It is common, in some parts of this continent, to look down upon the inhabitants of Europe
Americans (search for this): article 1
volved in the issue of this conflict than the question of independence. It is to settle our rank in the human race; to show whether it be really true, as asserted by some philosophers, that the European stamina degenerates in America, and that Americans are inferior in profoundness of passion, tenacity of purpose, and strength of endurance, to the people of the Old World. It is common, in some parts of this continent, to look down upon the inhabitants of Europe as inferior to this free, iseven times heated, rewarded them finally with liberty and independence! Nor are these the only examples which the same race have afforded of achievements that we would do well to equal before we settle down in the pleasing conviction that Americans are the greatest of mankind. Do we not remember how Frederick of Prussia, with a population of scarcely five millions of inhabitants, carried on a seven year's war, from 1756 to 1763, against the combined forces of Austria, Russia, France, Swe
to his admirable sermon, "how Athens gave up her city for the salvation of Greece; transported her women and children to Aegina and Troezene, and sent her men to man 'the wooden walls" which the Oracle had pronounced their safety, and in which they gained the battle of Salamis. Remember the siege of Tyre and Sidon and other cities, and their heroic defence — the like of which this war has not yet seen; the retreat of the French from Moscow, the crossing of the Berezine, the rear guard under Ney, whose heroic endurance yet stands unrivalled! " The invasion of Hannibal reduced Rome to straits similar to those which form our present crisis. The campaigns of 218, 217, and 216, with the defeats on the Trebia, the Lake Trasimene, and the crushing blow at Cannæ, where her legions were all but annihilated, the defection of all Southern Italy, and the dread of " Hannibal ante portas" had reduced her to the last extremities. In that terrible battle forty thousand Romans (at the lowest calcu
, the rear guard under Ney, whose heroic endurance yet stands unrivalled! " The invasion of Hannibal reduced Rome to straits similar to those which form our present crisis. The campaigns of 218, 217, and 216, with the defeats on the Trebia, the Lake Trasimene, and the crushing blow at Cannæ, where her legions were all but annihilated, the defection of all Southern Italy, and the dread of " Hannibal ante portas" had reduced her to the last extremities. In that terrible battle forty thousand Romans (at the lowest calculation) had fallen, and three thousand horse, involving the death of some of the wealthiest and most distinguished citizens, with one consul, both the pro-consuls, both the quaestors, twenty-one out of forty-eight tribunes, and not less than eighty senators, among the slain. History does not record any defeat more complete, and very few more murderous. It was at such a moment that Hannibal sought to open negotiations, and Rome refused to entertain them; sent Marcellus t
Marcellus (search for this): article 1
nd Romans (at the lowest calculation) had fallen, and three thousand horse, involving the death of some of the wealthiest and most distinguished citizens, with one consul, both the pro-consuls, both the quaestors, twenty-one out of forty-eight tribunes, and not less than eighty senators, among the slain. History does not record any defeat more complete, and very few more murderous. It was at such a moment that Hannibal sought to open negotiations, and Rome refused to entertain them; sent Marcellus to command the fugitives and stragglers whom Varro was trying to rally; ordered new levies, bought up slaves from their masters (who waited for payment till the treasury was replenished) to serve as light troops; enrolled even debtors and prisoners in the Roman legions.-- Contractors supplied stores, agreeing to wait for payment till the end of the war; the fortunes of minors and widows, which were in the hands of guardians and trustees, were advanced to the State, to be repaid at a future
Minnegerode (search for this): article 1
, there has been no nation which has started upon her career of freedom with such boastfulness, and looked upon her struggles as so transient, her victory as so easily achieved, as ours. Shall we be found boasters; indeed, vain boasters?" --Dr. Minnegerode's New Year's Sermon. Something more is involved in the issue of this conflict than the question of independence. It is to settle our rank in the human race; to show whether it be really true, as asserted by some philosophers, that the are fighting under no such disadvantages, who have been subjected to no such disasters and trials, need not fail unless we are inferior in spirits, patriotism and endurance to those benighted and outlandish Germans! "Remember," exclaims Dr. Minnegerode, in a note to his admirable sermon, "how Athens gave up her city for the salvation of Greece; transported her women and children to Aegina and Troezene, and sent her men to man 'the wooden walls" which the Oracle had pronounced their safety,
three thousand horse, involving the death of some of the wealthiest and most distinguished citizens, with one consul, both the pro-consuls, both the quaestors, twenty-one out of forty-eight tribunes, and not less than eighty senators, among the slain. History does not record any defeat more complete, and very few more murderous. It was at such a moment that Hannibal sought to open negotiations, and Rome refused to entertain them; sent Marcellus to command the fugitives and stragglers whom Varro was trying to rally; ordered new levies, bought up slaves from their masters (who waited for payment till the treasury was replenished) to serve as light troops; enrolled even debtors and prisoners in the Roman legions.-- Contractors supplied stores, agreeing to wait for payment till the end of the war; the fortunes of minors and widows, which were in the hands of guardians and trustees, were advanced to the State, to be repaid at a future time; the Senate met to deliberate, and the Consul,
, God having tried their faith and manhood in the fiery furnace seven times heated, rewarded them finally with liberty and independence! Nor are these the only examples which the same race have afforded of achievements that we would do well to equal before we settle down in the pleasing conviction that Americans are the greatest of mankind. Do we not remember how Frederick of Prussia, with a population of scarcely five millions of inhabitants, carried on a seven year's war, from 1756 to 1763, against the combined forces of Austria, Russia, France, Sweden and Saxony? In the course of this war, with far inferior forces, he was under the necessity of meeting superior forces, as sailing him at all points. In the battle of Rossbach, Frederick had only twenty-two thousand opposed to an army of fifty thousand. In the battle near Leu then, he had only thirty thousand to oppose eighty thousand; and in both these instances, he gained most signal victories. But he had many sad reverses,
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