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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 1, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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How quotas are filled in Yankeedom. Brigadier-General G. W. Hinks, of the United States army, in command of recruiting rendezvous, Hart's island, near New York, has recently addressed an interesting letter to the Adjutant-General respecting the recruiting and bounty system. His statements will seem incredible only to those who have not had opportunities of knowing how the Yankee recruiting business has been carried on. The swindle on the Government and people have been unprecedented. General Hinks says: "Felony is compounded and crime condemned by magistrates, that criminals may be sent into the army to stain its fair fame, imperil its success and dishonor its faithful soldiers, or desert its banners to join the enemy, enlist again in some other locality, consummating a double fraud — all to fill the quotas. "Drunkards, useless for any purposes of life, are suborned to defraud the Government and country by enlisting as soldiers — to fill the quotas. "Imbeciles a
G. W. Hinks (search for this): article 4
How quotas are filled in Yankeedom. Brigadier-General G. W. Hinks, of the United States army, in command of recruiting rendezvous, Hart's island, near New York, has recently addressed an interesting letter to the Adjutant-General respecting the recruiting and bounty system. His statements will seem incredible only to those who have not had opportunities of knowing how the Yankee recruiting business has been carried on. The swindle on the Government and people have been unprecedented. GeGeneral Hinks says: "Felony is compounded and crime condemned by magistrates, that criminals may be sent into the army to stain its fair fame, imperil its success and dishonor its faithful soldiers, or desert its banners to join the enemy, enlist again in some other locality, consummating a double fraud — all to fill the quotas. "Drunkards, useless for any purposes of life, are suborned to defraud the Government and country by enlisting as soldiers — to fill the quotas. "Imbeciles
December 31st, 1864 AD (search for this): article 4
jected when they arrive at the general rendezvous; and in many cases the town or county agent, broker, runner, and recruit, combine in the employment of every artifice to conceal the defects and incapacity of the recruit before enlistment; and after the credit has been obtained and the bounty divided, assist him to magnify his disabilities and wrongs, that he may be discharged, and they permitted to use him again — to fill the quotas. "At this post alone, during the quarter ending December 31, 1864, forty-five recruits were discharged upon examination by a "board of inspectors" for utter worthlessness, to wit: seventeen for immaturity, three for old age, seven for chronic diseases, two for deformities, three for hernia, eight for epilepsy, three for asthma, and two for insanity. A large number of others were, for similar causes, evidently unfit for the duties of a soldier in active service, but were retained and sent to their regiments, because it was probable they might be of so